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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 August 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but In the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Blk. Telephone Main 24. THAT SILENT PROTEST PARADE A movement is on foot to put on a silent protest parade in Seattle September 22nd —Lincoln's emancipation day—and we truly hope it will be perfected. May, perhaps, it will not improve existing conditions, so far as the Negro is concerned, one single iota, but there is one thing certain, it will...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 August 1917

HERE AND THERE The Knights of Pythia has been in ses sion in St. Louis for the past week and it is reported the largest delegation of mem bers of the order that have ever before as sembled were on hand. The Twenty-fourth Infantry is now at Camp Logan near Houston, Texas, and the company is reported to be in the pink of condition. It recently had a row with the whites of Texas and as a result some un pleasantness was created. Many attempts have bee nmade to burn I lie homes of colored folks in East St. Louis, who left them at the time of the riots and as yet have not returned. This is evidently being done with the view of intimidating them into not returning 1. Political jealousy of the spirit of, "If I can't, you shant," is responsible for the retirement of the Ohio Colored Company, at which Col. Young was as the head. The row raged so raw and strong that the governor tired of it all and ordered the company disbanded, which means the per manent retirement of Col. Young. This is the ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 August 1917

TAKE YOUR CHOICE Faith is not feeling. "Faith is the substance of things hoped for;" feeling is often but the empty bub ble blown by perserve human nature. Faith rests upon the unchangeable foun dations of God's word; feeling floats upon the fickle currents of physical or mental conditions. Faith is always upright and trust worthy; feeling is often despicably mean and low, and therefore unreliable. Faith constantly brings victory; feeling largely produces failure. Faith sees clearly in the time of great est darkness; feeling is befogged and con fused in time of greates light. Faith speaks to fre cone from the power of physical ills; feeling vents itself to en tangle one in the meshes of his own fallen nature. Faith creates its own atmosphere; feeling sucumbs to the miasma of the hour. Faith triumphantly presses forward in th efaee of bitter opposition; feeling gives up as soon as a bar is thrown across its path. Faith asks not for demonstration of the truth before accepting it; feel...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 18 August 1917

IN THE PUBLIC EYE Dr. Felix B. Cooper has returned from a week's vacation and outing. Henry Jones of Kennydale, is in bad health just now and is compelled to hire others to do most of the work about his ranch. Rev. W. D. Carter was out fishing last Thursday and the only reason there is not a long fish story in these columns from him is that the reporter outran him. Mm. Jennie Vrooman has moved into her new hotel and it is simply a thing of beauty. When it comes to fixing things up in apple pie order she can not be dis counted. Louis Toomer is suffering from high blood pressure, which was superinduced by too high priced pork chops and sirloin steaks. This high cost of living will get the best of u> if we follow it up. Andrew R. Black and I. F. Norrii will speak at Bremerton today (Saturday) to a picnic and barbecue given under the aus pices of the A. M. E. church of that city with Rev. Knight, the pastor, the moving spirit. Nelson P. Fisher, who some time ago be gan the gathering ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 September 1917

m^___^^^^^^^^ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Faoiflo Bile. Telephone Main 24. NEGRO SOLDIERS RETALIATE Negro soldiers always run amuck in the South, but are always ideal soldiers in the North. Just how such bad men in the South can suddenly become such good men in the North and vice versa is the perplex ing question to thoughtful minds. No one has ever heard of colored soldiers shooting up Northern...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 September 1917

IN THE PUBLIC EYE The public schools of Seattle will open next Tuesday, Monday being labor day, and again young America will take up arms and continue to learn to shoot, at least edu cationally. Rev. W. I). Carter and Mrs. Carter left for Oklahoma yesterday, where the annual Baptist Convention will be held, and they will be away for three weeks or more. They have had a successful year in their work in the Northwest and can but carry good news to their brethren living in other sections of the country. Rev. D. A. Graham and Mrs. Graham will leave next Sunday evening for Great Falls, Montana, where the Puget Sound A. M. E. Conference will assemble for its annual session. Rev. Graham has had a very suc cessful year in Seattle and the most, if not all, of the members of his congregation hope that he will be returned for another year. The local branch of the National Asso ciation for the Advancement of Colored People has called a mass meeting to be held in the First A. M. E. church Septem...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 September 1917

contract was let to The Seattle Daily Re publican as the second daily paper to pub lish the proposed new city charter before 10 o'clock, and thus did those fellows get beat at their own game, and though they took the matter into court, -it but added more expense to their grab game as the court ruled against them. So in spite of your general cussedness you have done the community a little bit of good," came from Col. Byron Phelps one day this week, who was twice elected treasurer of King county, once mayor of Seattle and twice auditor of King county. In times of trouble and disappointment, one thinks of mother first of all and it is her comfort that gives courage to the faint ing heart. Many wayward young men have been known to march cooly to their death on being encouraged by their mothers to meet their fates with braveness. No won der Sam Owens, who is a prisoner in the King county jail, charged with burglary, mourned without comfort one day this week, when he learned from an elder...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 1 September 1917

THE APPEAL OF THE PRIMITIVE JAZZ (Literary Digest) A strange word has gained wide-spread use in the ranks of our producers of pop ular music. It is "jazz," used mainly as an adjective descriptive of a band. The group that play for dancing, when colored, seem infected with the virus that they try to instil as a stimulus in others. They shake and jump and writhe in ways to suggest a return of the medieval jumping mania. The word, according to Walter Kingsley, famous in the ranks of vaude ville, is variously spelled jas, jass,, jasz, and jascz; and is African in origin. Laf eadio Hearn, we are told, found the word in the Creole patois and idiom of New Orleans and reported that it meant "speed ing up things." The Creoles had taken it from the blacks, and "applied it to music of a rudimentary syncopated type." In the New York Sun, Mr. Kingsley rehearses many of the curious facts and customs as sociated with the word: "In the old plantation days, when the slaves were having one of their r...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 September 1917

_____^*^________ m^m^M mmmW __^____T __^________**^^____T *^M\ __T ______T^ ___________^*^^_^J____^^^ _____P^ _______T -____0-H ______________ ______^^_____T _____T ______■ ____a**"_____r __i_____r PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Blfc. Telephone Main 24. PACIFICIST BARRED And now its the Pacificists that have oc curred the displeasure of President Wilson and, like other elements of our cosmopoli tan ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 September 1917

THE PASSING THRONG A DIFFERENT STORY TOLD. The Associate Press sent out a different story when the Kentucky white soldiers ran amuck and beat up a lot of colored people than it did when the black soldiers ran a muck and avenged the dastardly outrages that had been perpetrated upon them from time to time by the white citizens of Texas. It had no censure for the white soldiers, but it pronounced the colored soldiers sav ages for their retaliatory acts. In other words, the same acts committed by a white soldier and commended by the general pub lic (white) is pronounced the most heinous of crimes, when committed by black sold iers. There has never been a disturbance of a riotous nature between whites and blacks in the United States, in which the blacks were the aggressors. Two centuries of subjection to the whites of this country has made of the blacks a quiet and submis sive people and they have to be imposed upon almost beyond human endurance be fore they are provoked to defend themse...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 September 1917

the South live in rural communities. Of this number 3,000,000 are engaged in ag ricultural pursuits, cultivating 100,000,000 acres. As owners and renters of land, we are cultivating 41,500,000 acres. This acreage is twice that under cultivation either in Virginia or New England. Nev ertheless, the South does not produce enough food to feed itself, drawing on the rest of the country annually for farm products recently estimated as worth $75, --000,000. The reason for this is found in the fact that cotton and sugar cane held sway. Di versified farming is only now coming into vogue. The Colored people simply imi tated the whites, with the result that all suffered. Northern enterprise had to be injected to make them see the advantage of planting other farm products save the two mentioned. Latin and Greek may not be needed to run a farm, but the success ful farmer is the one with a good educa tion. He directs and works in a scientific manner. Success is bound to follow. Preparation for r...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 8 September 1917

HERE IT IS "Pal," yon will be interested to know, is the (Jipsy word for "brother." The name of the flower "Petunia" is from "petnm" or "petnn," an old name for tobacco. It is, therefore, a species of tobacco. Marabou feathers of which women's boas, muffs and hat trimmings are made, are taken from beneath the wings of the Mara bou stork, a native bird of West Africa. "Perfume" is derived from the Latin per, meaning "from," and "fnmns," meaning smoke. The first perfumes were wood or aromatic gums which gave off pleasing odors in burning. '"Picnic" is a corruption of the French "pique-nique." In its native country it means an entertainment in which each per son contributes to the general supply of the table. In France it does not apply, as it does here, to an outdoor entertainment. The raven is the first bird named in the Bible (Gen. 8:7). Although it feeds upon fruits and seeds, it also eats the flesh of dead animals, and so was considered un clean. The reference to the raven in Isai...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 September 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLEY PRICE FIVE CENTS OAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Blk. Telephone Main 34. LET'S ALL BE AMERICANS A story is told of a millionaire woman, who was out driving- on a very cold day and perchanced to see a poor woman out picking up wood, with which to build a fire to keep herself and her children warm. Her heart filled with sympathy as she rode past the aged woman gathering- the scat tering fagots...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 September 1917

THE PASSING THRONG Seattle may he the cleanest town in the West as declares Mayor Gill and Chief Beck ingham, but we would hate to live in the dirtiest town in the West, if Seattle is the cleanest. James S. Murray, who has been o n his back for many weeks suffering from a form of rheumatism, is about town again and is the same congenial Jim Murray that he has ever been. He admits now that he is more than fifty, but is silent as to how much more. The Vrooman Hotel held its grand open ing last Friday and many atended its dedi cation by Sergant and Mrs. Vrooman. The Vrooman has thirty-four rooms and all ele gantly furnished and its spacious lobby and pool room to the rear add tone and quality to the place. Mrs. — - - Miller has recently opened a delicatessen and woman's exchange next door to Hie Woodson on Twenty-fourth ave nue, which is very artistically arranged. There has been an opening for such a place in thai locality for a number of years and it is strange it has not been done p...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 September 1917

RENEWS OLD ACQUAINTANCE 19r.2 11th St. N. W., Washintgton, D. C, Sept. 6, 1917. My Dear Mr. Cayton: Once again I am your debtor. From the western border of the continent where our far flung civilization halts, comes Cayton's Weekly, "a thing of beauty," to cause the burial places of memory to give up their dead, and me to renew a friendship born in "the land of cotton" over three decades ago. The Weekly in looks, in "pep," is greatly in advance of the usual publications put forth by the race. "North West Prosper ity Number" is a veritable "live wire." Things are pointedly and trenchantly said, and all must "sit up and take notice" that there is "something doing" in Seattle and Tacoma. Eden must be seated there or the New Jerusalem seen in apocalyptic vision by John on Patmos. Were I a young man, nothing would pre vent a visit to this Promised Land. I have children who, peradventure, may consider the golden opportunities so eloquently pre sented in your paper. The prosperity of you a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 15 September 1917

EXPERIENCES AND OBSERVATIONS Coffee Stains —Coffee stains may be re moved from fabrics of heavy weave by ap plying glycerine, slightly diluted. It may be scrubbed in vigorously and sponged af terward with clear ether. A. T. For Plaited Skirts —In pressing the plaits in children's dresses, instead of basting them down, I find that pinning them in place, top and bottom, to the ironing-board cover and stretching them slightly is much easier. J- S. Ironing Shirt Cuffs —Immediately after ironing stiff shirt cuffs, bring them together exactly as they will be when the links are in, and fasten with a spring clothespin. They will harden in just the right curves without wrinkles. E. W. Easy Aprons —l use the ruffles of worn summer dresses in making tea aprons. Do not rip, but cut the ruffle close to material and sew on apron. Several aprons can be made in a short time in this way. Some times part of the old dress skirt can be used with the ruffle still on, .just hemming the sides and putting ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 September 1917

v ' ' ■■—* W g J@aifZch&4zeeA^( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Blk. Telephone Main 24. EMANCIPATION Fifty-five years ago the colored folk of the United States distinctly heard the blow that broke the shackels of slavery from them and three months thereafter they stepped forth from their prison cells free men and women. For two hundred years the ancestry of the four million freedmen had ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 September 1917

IN THE PUBLIC EYE Abe Lincoln. Rev. 11. M. Collins spent last Wednesday ih Seattle bidding farefell to friends wlioui he has met during the five years he has pas ticc 1 the A. M. E, church in Tacoma. Few ministers have succeeded so admirably in the Northwest as did Rev. Collins and all who know him regret to have him transfer to another conference. The Northwest is sadly in need of able men of the type of Mr. Collins and more should come instead of those it already has being transferred. Joseph Moss, one of the heavy property holders of the city, and who has for a num ber of years been in the junk collecting business, has joined the Rotary Club, he having recently purchased a splendid tour in jr car. In enumerating those who own machines, some time ago, the name of F. A. Reid was overlooked. lie, like Mr. Moss, lias an up-to-date touring car and he and his wife and occasionally a friend make many pleasant trips through the country. Mr. and Mrs. John B. Scott are the latest acquisiti...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 September 1917

a great balance wheel to the whole. The Pacific Coast Steel Company is an institu tion that not only Seattle can feel proud of, it being in existence within her con fines, but the state of Washington should feel equally proud. You, who have never seen it in operation, have not the slightest idea of how extensive this great industry is and you will not believe it even when you read this and you can not believe it until you have actually seen it. United States Senate, Sept. 12, 1917. My dear Mr. Cayton: I want to con gratulate you most heartily upon your Northwest Prosperity number of Cayton's Weekly. It is splendidly gotten up and presents in a very fine way the activities of typical representatives of your people. I feel sure they appreciate the splendid pro duction you have gotten out. I shall keep it as a reference. With heartiest good wishes. Richard Paul is attending the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, which has been sitting in Seattle for the past week. Mr. Paul has bee...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 22 September 1917

THERE IS ALWAYS A FIELD By 11. P. Lawhorn The question has often been asked me, "Is There R Field for Colored Heal Sstate Agents in the Northwest," to which I have always answered Yes. Being the pioneer Colored Real Estate Agent in the Northwest, I have had the opportunity of studying the question and the requirements of the agent at close range. I am one who believes that there is a "Field" for colored men, in all lines of business, if he will properly prepare and fit himself for the business, whether it be selling real estate, banking, merchandiz ing, commercial, editing a newspaper, doc toring the sick or in any other Held of en deavor where the human family is engaged. They make a serious mistake, who assume and proclaim, that the bnsines and profes sional work of the world can only be done by the dominant race, and that the Neg roes place in the world is a menial one, "the drawing of water and the hewing 1 of wood." During the 50 years' of freedom, the Negro has proven his abil...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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