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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A LETTER AND ITS POSTSCRIPT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A LETTER AND ITS POSTSCRIPT. He asked his love to marry him,   By letter she replied;   He read her firm refusal.   Then shot himself and died.   He might have been alive to-day,   And she his happy bride,   If he had read the postscript   Upon the other side.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A PREHISTORIC GIANT FAMILY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A PREHISTORIC GIANT FAMILY.     From an Aztec mound remains of a gigantic prehistoric family—husband, wife and a child six months of age—have been recovered. The re- mains, comprising all three of the skulls, por- tions of the thigh bones of the man, and almost all of the pelvis of the woman, indicate a stature for the man of 7ft. or 8ft., and for the woman 6ft. or 7ft., while the child must have measured at least 4ft. With the bones of the man was a big bowl of Aztec black and red pottery, which had evidently been held in the hollow of the el- bow, while a similar bowl had evidently been placed over the face of the woman—the inference being that these tribal bowls played an impor- tant part in the Aztec burial ceremonies. With the bones of the Aztec giantess was the big nurs- ing bottle of her child, fashioned of the finest Aztec clay, and containing a small quantity of cheese, which had formed from the milk with which the bottle was filled in prehistoric ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POISONING AND DIVORCE. SEQUEL TO A CELEBRATED CASE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

POISONING AND DIVORCE. SEQUEL TO A CELEBRATED CASE. The celebrated Hall poisoning case of 1886 was revived on December 6th, at the Auckland Su- preme Court, when Kate Emily Hall, whose hus- band was in that year sentenced to penal servi- tude for life for attempting to poison her, made an application for the dissolution of marriage under clause 4 of the Divorce Act of 1898. The clause in question gives permission for an application for divorce on the grounds that the respondent has been convictcd and sentenced to imprisonment or penal servitude for seven years or upwards for attempting to take the life of the petitioner. Mrs. Hall, who appeared in the witness box neatly attired in black, and wearing a rather heavy black veil, and who was visibly agitated when reference was made to her husband, said that she was married to the respondent in St. Mary's School Church, Timaru, on May 26, 1885. They lived together at Timaru, and there was one child—a boy, born in 1886—as an issue of the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SEA DOGS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

THE SEA DOGS. It was after midnight when the storm let up,   almost as suddenly as it had begun. I got up and   went to the front window, in time to see the moon slit its way through the clouds, that drew back on either side, leaving it in a widening pool of   clear blue darkness. The surf still thundered   high across the beach road, but the wind had   stopped screaming, and I began to feel that I could bear it now, though I knew I should not   sleep until Alan came.   As I stood there something out beyond the   breakers caught my eyes, a dark dot making   steadily for the shore. A moment later it was   flung upon the beach. It lay still for a second,   then crawled up out of the way of the waves, and   I saw by the moonlight that it was a great gaunt   dog. He stood with legs apart and drooping head, his body heavi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LIFE OF A GUN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

  THE LIFE OF A GUN.     Experiments have been carried out by the Ordnance Board of the British War Office in con-     nection with the new 9-inch wire-wound breech-     loading quick-firing guns mounted at Dover to     determine the possible maximum rapidity of fire     and the life of the weapon. One of the guns     was selected for the experiment. Theoretic-     ally the life of such a gun is about 80 rounds,     but 161 rounds were discharged from this     weapon. Heavy projectiles were employed in     some instances, weighing 450lb. After several   rounds had been fired the rifling of the gun     was seriously impaired by corrosion, so that the   &nbs...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A POINT OF ETIQUETTE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A POINT OF ETIQUETTE.   It is one of the rules of good form nowadays to use the spoon as little as possible, the fork taking its place on all possible occasions. Stiff creams and puddings are eaten with a fork, fruit stones and the stones of olives are re- moved with a fork, and so forth. Americans use the fork even more than we do. The dainti- est among them will cut up a small portion of the meat on their plate, then lay the knife aside and use the fork only, cut up another portion, and proceed in the same way until they have finished their helping.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DOG WORTH HAVING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A DOG WORTH HAVING. Charles Sutton, of Upper Roxborough, U.S.A., has a dog named Mack that got into print a year ago through the fact that when a trolley car cut off his tail he took the severed member in hie mouth, and, carrying it indoors, laid it at his master's feet with a sad bark. A month back Mack again distinguished himself. His mistress lost her pocketbook, and said to the dog: " Mack, I want you to find my   pocketbook. and bring it home to me. Do you hear?" She did not suppose the dog would obey her, but that night, very late, Mack, who had been gone for hours, scratched at the door and whined. The door was opened to him, and he rushed in with the pocketbook in his mouth.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IMPROVEMENTS IN CHAMPAGNE MANUFACTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

IMPROVEMENTS IN CHAMPAGNE     MANUFACTURE. Certain improvements have been introduced in champagne manufacture. As is well known, the wine is bottled and placed in racks in an inclined position. The bottles are turned regu- larly, the idea being to cause all the impurities in the wine to reach the cork. The old cork is finally removed at a certain stage of the process in order that the final liquoring and corking may be done. Formerly it was the universal practice in the momentary removal of the cork to allow the deposit to be sprayed out by the pressure of gas with just enough of the contents of the bottle to remove the substance, which would be cloudy, and damage the wine. Of late years an ingenious freezing machine has been introduced to freeze solid a thin wedge next the cork of just the needed thickness to remove all that need not remain. This reduces the waste of wine from 8 per cent. to 12 per cent.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DID COLUMBUS DISCOVER AMERICA? SOME REMARKABLE FACTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

DID COLUMBUS     DISCOVER AMERICA?   —♦—       SOME REMARKABLE FACTS.   Almost at the moment of the proclamation of a new Prince of Wales comes intelligence which, if correct, brings additional honor to that land. Major E. H. Cooper, the well-known explorer of the home of the cliff-dwellers, has announced in Chicago his discovery of evidences of a Welsh settlement in America before the time of Colum- bus. Major Cooper was exchanging greetings with Creek Indians when his two Welsh com- panions began to criticise the Indian camp in Welsh. Suddenly the oldest chief stopped, listened, and then ran to the Welshmen, and em- braced them, speaking to them rapidly in Creek —which they did not understand—and then more slowly pronouncing words which made them start and stare in amazement. The Indian was speaking Welsh! Subsequently the chief related a tradition of the tribe. It appears that many years ag...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROMANCE OF THE COBINTHIAN COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

ROMANCE OF THE CORINTHIAN COLUMN. —«— In the winter a young girl had died in Corinth. Some time afterward her maid gathered together   various trinkets and playthings which the girl   had loved and brought them to the girl's grave.   There she placed them in a basket near the monument, and placed a large square tile upon the basket to prevent the wind from overturning   it. It happened that under the basket was a root   of an acanthus plant. When spring came the   acanthus sprouted; but its shoots were not   able to pierce the basket, and accordingly they   grew around it, having the basket in their midst.   Such of the long leaves as grew up against the   four protruding corners of the tile on the top   of the basket curled round under these corners and formed pretty volutes. Kallimachos, the sculptor, walking that way one day, saw this, and...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PARISIAN ROMANCE. MERCHANT AND WIFE. MEET AFTER LOVING LETTERS. AND PART AT THE POLICE STATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

PARISIAN ROMANCE.           MERCHANT AND WIFE. —♦— MEET AFTER LOVING LETTERS. AND PART AT THE POLICE STATION. Each was sighing for a kindred spirit, for a heart which would beat in unison with his and her own; and on the strength of the proclama- tion of this interesting desire the couple met by appointment; but sentiment disappeared as if by magic, and fists and nails were plied with tre- mendous effect, to the bewilderment of the spec- tators of the strange scene. Such, at least, is the story which was related a short time ago in the Parisian press, and it cer- tainly serves as a warning to those rather con- fiding people who advertise their affection, and expect to have their longing for a faithful com- panion satisfied after a single mysterious inter- view. The hero of this queer adventure, which was   destined to be attended with such exciting con- sequences, was a merchant in very comfortable circums...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUAINT NAVAL CUSTOM. HOISTING THE WEDDING WREATH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

QUAINT NAVAL CUSTOM.   HOISTING THE WEDDING WREATH   An old custom obtains in the Royal Navy by which the marriage of an officer is signalled by the hoisting of a wreath of flowers with silken streamers on the vessel to which he belongs. For the first time since the new Royal Yacht Vic- toria and Albert was commissioned, the custom has recently been carried out on that vessel, in honor of the marriage of her first lieutenant (Lieut. Mansell) to Miss Louisa Richards, the daughter of a naval captain. At night the wreath was beautifully illuminated with the electric light. The sketch is from a photograph taken at Southsea.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BIG FRENCH WARSHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A BIG FRENCH WARSHIP. The new armored French cruiser "Leon Gam- betta," which has been constructed at the Brest dockyard, will shortly be launched. She is the largest vessel in the French navy. Her length between perpendiculars is 450ft.; beam, 65ft.; and displacement, 12,550 tons. She is to be fitted with tubular boilers, and three triple expansion en- gines of the vertical type, driving triple screws, and developing 27,500 horse-power, capable of producing a speed of 22 knots. She will carry four heavy guns in pairs, mounted in turrets, fore and aft, 40 quick-firing guns of various calibres, and five torpedo tubes, two of which will be under water. Her officers and crew will number 730 men. The cruiser will not be commissioned until 1903, and by that time over £1,200,000 will have been expended upon her.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DICKENS AND PICKWICK. SOME STRIKING DISCOVERIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

DICKENS AND PICKWICK. SOME STRIKING DISCOVERIES. (PERCY FITZGERALD, IN THE "DAILY MAIL.")     No cause celebre in real life is so familiarly   known, even to the "man in the street," as the   fictitious one of Bardell v. Pickwick. The mere   allusions, such as "What the soldier said," the   "extra double million magnifying glasses," and,   above all, the "Chops and tomato sauce"—to say   nothing of the immortal warming pan—these   are part of the current coinage of the news-   papers.   The case and its details were, it seems, model-   led after that of Norton v. Melbourne, which had   caused a great sensation only a short time be-   fore. The trivial letters relied upon were paro-   died in the "Chops and tomato sauce" love let-   tcrs. Lord Melbourne was as innocent as Mr. &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY SO SAD? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

WHY SO SAD? "He's an awfully sad-looking man; what's the matter?" "Oh, he's had a terrible time. When he was a boy he fell in love with one of the best girls in the world, and—" "What a heartless wretch she must have been." "Why?" "Why? To jilt a decent chap like that." "But she didn't. She married him. That's why he's so sad."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW AMERICAN BIBLE. PUBLISHED IN CHICAGO. SOME INTERESTING COMPARISONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

A NEW AMERICAN BIBLE. PUBLISHED IN CHICAGO. SOME INTERESTING COMPARISONS. For 10 years 20 persons in Chicago, who wisely veil themselves under the name of "The Translators." have been preparing a version of the New Testament in "modern English." In the 24th chapter of St. Matthew's gospel, the familiar words "the abomination of desola- tion" become in the hands of the Chicago translators, "the desecrating horror." If "The Translators" (says the "London Express") had put forward their version as anything but a "New Testament," it might have passed muster as a handbook for junior scholars in an American Sunday-school, but they have the impudence to suggest that their compilation is fitted to take the place of the English Bible. One of the last of many extracts is too apt to be missed. The reading given by the transla- tors for Revelation xvii. 9 is:—   "Here is an opportunity for the intelligent reader to show discernment."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE WIVES ARE WHIPPED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

WHERE WIVES ARE WHIPPED.   In Russia wives are very much in subjection   to their husbands. In a circulated book written   by the Russian priest, Pope Sylvester, who lived   in the 16th century, corporeal punishment is advo-   cated, not only on account of its religious pro-   priety, but also as of benefit to their health.   What the women may think of it is another   matter, but certainly the Russian branch of the   Greek Church seems to believe that if you spare   the rod you spoil the wife. Until recent years   a rod or whip has formed part of a bride's trous-   seau, and in some districts her first wifely duty   was to humbly remove her husband's boots, in   one of which she found a whip.   A custom which obtained in other parts of the   country was for the bridegroom to gi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHICAGO VERSION. AUTHORISED VERSION. ST. MATTHEW, Chapter V., Verses 14 and 15. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

CHICAGO VERSION. AUTHORISED VERSION. ST. MATTHEW. Chapter V., Verses 14 and 15. It is you who are the Light of the world. It is impossible for a town that stands on a hill to escape notice. Nor do people light a lamp and cover it over, but they put it on the lamp-stand, where it gives light to everyone in the house. Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. ST. MATTHEW, Chapter VI., Verses 9 to 13. You, therefore, are to pray in this way— Our heavenly Father, May thy Name be held holy, thy Kingdom come, and thy will be done— on earth, as in Heaven. Give us to-day our bread for the day before us; And forgive us our debts, as we, too, have forgiven our debtors, And do not take us into temptation, but rescue us from Evil. After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in Heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOVEL POWER STORAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

NOVEL POWER STORAGE. An interesting little story was told some time ago of someone in the practically waterless parts of Western America, where there is barely suffi- cient water for drinking purposes, who proposed to drive, or was actually driving, a number of ar- rastras by sand, the latter turning a large over-   shot wheel, taking the place of water. The in- tention was at first to run the arrastras by means of a large windmill, but the uncertainty of this power finally led to the adoption of the plan men- tioned. A windmill still was to form part of the scheme, but it was to run a conveyer to carry the sand up to a large elevated tank. From this the sand was to be eventually allowed to run out upon the overshot wheel, causing it to revolve just as it would under the weight of a stream of water, and the sand tank had sufficient storage capacity to ensure continuous running of the plant. There the tale ended, though a few more particulars of the right kind would have...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Startling "Resurrection." DROLL SEQUEL TO A SUPPOSED DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 28 December 1901

Startling "Resurrection."   DROLL SEQUEL TO A SUPPOSED DEATH. A few weeks ago an Armenian, while walking in the bazaar of Adana, in Asia Minor, fell on the pavement in a fit. The people in his vicinity, finding him unconscious, sent for the municipal physician, who examined him and certified that he was dead. He was recognised as being an Armenian, so his body was handed over to the authorities of a neighboring Armenian church. There was not enough money in his pockets to pay for the expense of his burial, so the authorities post- poned the funeral to the next day, by which time they hoped to be able to collect enough money from charitable Armenians. The body was put in a coffin and left in a corner of the church. At night, however, the man returned to his senses, and, finding himself in a coffin, the nar- rowest of all prisons, began to shriek wildly. His voice and the clattering of the coffin awoke the priest and attendants, who were sleeping in an adjacent building. ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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