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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

March, 1988 Urbanites are targeted during Ag Week Virginia Agriculture Week kicks off March 15-21. The slogan, Virginia Agriculture: Providing the Basics, salutes the top 13 commodities in the state in terms of cash receipts. They are cattle and calves, milk, broilers, turkeys, tobacco, hogs, soybeans, peanuts, apples, eggs, corn for grain, wheat and sheep for lambs. National Agriculture Week, March 20-26, will be celebrated following the state's recognition. A television program called American Farmers will kick off the celebration. The program highlights changes in the nation's largest industry and employer. The program can be viewed on WVIR in Charlottesville and Richmond, WHSV in Harrisonburg, all at 12:30 p.m., and WJPR in Roanoke at 10 a.m. Visitors to Washington D.C. can see a special display at Capitol Hill. Designed to attract the attention of urban legislators, the display will feature a fine arts poster flanked by large panels with the names of organizations and individua...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

6 Tax reform still allows most taxpayers to take the full $2,000 IRA deduction ... same as before! IRA: Still The Tax Break To Take. ft Anyone not in a qualified retirement plan can still contribute up to $2,000 and take the full $2,000 deduction. ft Anyone who is in a qualified retirement plan can still contribute to an IRA. The deductible amount depends on your income level. When adjusted gross income is under $40,000 ($25,000 for singles), the full $2,000 deduction can be taken. Married couples can take up to $4,000 if both work and each earns at least $2,000. ft No deductible IRA contribution can be made by those with adjusted gross incomes of more than $50,000 ($35,000 for singles). &When adjusted gross income falls between $40,000 and $50,000 ($25,000 and $35,000 for singles) the $2,000 IRA deduction is reduced. These taxpayers can deduct $200 worth FARM BUREAU NEWS Southern Farm Bureau I LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY POST OFFICE BOX 78 / JACKSON. MISSISSIPPI 39205 / 601 ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

March, 1988 Immigration law requires extensive record keeping (Editor s note: Concern over the Immigration Reform and Control Act has prompted the Immigration and Naturalization Service to release information explaining its regulations. This article pertains to the responsibilities of Virginia farmers of keeping good records of their employees.) All employers—whether they have one employee or 100-must comply with new record keeping requirements under the Immigration Reform and Control Act. A new 1-9 form for each person hired after Nov. 6,1986, must be completed by the employer. This form is designed to verify that the newly hired is a U.S. citizen or a legally authorized alien worker. Within three business days after a new laborer begins work, the employer must inspect documents that verify the person's identity and eligibility to work. The employer must fill out a 1-9 form. There is one exception. Newly hireds have a 21-day grace period for producing the documents provided they su...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

8 Diversification a sticky business (Editor's note: This is the sixth article in a series on diversification, outlining methods farmers have developed to supplement their incomes.) By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor OAK GROVE —Developing new methods to sell the same product can turn into a sticky business. Just ask Chuck and Anne Geyer, managers of Westmoreland Berry Farm. Raising 50 acres of fruit, the couple wrestled with how to preserve what couldn't be sold fresh. Right, they preserved the fruit into jams. "We use all of our own fruit," Mrs. Geyer said. "We do seedless raspberry and seedless blackberry." In addition, apricot, red raspberry, blackberry, royalty raspberry, peach and HHni j fcwj I IH II yA, ****#»■ Anne Geyer stands in the skeleton of the new kitchen to be used for jam cooking. Spring savings Safemark!!! High productivity tillage tools Farm for Farm Bureau Members. Safemark has same fpH^E^ as original Automotive CHISEL SPIKE * F ° rd iP $35.00 m DISC BLADE Compare co...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

March, 1988 I I i W&KL* 19EWf' ma in i 7%,, X i ■ ?vmm± m t»» I V mtr I Jm V \ Harold Thomas Preserves venture doing 'berry' well Continued from page 8 Fredericksburg markets. Location has also given the Geyers access to farmers' markets. Westmoreland Berry Farm routinely transports produce to the Mount Vernon, Fairfax, Manassas, Dale City and Arlington farmers' markets. "Most of our customers come from within a 45-minute drive away. They know we have thornless blackberries here and they know you cannot get them on the roadside." The berry crops have traditionally been the pick-your-own fruits on the farm. They plan to feature pick-your-own apples in the future. "Many people thought of us as just a berry farm," she said. "Now with the apricots, peaches and apples, the orchard means something too." Looking for a dependable Medicare Supplement Program? One that's financially sound? One that offers local service? A real value? If you're 65, or soon will be 65, call your cou...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

10 SPRING PLANTING TIME SALE! ORDER NOW WHILE STOCKS ARE LARGE SAVE UP TO 50% HOUSE OF WESLEY, NURSERY DIVISION BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 61701 BUSHEL BASKET SIZE % PRICE SALE ££_/ CUSHION MUMS Reg.s2.ooea. A 10 For $1.98 20 For $3.75 COLORADO JL 40 For $6.95 Ri HF cp blie*E 4) _ Wonderful offer on popular Gush- U£ SSMOKE TREE ton Mums' mere are dozens of O\FT V <lil OO &S\ *f jv l/ ' 1 f*■®- fc plnk ' red ve,low blooms on everv ~*P J-«vFU *3*4*/ i k d» -1 rn 9 r ni . <j»o 7K EifSand^o W om S e«rv W ve m a°r- 3 For $2.90 ' $1.50 ea. 2* Or $2.75 with little or no care They will add 6 For $5.75 . -. -<'.Cr/i''T<r/ . *CS-' 3 For $4.00 - T 1 1 ll beautv to your garden and supply Q Fnr <RS ~ • ♦«?;VWA' 15& y6*S^L^l^XJr^ l endless floral displays for your llv- ,p Qi 'j ■) 1 in July when most other trees nave auit blooming, tne X mg room These are our choicest 18 For $16.75 * beautiful Pink Mist Smoke Tree (Cotinus ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

March, 1988 Farmers share secrets of success BY PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor WILLIAMSBURG—To make a direct marketing enterprise succeed, you must make others talk about it. Farmers accomplished at attracting customers to their businesses discussed this during the Direct Marketing Conference Jan. 21-23 at the Fort Magruder Inn. And if you don't think innovation, advertising and marketing play a big role in the success of a business, listen to what a pair of fruit farmers had to say: Mrs. Maxey said her tactics to promote their pick-your-own strawberry operation came from previous Direct Marketing Conferences. Mrs. Maxey and her husband, Henry, began attending the conferences in 1980 before they diversified their tobacco operation with strawberries. Using signs to direct customers to the farm was one of the first ideas she obtained by attending, she said. "One year the apple growers had big, three-foot-wide apple signs," she said. "I thought, 'If they can do it with apples, I can do ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

12 Tally ho! Fox hunters add pomp and circumstance to ordinary ritual By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor CHARLOTTESVILLE—When you think of hunting, images of men clad in blaze orange vests carrying shotguns come to mind. Some residents in Albemarle County, though, add some pomp and circumstance to the average hunt. Jean Beegle, manager of Brook Hill Farm, said fox hunting is one way she and her family enjoy horses. She and her husband, Charles, raise horses for hunting. The Beegles are members of the Farmington Hunt Club. Their children, Brook, Lynne and Christina, are also avid riders and participate in fox hunts when they can. Riding to the hounds is considerably different from hunting with guns or bows and arrows. It is a group sport where as many as 90 hunters can ride following a pack of hounds. Fox hunting season runs from midAugust to mid-March. Cubbing season begins during the middle of August and lasts to mid or late October. This is when young hounds are entered into the pac...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

March, 1988 Tomorrow's HARVEST Bobby Jones State YF Chairman Young Farmers set 1988 theme "Producing Tomorrow's Harvest" is the theme for the Young Farmer Program in 1988. Young farmers involved in Farm Bureau activities are developing their leadership skills to prepare themselves for leadership roles when the opportunity arises. More than 75 young farmers have chosen to attend the Statewide Young Farmer Conference Feb. 27-28 in Charlottesville. Workshops on Farm Bureau, Young Farmers Programs, farmers' markets and food science research will help those young leaders understand the organization and some of the issues it faces. The State Young Farmer Committee met Feb. 6 to set goals for 1988, finalize plans for the State Conference and make plans for 1988 activities. We will again sponsor a reception for State Farmer degree recipients at the Future Farmers of America State Convention in June. The Young Farmer Involvement Program is designed to help county young farmer committees get ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

14 WE'LL SEND YOU ONE FREE TREE To Ontuuluce lh Fosteal Gteiwwg Qualify Sluuie Ttee ut Ametica. . Hybrid VopQm At l h Pticc When you need shade in a hurry, we suggest the fast-growing Hybrid poplar. As shown in the picture — it has a handsome shape and will actually shade a ranch-type home in just 3-5 years! We haven't found any tree that grows like it. It has a spread of 30-35' and in just a few years, at maturity, it reaches 50-60'. you Don't Have Ta Baty Tlua Hybtid Poplat. It normally lives 30-50 years. It is wind, disease, and insectresistant. And it can take the cold as far north as Canada. This is not the short-lived Lombardy poplar. This poplar is often used to reforest after forest fires, and to reclaim land after strip mining. But, the best use is to provide beauty and quick, cool shade for new homes. Plaid Hybtid Poplm Tin Smearing The screen variety makes an ideal privacy hedge. It has a width of about 10' and grows to a dense screen usually in 3 years. Plant for quick w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

March, 1988 Registered Horned Dorset Rams and ewes for sale. Leon Cassell, Wytheville VA 703-228-2862. Mare, 10 years. Half Arabian, needs gentle experienced rider - $500. Floyd - 745-3485. Angus Bulls - 18 yearlings priced from $600 to $800; one to 3 years old. 703-291-2177. HANOVERIANS! - The ultimate sport horse. Breeding and performance stock, all ages. Central Manor Farm - (804) 248-6309. BLACK LABRADOR/IRISH SETTER MIXED PUPPIES. Shots and wormed. Healthy farm raised. $25.00 . (703) 825-8758 after 5 PM. Registered Charolais, 6 bred Heifers 6 7 Frame, 1 Bull, 1 Cow. Top bloodlines. (703)957-1001. Beagle AKC Puppies. Tri-color. Birth date 1/28/88. (804) 598-4030. Powhatan, VA. Pinzgauer Bull 2 1/2 years old with pedigree. Produces good calves - $750. Call (804) 672-0808 or 222-1766. NEW! Free catalog-wholesale prices. Broilers and pedigree laying breed chicks. Ducklings, turkeys, guineas, goslings. Reich Poultry Farms, Marietta, PA 17547. COLLIE PUPPIES! AKC - Lassie-type, champ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1988

If your insurance program hasn't been reviewed in the past two years, you probably don't have the coverage you think you have. |p\ > y$ f *'^ v - j ; *',0 ' ""6^*l detc' * mk i" !>-",,wi- v: ii surartee coverage and let you know where s^n^And

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

Farm Bureau Vol. 47, No. 4 Assembly session positive for farmers By NORM HYDE VFB Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—NearIy half of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's $45 million legislative budget agenda has been approved by the 1988 General Assembly. "We won significant victories on many bills and a lot more money was found for farm projects in the budget than was originally anticipated," said VFBF President Robert Delano. VFBF successfully lobbied for a bill that places bounties on the destructive coyote and helped block anti-smoking legislation under the proposed Virginia Clean Indoor Air Act. Farm Bureau lobbied against and defeated a bill raising marketing commissions charged to burley tobacco growers. The VFBF Burley Tobacco Commodity Committee estimates that FB communication links continue to grow By NORM HYDE VFB Broadcast Editor There's been an accident and you need to check your Blue Cross/Blue Shield coverage. But thanks to a recent reorganization by that agency, you can now o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

2 Opponents of constitutional convention are off base For some unknown reason, our U.S. Congress has lacked the political courage or infinite wisdom to balance the federal budget — a deficit budget that is rapidly getting out of hand. So, for the past 12 years, states have been introducing their own amendments for a balanced budget by proposing a limited constitutional convention. This is a guaranteed right found in Article V of the U.S. Constitution. It would grant a convention if two-thirds of the states called for this action and if Congress refuses to act. So far, 32 of the needed 34 states have called for this convention. Opponents, however, contend that a constitutional convention is dangerous to the welfare of our nation. They say opening up that sacred collection of legal dictum would, in essence, open a Pandora's box. Opponents say the American people couldn't stick to the matter at hand — that of establishing a law to balance the federal budget without a tax increase. No, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

April, 1988 Which comes first —the chicken or the egg? Continued from Page 1 The chickens lay their eggs in nests placed under small metal houses, preferring to lay eggs in dark areas. "Some chickens lay on the floor," Neal said. "About 92 percent of the birds go to the on-line nests." The eggs roll out of the nests onto a conveyor belt. The conveyor belt carries eggs from all three chicken houses to a central area where three workers sort the eggs to be used for hatching. These eggs will be free of debris and cracks. Eggs are also sorted by size. According to Neal, automation has made their operation more efficient. "If we were hand gathering, we would have less breakage, but we would have to have more people to do that." As the eggs come off the conveyor belt and are graded, they are placed in plastic racks. These plastic racks fill large metal racks. Afterwards they are sanitized with formaldehyde for 20 minutes. The cleaned eggs are cooled to 65 degrees. From here hatcheries pic...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

4 Amherst County vulture problem goes in circles AMHERST—Warmer temperatures and the end of calving have relieved the black vulture problem in Amherst County. Two county farmers suffered losses earlier in the year when black vultures began preying on calves. One farmer lost eight calves. "The vultures were attacking the calves as they were being born, when they were vulnerable," county extension agent William Seay said. Hundreds of the birds have been reported roosting in the region. "Black vultures come into the area and roost in certain spots right around the town of Amherst," Seay said. According to Peter Bromley, wildlife extension agent at Virginia Tech, Amherst County is a "traditional roost" for the birds. 'The roosts are usually associated with bluffs and bluffs are frequently around rivers," he said. "Amherst County is on the James River." Colder weather prompts black vultures to roost, he said. 'They tend to congregate in winter and spread out in the summer to find nesting...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

April, 1988 Pamphlets educate employers, workers In an effort to educate employers and their workers about field sanitation requirements, the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry is publishing pamphlets explaining the new regulations. According to Jean Guthrie, assistant director of Public Affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, these pamphlets will be distributed to several Farm Bureau leaders and county offices on the Eastern Shore, Southside Virginia, Northern Virginia and the Roanoke Valley area. "Farm Bureau leaders who have an interest in labor intensive commodities will receive copies," she said. 'There will be 25 copies sent to 30 county offices. These counties were selected because their farmers grow labor intensive crops." Two booklets will be mailed out. The first one is entitled "What Every Virginia Farm Employer Needs To Know About Requirements For Field Sanitation Facilities." Ms. Guthrie said this book contains a detailed overview about the new field san...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

6 Virginia distillery is in good spirits By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor RESTON —If all there was to marketing good whiskey was bottling rye, barley malt and corn and labeling it, then Virginia Gentleman Bourbon would sell itself. However, the family-owned A. Smith Bowman Distillery has discovered that there are other challenges of selling their product in today's marketplace. Antialcohol campaigns and competition from other alcoholic beverages have made their marks, but nothing has had a greater impact than the finnicky consumer's preference. "All we have to sell is taste," said Robert E. Lee IV. "It's tough to sell taste, so we sell image." Image is something the vice-president of marketing knows quite a bit about. The famous names behind the brand reflect the tradition of excellence Virginia Gentleman has been known for. Lee himself is the great-grandson of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The family tree of the founder of the distillery, A. Smith Bowman, boasted relatives servin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

April, 1988 Henry County teacher cultivates profits By PENNA PLYMIRE VFB News Editor AXTON— Money doesn't grow on trees, but one vocational-agricultural teacher has found the next best thing — a way to grow profits. Deborah Barker, a teacher at Laurel Park High School in Henry County, has established a florist shop and greenhouse which she couples with academics. "It's the only program in the county," she said. "It's gotten a lot of praise." But the horticultural program provides more than practical training for her students. It actually provides the funds to run her program. 'There is an agricultural production program at Laurel Park," she said. "I taught that program for three years. I wanted to switch to the horticulture program where I would be able to generate a lot of my own income." The enterprise has done well, she said. 'The county gave me $400 to run the Drug scare could hurt state pork profits Virginia hog farmers may see the image of their product even further tarnished ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1988

8 Let The Virginia Farm Bureau Complete \sur Family Picture With the Security Our Health Care Protection Offers. . ; '*• *. ffi "*f ■ '*fßf RHi jjij^l \ J®MWH Jaßr mm T \ lR V j| ggt jfij As health care costs continue to climb, you need to make sure that your entire family has adequate protection. Your local County Farm Bureau office is the best place to shop for all your health insurance needs. The Virginia Farm BureauHealth Care Program offers you a choice of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Virginia plans at affordable monthly rates. We've taken some of the best health benefits available and included features that make them work cost-effectively for you. More important, Farm Bureau plans automatically adjust to meet any increases in the cost of health care. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Virginia FARM BUREAU NEWS Also, you'll like the prescription drug benefits included with your coverage. Our plastic drug card makes having prescriptions filled more convenient, simply because in most...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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