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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

COUNTY ROAD REPAIRS. Editor The Ranch: Your article upon the above subject in your issue of August 14 contained much truth, and the concluding recom mendation was excellent. I sincerely wish the latter part would be careful ly considered by our county people and acted upon at the next road dis trict meeting in each precinct in the state, especially in this (my) district. As an exhibition of what can be done in the "way" of expending the county funds, and how it is done, I believe this district is unequalled, and if there are any students in the "road construction department" at Pullman who possibly can see this district, the time would not be wasted, and the experience gained would be valuable. The road material is "dumped" out of the wagon bed, it is then carefully ' piled up to a ridge in the center, the width of the dump is about four feet, and about two feet high. The wheel track is just on the edge of the dump and a single horse walks on the pile, when he cannot dodge it, it be...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

6 WHAT ADVANTAGES HAVE WE GAINED FROM OUR PURE FOOD LAW. B. A. McDonald. Stato Dairy and Food Commissioner. My subject is one with which I can not claim to be unfamiliar for two reasons: Ist. I have had Pure Food for my meals three times a day for the last three years to satisfy my physical wants. 2nd. I have been digesting Pure Food literature from 8 to 12 hours ev ery day for the same length of time. So if you think I am not acquanted with my subject you are mistaken. I cannot believe that the anxiety to enforce the Pure Food Law dur ing the last three years has been the cause of a few silver threads appear ing in the covering on the top of my head, but such may be the case. The subject which has been given me might with more propriety been given to some disinterested person who would have no reason to paint the pic ture more beautiful than the reality. It is only natural for me to believe that more has been accomplished than really has. I will endeavor to treat the subject in as ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

they could, closing out all suspicious goods, and buying no more goods with out receiving a guarantee of their pu rity. Immediately after the passage of the law the average stock of groceries was not worth more than 50 cents on the dollar, for the reason that there was an accumulation of worthless and unsaleable brands of goods. The aver age stock to-day in Washington is worth 90 cents on the dollar. The grocery stores are filled with foods which find a ready sale. There is very little unsaleable foods. When the law was passed the grocer's lace would as sume an air of distress, when the com missioner announced who he was. Now he will complain, if the commissioner should fail to visit his store on his in specting tour. Formally he was ashamed of his stock, now he is proud of it. This statement may seem exag gerated by the ignorant but every deal er knows that the above statements are true. Almost all foods are marked in Eng lish and are true to the label. The label giving the charact...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

8 THE PACIFIC COAST CONDEN- SARY AT KENT, KING CO. Editor The Ranch: It is now about three years ago since this enterprise established and commenced operations in a small way at Kent. It attracted little attention at the time amongst the dairymen of the White River valley. To obtain a supply of milk the coun ty sent out a representative amongst the njilk shippers of the district and at once offered a better price for the fluid. The business men of Kent looked with favor upon the establishment of the new industry, for it at once put a new business into life, made a month ly pay roll, added to the taxable valua tion of the town and might cause oth er manufacturers to do likewise. The company at once made it known that first-class quality was important and agreed to pay, did pay, and ever since has continued to pay an extra price for extra quality of butter fat, and in an equitable ratio. This condensary was an experiment, a costly one at that, for it had to com pete with several old a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

! r; E. J. BOWEM ! § vT#*e only Exclusive Seed Merchant on the Coast x if* *r 4* A full and Complete Stock of X I ALFALFA, TIMOTHY, CLOVER, GRASS, | I GARDEN AND FIELD SEEDS, f :..■:::.■.:.-, . . . ..-,.....■■.... „j, X : : ■ . Constantly on hand at Lowest Prices. <f t Pacific Coast Agent for Cyphers Incubators, Humphrey's { I Bone Cutters, Harding's Meat Meal, i $ Wilbur's Stock and Poultry Food, Rumsey's Spray Pumps, Etc. | >n' ~■■•.■•-■.■-.;■■.'■-■ ■ ■ ■ • • r«^ I; Carry a full line of Poultry Suppies and Spraying Materials. Write for catalog. % 1 319 FIRST Aye. ::::::: SEATTLE. t ± that has ever been made for feeding Calves. MORAL: Thousands many benefit by the Perseverance of One. N. B. —It is made by the O. H. Mfg. Co., Lyndon, Vt. Lilly-Bogardus, Se attle, are Coast agents. The above is the story of the found ing of a business by Mr. I. H. Hall, jr. Starting in this small way, Mr. Hall, who is a young man of ideas and resources, has succeeded in establish ing a trade ex...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

10 ALL ABOUT CEMENT WORK. The Portland cement is put up in barrels containing 380 pounds net, while the cheap grades are usually put up 275 pounds to the barrel. A barrel of cement will make the con crete and give the finishing coat to 100 square feet for the floor in the cow stable, hog house or outbuildings. This calls for three inches of concrete and a half-inch of topping. In the horse stable, where heavy, sharp-shod horses stamp flies, we think it safer to use double that amount to a hundred square feet, -using five inches of con crete and one of topping. My stable noors have been in use now over ten years and there is not a flaw or break in them anywhere; they show so little sign of wearing I believe they will last a hundred years op more. . A subscriber in Indiana asks for a plan for making cement walls for barns, and the cost compared with stone; the stone must be brought fif teen miles. He wishes to know what lue cost of a hundred feet of wall would be. A perfect wall found...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

need not be more than 15 or 18 inches square under each post. For the rest of the floor, simply excavate until you come to solid earth or hardpan and level it up to within 6 inches of where you wish the floor to be finished in the horse stable part, and 3M; or 4 inches in the feed rooms and cow stables. I built a hog house 32 feet long two years ago, and the man who put in the foundation (which is a ce ment floor built as I recommended) by mistake made one end of it two inches short, and the man who framed it taking my statement of the figures, 32 feet long, framed the building so the posts only caught on the edge of the floor two inches. I was so well satisfied, however, of the strength of the cement that we put up the house in this way, and we put 15,000 pounds of weight on the floor the first season md the same the past season and it has stood all right. As you will notice, I say in answer ing one of the questions above, I pre fer not to make a wall either of brick, stone or ceme...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

12 FRAKES' HOLSTEINS. Among the breeder! of Holstein- Priesian cattle in Oregon, Mr. P. A. Frakes, of Scappoose, is particularly prominent, owning more than one-half Of all the pure-bred animals of this breed in tho state. For a number of years he has been gradually building up his herd of blaek-and-whites, exer cising the most scrupulous care in the selection and development of the dif ferent animals, and sparing no paint; to bring them all to the highest point of excellence. To head the herd, Mr. Frakes secured, some years ago, an exceptionally well-bred bull from the well-known New York breeders, Henry Stevens & Sons, Brookside herd, La cona, N. V., and later, when in need of another, he again placed his order with the same firm. Both animals were carried across the continent by express, each reaching his destination safely and in good condition. Last year Mr. Frakes bought two heifrr calves from Brookside, which, like the two animals purchased before, were not seen by him un...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

THE OREGON STATE FAIR. Has come to be acknowledged the greatest livestock show center on the Pacific Coast. "The exhibit this year will eclipse all former years," says M. 1, Wisdom, secretary. ■The stallroom for livestock of a kinds and space in the pavilion where the country exhibits will be displayed are being taken up rapidly. John Sparks, of Reno, Nev., will be on hand with one of the finest herds of Here ford cattle in the west. He has en gaged 20 stalls,, and will show his en tire herd. He writes that the visitors to the fair can expect to see as fine cattle in his herd as were ever seen in the world. He has a competitor in 0. B. Wade, the Pendleton banker, who has been in the eastern market md purchased some of the best Here ords to be had. Mr. Wade had a very competent herdsman with his ,attle, and the competition between these herds will be very keen. C. E. Ladd, of the Oak Hill stock farm, and W. O. Minor, of the Mountain Valley stock farm, will be competitors again this y...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

14 SOME OF OUR FOOL LAND LAWS. By Elwood Mead. The homestead law may have serv ed a useful, even a beneficent, purpose throughout large sections of the re public, but it is not adapted to the set tlement of a region where practically nothing can be grown except by arti ficial application of water. This fact has been learned at last through many years of hardship and disappointment at the cost of many million dollars. One of the most pitiful pages in the history of the west is that which re cords the story of the settlement of the semi-arid belt lying between the ninety-seventh meridian and the foot hills of the Rocky mountains. This is a territory 500 miles wide, extending from Canada to Mexico, including eastern Colorado, the western por tions of the two Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas and Texas. In the absence of scientific demon stration to the contrary, tens of thou sands of people rushed into this terri tory under the delusion that it was a land of reliable rainfall or would soon bec...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

HOW TO BEGIN TILING. Judging from the number of letters which we receive making inquiries as to how to tile this or that particular piece of ground, sometimes enclosing plats of the same, we infer that there is an awakened interest in the subject of tiling. This is quite natural. Lands that have produced abundant crops for the last four or five years are this year total failures. The problem dur ing this season in a great part of the west has been not how to conserve moisture but how to get rid of it. The farmer must understand both, and thus be ready for any kind of a season that may be given him. Some of our readers seem to think that if they give us a written descrip tion of their land, or send us a plat, that we can tell them where to locate their drains, the cost of tile, the cost of construction, etc., etc. The cost of tiling varies with the distance from the nearest tile factory. The depth of drains must be determined by the charcter of the subsoil and of the soil itself and ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 September 1902

i 6 AS YE SOW, SO SHALL YE ALSO REAP! ,— __ , \ = I—.1 —. ■ ■ ; ; ; —. Are you going to cultivate the land and harvest a crop of .m.n potato.., cockerel, dodder, etc.? NEVER! The wWe-awake farmer, buys test ed, honest .. a a a A A A A d A <— ■■ J-. — '^ a .»Tm ' _.— I, i *is^^^^a-^w— .^^™ ** ' y "w^^. w V v v w w V v v 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 © 9 9 9 99 9 9 9 9 9 9 • ••••••••••••• "^^^^^^^^^^^^^"-^^^^^^^^^^ •••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••«••«• LOOK FOR THIS J^ $jmjlj&@. IT IS A SIGN TRADEMARK. » M2j}M Jm OF QUALITY JillifJ}itijardus*(a SEATTLE, - - U. S. A. THE RANCH.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

' — ' ' ■' — Ninataanth Year PROSPECTS. The Ranch has two or three times referred to a trip made by G. M. Taggart to the Orient, from where, after 8 months' touring among the principal ports of Japan, China and the Philippines, he returned some weeks ago. He went over there to in vestigate the outlook for future trade relations with those countries, and his optimistic opinions thereon we have already given our readers. * * * Mr. Taggart is a man of means, for years engaged in the banking business. He is a shrewd, calculating financier, who has always made a business of knowing values. Now he has gone over into the Palouse country and put a great deal of money into wheat lands. Why? Because he became so thoroughly convinced on his trip that the Orient will shortly be the consumer of all the wheat we can send her that the inevitable result will be a great advance in values of wheat lands of the Inland Empire. The Ranch has a good deal of confidence in the judgment of Mr. Taggart and b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

* M" fie/l HcnncyiJcc *-'ne WWSMtgUn The mBL Most THE KING PIN OF OUR LARGE LINE StrOl^St I^^WH^^^ DUrOble . OF IMPLEMENTS AND VEHICLES *. tf^iS^n^^fSfc^ *""'"'' GUARANTEED TO BE THE BEST WAGON POSSIBLE A^^^X/ \^X^\) " TO PRODUCE— COMBINING IN ITS MAKE UP ,^-T ><*- >cXv-C The Cream of Wagon Stock thoroughly Seasoned . i= = == ==^ Well Made by Skilled Mechanics . OUR AIM IS NOT TO EQUAL BUT SURPASS Well Ironed and Well Painted __=___ Wheels fnd^xleT'set right to insure Light Running Built especially for us for use on Oregon Roads. Made in There's Absolutely Nothing Better than a MITCHELL. Many Sizes and Styles to suit Varying Requirements. [vet) UHo°Dale M and Dairy flan Heeds a fare Spreader. THE KEMP IS THE *^Sfc§[l£ '^-^^ Ct>OFiil»Fb Also Examine Our best, we had an w£ \r^%W /nAfjiipfr OPKt^^> Hfl(lVfD nnTATA DlfifjfD OPEN FIELD AND SE- I V^^^^gX, l^*»Ullt' g) lIUUfIK KUIAIU UIIIULK EXAMINE THIS li\7/ and CASE PLOWS PIECE OF MA- WILL SPREAD ANY >liC I \ And Vario...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

m e ranch F With which la consolidated \Uf Washington Farmer, The ductile Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairymau, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Live Stock Breeders' Associa tion. MILLER FREEMAN, - Editor and M anager. Editorial OlUces: - - - Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1266—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - - Metropolitan Blag., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (In advance) f 1.00 per year. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. Uood commission and salaries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot H-ad It on our list from the name alone on the pa ner. We must have both name and address, and ell arrearages or dues must be paid a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

4 AN OBJECTION TO FOREST RE SERVES. 1-]. Q. llansen. The extreme drouth that has affect ed our state for several seasons past has awakened a desire in many people to discover some means by which to sik ci'stiily solve the question of a sufficient supply of water lor irriga tion and domestic purposes. Some have concluded that if all animals were excluded from grazing on the mountain ranges the water would be ample for all purposes. No one but those living adjacent to forest reserves knows what a calamity they are to the people. In order to procure a load of wood from a reserve where thousands of cords are rotting, one must first ob tain a permit from the supervisor de fining the locality where he wants to get the wood. If like the god of Baal the supervisors happen to be away on a visit or has gone on a journey, the applicant must await his return. Having the permit he is allowed to pile the wood and tops, and apply to the supervisor or some subordinate, who measures the wood. He may...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

RIGHT KIND OF NEIGHBORS. Homer Betty, of Toledo, is fortun ate in spite of his misfortune. On the night of September 9th his hop house was consumed by fire and six days later a new hop house was completed for him and was ready for business. Mr. Betty's misfortune consisted in having his hop house burn; he was for tunate in possessing neighbors who as sisted him so heartily in rebuilding. Charles Henriot, seconded by John Wallace, took charge of the matter and everything moved like clockwork. Mr. Veness turned his mills over to the task of getting out material for the building, and in spite of the scarcity of workmen at present, there was plenty of help to complete the work in the short time of six days. Mr. Betty says that his neighbors must think a whole lot of a hop man on general principles, or regard him as a pretty good fellow, or perhaps he has got darned good neighbors. In fact, he admits that he knows the last proposition to be true, thinks there are some grounds for believi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

6 THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE SILO. .1. A. Reagan. A silo is a room, pit or box holding forage crops packed away green. It should be strong enough to withstand the pressure of the settling contents, and as near air-tight as possible. It should be so placed as to be convenient to fill and feed from. I think it better generally to have it outside the barn rather than in it. If I were planning to build a barn with silos I would place them outside at one end of the barn convenient to the feed alley, and would build above ground. The size should be such as to give about 40 pounds en silage for each day's feeding for one cow, and 60 pounds for each 1,000 --pound steer. Ensilage in a 30-foot silo, refilled after settling, will weigh CO pounds per cubic foot toward the bot tom, and will average 50 pounds. The weight, of course, will be affected by the manner in which it is cut and packed, the finer it is cut the tighter it will pack. A common rule is to pro vide one cubic foot capacity for each...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

tongued and grooved pieces laid across. In silos with horizontal girts or with wooden hoops the door can be made as described as above for the wooden hooped silo. In a stave silo struts will have to be put in between the two staves that make the side of the door. These two staves should be extra strong. Eighteen inches is wide enough for a door. The natural clay makes a good floor. It is well to excavate this to basin shape, and if there is any danger of rats cutting through, cover it with concrete or tamp into it brok-en rock or gravel. The roof is necessary only to keep out the rain and snow. On a rect angular silo the roof can be put on the same as for any building of that shape. To roof a round silo is not so easy. I know from experience that it is very tedious to make a conical roof of shingles. When the circles get small almost every shingle has to be cut to make a neat job. For a small round silo probably the best way is to cover with planks cut wedge-shaped so as to fit toge...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

8 THE "SEATTLE SPIRIT" of the Firm of Z. C. MILES A PIPER CO. This Firm Takes in the North west Fixture Company. United Concern Is Now the Lar gest Jobbing House of Stoves and Electric Supplies on the Coast. In 1869 an ox train crossed the continent with a numerous com pany of young men for the grow ing West. At that time little was known of Puget Sound, so Mr. Z. C. Miles, who was one of the party, headed for San Francisco, thinking to make that his home. Arriving there in the fall, he soon learned of the set tlements of the North, which seemed to offer especial induce ments to young men of energy and grit. He seemed most favor ably impressed with the reports from Seattle, which was then a village of about 800 people. After purchasing a supply of goods he took a sailing vessel — then the only means of transpor tation —and arrived in Seattle early in 1870. Then a new firm was started, which was destined to become one of the largest and most respected houses in the Northwest. Waddell...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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