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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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OUR PARIS SNAPSHOTS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

OUR PARIS SNAPSHOTS     BELTS and necklaces made of flat- tened celluloid dahlias are French fashion details, and Chanel's evening necklaces of tiny nosegays of field flowers strung together are something to look forward to wearing in the spring. * * * BELTS, belts of strong leather, and suede studded with metal like a horse's harness, braided copper, knitted and crocheted wool, and still string ones. * * * IT is smarter to wear a colored hat with a black dress than with a colored one. * * * HIGH-CROWNED hats still continue to come out of Paris salons. The newest is Agnes' postillon sailor, with a narrow brim and very high, sloping crown. * * * INSPIRATIONS from the 1900 sil- houette are dresses that have ruffles all over or at the bottom of their skirts for the evening. Gibson Girl shirt-waists and skirts minus straight fronts are romping around Jean Patou's hats with birds on them,   and Molyneux's toques with paradise plumes. Tulle and organ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MOTHERS and Young WIVES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

MOTHERS and Young WIVES By a DOCTOR Every mother or mother-to-be should read this column weekly. It will con- tain invaluable medical advice, written by a well-known doctor, upon every phase of baby welfare. A HEALTH HINT It is for the young wife to realise that the food she has, while pregnant, goes to build up the precious life she is shortly to present to the world. If the mother's diet is wrong and is deficient in proper vitamin supply, the child will probably suffer. Every mother-to-be should have about a pint of milk a day and partake liber- ally of fresh fruits, salads, butter, cheese and similar foods. This does not mean that a vegetarian 'diet is best, for fresh meat once a day is both appetising and useful. Eggs, too, are a valuable food, rich in essential properties. THAT SCHOOL LUNCH THE question of what the school-child   should have for lunch is of interest to mothers, and it has come up for dis- cussion in medical journals within recent months. Writers ha...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CHATS ON SHOPS AND THINGS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

CHATS ON SHOPS AND THINGS By SAIDE It is not so easy to make a choice from the crowds of delect- able items on every side, so, in very practical frame of mind, the "Shopping Sleuth" focuses mainly on items for warmth this week. But, being also a feminine sleuth, a thought or two must be spared for notions, artistic, intriguing, and modish, too. Finishings That Sparkle "Tailors and writers must mind the fashion," says our old friend, Pepys, in his famous diary. Then a word about the intriguing nickel and brass buttons, buckles and belts is certainly incumbent on the scribe. They are, I rather fancy, the obvious out- come of the mili- tary influence that has been so appar- ent in our fashions of late. And it is curious to note how they conform to all the other notions of the latest vogue. Gleaming buttons confer a very dashing finish to A sporting or to a formal outfit. But the more searching consideration to which I subjected a display of these trifles yesterday disclosed the pleasin...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

SHE TOLD IT TO Sweeney! silly looking rubber doll? I've never       seen it round tho nursery before.               Oh so that grouchy Sweeney boy         gave it to you, did he? First time               I ever saw him give anybody any-         thing! Lemmelook at it!" *"Funniest looking doll I ever saw!       Why, it's got that same cross-patch look to its face that Sweeney's got— see? There must be something pretty     bad the matter with him. He acts as       crabby as you did the day Granny put the wrong baby powder on you!"     &am...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
PROBLEMS of LIFE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

PROBLEMS of LIFE         Everyone who lives meets much the same prob- lems. Many readers of this fascinating column of Life's Problems will find them hauntingly familiar. And yet—how did yours end? Every reader of The Australian Women's Weekly who has a problem to By "The Matron"   Australian tr omen s rr on.ij " - r J , , , . fr""h "drice. face and solve is invited to submit it to us for helpful, frank advuce. While The Australian Women's Weekly will help with the utmost sincerity and good faith, it cannot, of course, accept any respon- sibility. This week I am giving copies of answers which I have given to people who have personally sought my advice on various matters recently. Old Flame Returns TEN YEARS AGO the man to whom I was engaged left Sydney without a word to me. He has returned, and has written reminding me of the old friendship, and asking me to see bim. He makes no mention of his wife and child who are in...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
EVERY PICTURE and EVERY THEATRE "TO-DAY WE LIVE" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

EVERY PICTURE and EVERY THEATRE - "TO-DAY WE LIVE" JOAN CRAWFORD, Franckot Tone, and Robert Young are particularly well cast as a sister, brother, and sister's fiance (out of kindness, as a fiance is a lifelong playmate and brother's best friend), respectively, and Gary Cooper, as the sister's real love, has no particu- lar faults. So that, if one doesn't think that war stories are out-of-date, and is not bored by a plot which stands still for long periods, "To-day We Live" is a more-than-average show. The air and sea battles, although unnecessarily long, are really quite enthralling. Joan Crawford has the usual tragic role, but is unlike herself in that most of the time she wears uniform instead of exotic   fashions. The playing of the "March Militaire" on the concert grand by Isidor Good- man during the interval is sufficient reason alone for visiting St. James. —St. James. EYES of youth, and wine, and beauty. "To-night Is Ours" is Fredric March's and Claudette Col- b...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
"A BILL OF DIVORCEMENT" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

"A BILL OF DIVORCEMENT" UNFORTUNATELY the producers have jumped at the opportunity to   pile on the agony given by Clemence Dane's "Bill of Divorcement," but this production is well worth seeing. In its cast are John Barrymore, as the shell- shocked husband who returns to his former wife (played by Billie Burke), to discover that she is about to re-marry, and Paul Cavanagh, who, as usual, is a fascinating lover. The supporting feature is, in contrast, a cheerful comedy, bright and amus- ing, and practically plotless, including Sally Eilers, James Dunn, Victor Jory, and Sammy Cohen. —Regent, at end of week. "42nd STREET* * IT was Warner Bros. who sponsored Al. Jolson's "Jazz Singer," follow- ing with numerous musical films until the public taste was sickened. But "42nd Street," opening at the State Theatre at the end of the week, is a new type of musical show, and most attractive. Based on a story of theatrical life by Bradford Ropes, the cast includes War- ner Baxter, B...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
A Few STOLEN MOMENTS with "The Squatter's Daughter": Behind the Scenes with our New Screen Beauty She's Got Troubles But She Loves Them [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Grant Lyndsay, the juvenile male lead in the new talkie was last seen in Sydney in "The Barretts of Wimpole Street." This is Jocelyn Howarth, the Sydney girl who was discovered on the amateur stage and en- gaged to star in Cinesound's "The Squatter's Daughter." Miss Howarth   in a very mod-   ern riding hat. Owen Ainley and Cath. Esler also appear in the new Austra- lian talkie. Some of the   most magnifi- cent photo- graphy yet seen in any film characterises   this new pro- duction. A Few STOLEN MOMENTS with   "The Squatter's Daughter" : Behind the Scenes   with our New Screen Beauty     She's Got Troubles But She Loves Them THE energy and will-to-win fos- tered in Jocelyn Howarth, star of "The Squatter's Daughter" during the many years that she was captain of tennis at her school (St. Gabriel's) is needed now she is in talkies. For there is no more misguided impression of a film...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

S^y^f^^^^^tKm^r^VtVr^^S^^KS^^BS^BBI |4 Sessions, 11, 2, | 5, & 8. 'Phone                     |MA1000 for Re-         | serves. Seats till               | 4.30 1/- to 2/7;                     |after 4.30, 1/6 to 3/5                   nraMnr 41 FARRELL   For General Exhibition   FOX PICTURE         and on the same programme       MARY ASTOR |"THOSE LIL...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THINGS THAT HAPPEN [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Where Nellie Stewart Played PEOPLE who take a short-cut down Hosking Place from Castlereagh Street to Pitt Street, Sydney, do not realise the historical associations of the place. It is named after the Hosking who was first Mayor of Sydney, and whose house, with a well-treed garden, used to face Pitt Street. The place, itself, was a residential street in the old days of Sydney, and be- cause of the proximity to the theatres, the terrace of small houses there be- came quite theatrical. A little girl often seen sitting on the doorstep of the third house down rose to great fame. She is Nellie Stewart. Walter Baker was born in another of the houses.—"Gee Vee." * * * Know What You Wear ONE sees all manner of curious trim- mings, culled from Oriental designs, and so on, but I wonder how many people consider just what the interpre- tation of a smart buckle or medallion may be. I was in the north of Queens- land some time ago, and on my hat—a model to which I was particularly at- tached—was...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
...WHAT MY PATIENTS ASK ME [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

WHAT MY PATIENTS         ASK ME BY A DOCTOR In the quietness of every doctor's surgery patients ask their questions with perfect confidence in the man upon whom they rely for health, for reassurance, and sometimes for life. Every medical man could tell a fascinating story of thes patients and these questions: and "one of Sydney's best known medical men" will tell anonymously every week in this column of questions his patients ask him—questions on matters which will be of the greatest importance and practical value to every girl and woman. WOMEN'S FOOD Question: What is the best food for an expectant mother? An overwhelming amount of work has been done in food research during the past decade. In the forefront of the movement has been Professor Mel- lanby and his wife, whose fame is world wide. They have recently shown that where vitamin A is low in the diet, in- fection attacks the patient. Further research is pointing to the fact t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
what to eat in WINTER [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

By KATHLEEN RICE COLD winter days mean a replanning of menus in order that the child-   ren shall receive extra nourishment, and the workers, leaving home early in the morning and returning often late at night, perhaps thoroughly tired out and not inclined for food, shall be tempted with dishes calculated to please the palate, and supply the carbo-hydrates that   form energy for the body to carry on its functions with the ease that we term good health. The home-maker has so many duties to perform in the home that often in the caring for others she is apt to overlook her own welfare. This is a big mistake, and the first point for her to remember is that when mother is not up to par, everything else in the house suffers accordingly. With curtailed incomes there are many people whose first thought in cutting down expenses is to economise in the kitchen. Such a proceeding is unadul-   terated folly. Food, plenty of it, the   right kind...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Loose Swagger Coats Shoulders Cut Too Wide [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Loose Swagger Coats Shoulders Cut Too Wide WITH the cold weather so far advanced, it is, of course, of no value at this halfway point of the season to discuss items of a winter wardrobe. Cold weather gar- ments have already been pur- chased, and at this date are no doubt living up to your most optimistic expectations, or, what is more likely, considering the shallow purses of all, sadly realising your gravest misgivings. It is my intention this week to dis- cuss clothes which are not light enough for summer days, but which will be suitable for that nebulous period of the year that lies between winter and sum- mer. It is then that the weather man seems to grow moody, and a wide varia- tion of temperature is the result. You can practically take your choice of spring coats this year. Every type of coat imaginable is good. You will find horsey tweeds and wool mixtures, utili- tarian affairs that will go with any frock. Coats dripping with fur and coats with no fur at all. Full length an...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FASHION PARADE Jessie Tait [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

The FASHION PARADE By Jessie Tait Here's a beige cape model with a difference. Notice the brown and beige printed blouse with long sleeves, the cape that is faced with the same printed silk, the slim straight skirt. The belt is pieces of brown wood strung together Schiaparelli makes the three-quar- ter length coat and its accompany- ing skirt of a grey pin-striped wool, with a shoulder yoke on the coat which is frankly too broad, and a small turnover collar close around the neck. The over-large patch pockets are an important note. The coat is fastened up the left front with three wooden cylin- ders and loops. The cardigan suit of navy blue soft Angora-woollen is animated by a scarf, hat, and gloves of navy blue rough silk printed with white spots. The coat has a square shoulder yoke and V-shaped tucks in sunray design. The accessories could be made in red and white checked pique for a change. SHOES.—Braided gold and silver kid strap sandal to wear with al- most any evening dress. YO...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MARVELLOUS DESIGNS from VIENNA JUMPERS by EUROPE'S Fashion Leaders [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

MARVELLOUS DESIGNS from VIENNA JUMPERS by EUROPE'S Fashion Leaders KNITTED jumpers that will prove an attractive ad- junct to every smart wardrobe will be featured by The Aus- tralian Women's Weekly to sup- plement a fashion service from the most famous European salons. Stereotyped ideas of "purl and plain" will be completely eclipsed by these exclusive models of the Viennese vogue. If you want something that is different— something that is worn by the smartest women in London, Paris, and Vienna—follow this series each week. It will include the pull-over of tailored design worn on the golf links by the Prince of Wales. The Lido With its quaintly puffed sleeves in two-tone effect and softly ribbed front, the "Lido" makes its bow as the first of the series. Materials: 5 skeins beige, 2 skeins green 2 ply. wool, pair No. 13 steel needles, pair No. 10 bone needles, No. 1 steel crochet hook. Measurements: Length 19in., bust 34in., sleeve seam 6½in. Tension: 9 sts. to the inch in width, 2...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE CHARM AND WIT OF MRS. LYONS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

THE CHARM AND WIT OF MRS. LYONS SINCERITY, eloquence, and a wmning personality give a rare charm to the speeches of Mrs. J. A. Lyons, and usually she drives home her points with a humorous illustration which has a pecu- liarly feminine appeal. When speaking to an immense audi- ence of women at the Randwick Town Hall, she emphasised the necessity for trying to see the other person's view- point, and this is how she pointed her plea for tolerance: "When I was young and before I had placed my feet on the broad path that leadeth to obesity, I used to feel extremely flattered when anyone took particular notice of me. It made me think how nice I was! Now, if I see anyone looking at me, I think, 'Good Heavens! What's wrong?' "Yet," she added, smiling, "probably the looks cast at me were really the same looks, but my viewpoint had al- tered and that made all the difference!" By the way, here is a feminine adden- dum on the many charms of Mrs. Lyons. She has the loveliest small, dimpled hand...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WHY not an AUSTRALIAN CONDUCTOR? Radio Commission's Opportunity [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

WHY not an AUSTRALIAN CONDUCTOR?   Radio Commission's Opportunity By SARABAND Now that Malcolm Sergeant is not to arrive, it might not do any harm for the Commission lo look around our own country and see what is available in the conduct- ing line. Two names, Howard Carr and Alfred Hill at once rise to the mind. Both are men who have had considerable con- ducting experience overseas, and who in composition at least are probably Ser- geant's equal, if not superior. One realises that there is big publi- city attached to the importation of a "specially en- gaged musician," but that need not blind our eyes to the worth of those near at hand. It is the same in opera. People are often brought in who are definitely inferior to Austra- lia's own. What a Alfred Hill world-famous cast, Australia could   produce of its opera stars of the last 10 years. There would be Melba leading the van with Austral close at hand. Men like Brownlee, Horace Stevens, Harold Williams, ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Balmoral Beach Club's 13th [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

Balmoral Beach Club's 13 th Mosman folk looked askance when Mrs. S. McNaughton, wife of the president of Balmoral Beach Club, an- nounced that she intended to make the club's thirteenth annual ball, held in Warringah Hall, Neutral Bay, last Thursday night, "the best yet." But this capable lady defied hoodoos and superstition and all of that sort of thing, and went along with the arrange- ments. She decorated the big hall her- self, and then set to work on the official table. The hem of the tablecloth she decorated with heads of black cats and witches, and lucky horse-shoes to ward off bad luck, and before each guest she placed a lucky black cat. The ball was ' the biggest success in the series yet held.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
"PACIFIC PERIL" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

"PACIFIC PERIL" MOST books on international affairs are written in a manner that does not especially appeal to women. This is not the case with a new book on the increasing power of Japan, written by E. George Marks. It is far from the author's purpose to be a war-monger, or to rouse the bogey cry of the yellow peril simply for the sake of sensationalism. The book is a thoughtful essay on what is un- doubtedly a grave position, to which too little attention is given by Australians.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 10 June 1933

PHILIP HARGRAVE is an Adelaide boy who has been acclaimed "the ten-year-old musical sensation of Australia," and for whom is predicted a world career among the greatest musicians of the day. JOHN BROWNLEE, his wife, and daughter. His daughter is also a god-daughter of the late Dame Nellie Melba. Brownlee himself was a protege of Melba. He will broadcast from Station 2FC on Thursday, June 8.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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