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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. THE event of the month will, to all appearances be the rendering of " Elias" by the Oratorio Society, on the 25th. Not only will the full choral strength of the society be entered, but the soloists will be Madame Eugenie Pappenheim, Miss Adelaide Phillips, Mr. Myron W. Whitney, and Mr. A. E. Stoddard. From this it will be evident to every music lover what a treat may be expected. " Elias" is a favorite oratorio with the New York public. Its grand choral passages and the exquisite solo parts render it at once the most powerful of Mendelssohn's compositions. It will, moreover, no doubt attract a full and delighted audience this time, and we are happy to notice that it becomes more and more fashionable to attend these musical treats. If our so-called " fashionable " society could be induced to visit these amusements instead of sensational dramas, the gain in real aesthetic feeling would be immense. We hope to record, in the notice of this oratorio, another grand su...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

THE LIBRARY. THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF MOLIERE ; translated by Henri Van Laun. New Edition. Three Vols. Cloth. Bvo. Philadelphia: Gebbie & Barrie. Price, $10.50. These volumes form the initial series of a " Gentleman's Illustrated Library," which the publishers propose to issue in monthly volumes. The outward getup is very excellent, as are the engravings, and if the Library is continued as it has begun, it will undoubtedly be, as its name implies, a most desirable literary volume for gentlemen of education. The work of M. Van Laun has been sufficiently criticized. His great felicity of expression, and his fidelity of rendering, place him among the foremost of English translators. Moliere, moreover, is one of the few French authors with whom every educated gentleman must have some acquaintance. No other French dramatist has so vividly portrayed character, none other has written so enjoyable and so pure comedies. "Tartuffe," "Le Misanthrope," and " Sganarelle " will remain cl...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

SHAVINGS. SCENE in one of the village schools. School marm, having occasion to administer the a dose of the oil of birch, applies it with the palm of her hand ; youngster goes to his seat muttering, " Next time by golly, I'll put some tacks in my breeches."— Ex. THE D —L AND THE FASHIONABLE YOUNG LADY. [From the Harvard Lampoon.] The D—l, having felt that Lent, by putting an end to dancing, was depriving him of one of his choicest snares for the allurement of the young, determined to get up a set of afternoon dancing-parties to be known as the "Snapping Turtles," relying on the natural perspicuity of the female mind to distinguish between a waltz in the afternoon and one in the evening. Accordingly, disguised as an eligible parti, he accosted a beautiful and fashionable young lady of the Episcopalian faith on the doorsteps of Trinity. Having asked if she had any objections to dancing during the holy season, the pretty devotee held up her little hands in pious horror. " O, I don't me...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE SAUCER IN OUR SYSTEM. AN ANECDOTE OF WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 April 1878

THE SAUCER IN OUR SYSTEM. AN ANECDOTE OF WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON. A CLEVELAND correspondent of the Chicago Tribune sends that paper the following extract from a letter by the late Francis Lieber: "An incident of more than usual interest occurred to-day, just after the class in constitutional law was dismissed, at the university. I had been lecturing upon the advantages of the bi-cameral system, had dismissed the class, and was about to leave the room when a young man, whom I knew had taken instructions under Laboulaye, in Paris, approached me, and said that what I had urged in regard to the bi-cameral system reminded him of a story which he had heard Laboulaye relate. I was interested, of course, and, as the class gathered around,, he proceeded with the following: "Laboulaye said, in one of his lectures, that Jefferson, who had become so completely imbued with French ideas as even to admire the uni-cameral system of legislation, one day visited Washington at Mt. Vernon, and, in the...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, MAY Ist, 1878. No. 15. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, CHARLES H. CROW, '7B, Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. H. G. PAINE, '79. W. B. PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, ... - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - -15 cts. Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. IT gives us great pleasure to announce authoritatively that the trustees have, after long consultation decided upon the immediate erection of a new college building. The plans have already been made by the architect, and, as soon as they have been finally adopted by the trustees we hope to publish them as an extra supplement to the SPECTATOR. The general features of the building have been correctly stated in our last. It will occupy the Madison Avenue side of the block, and be 200 feet long and 55 feet wide. At the corner of 49th Street there will be an octagonal tower, while that on the corner of 50th Street will be square. In appearance the new building will somewhat resemble the new School of Mines. Each professor will have a lecture-room and a class-room, and no effort will be spared to make all interior arrangements first-class. The small building now occupied by the faculty room etc. will be torn down, but the old college building will remain present. It is exp...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE MYSTERIES OF BOTTLED SOUND. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

THE MYSTERIES OF BOTTLED SOUND. ONE evening last week, my friend Wiskie, late professor of Acoustics in Rock Candy University, and a man of exceedingly sound mind, telegraphed for me to come to Brooklyn at once, and bring all the Extra Dry bottles I could. I well knew the object of that visit. I was to know the deadly secret which is now being so extensively whispered in Ameiica. The professor had been granted perpetual leave of absence to attend to bottles all he desired, and, immediately snatching up what useful articles and money he could lay his hands on, he started for New York, not even waiting to say good bye to his numerous inquiring friends. A great deal of the science and skill of New York has run over to Brooklyn, and the professor feeling that the great city was rather full for him, cast anchor there too. My reception was most cordial. He hugged me to his bosom, and exclaimed, " How you've grown !' I could see that already he was full of it. After discussing two or three...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE SOPHOMORE COURSE IN LITERATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

THE SOPHOMORE COURSE IN LITERATURE. THE history of literature is prescribed by the catalogue as one of the studies of the Sophomore class —and the history of literature, as a separate branch of the history of civilization, is of infinite importance, furnishing a key to the intellectual development of our race when studied in connection with illustrative extracts from the masterpieces. Dr. Quackenbos has selected, to read to the Sophomore class, during the few weeks that remain, a rare chapter in the Book of Literature —the History of Oriental Literature —a chapter full of interest in this age, when the religions of the past are studied with eagerness ; when science, falsely so-called, has arrayed itself against the Bible; when ethnology and comparative philology are giving the lie to its conclusions, and verifying the sacred narrative. The chapter selected is, moreover, as inaccessible to the general reader as it is instructing. Few students have time to study it in many volumes ; y...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ATHLETICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

ATHLETICS. IT is now pretty well settled that the blue and white will be represented at Henley and Paris this summer. Passages have been engaged for the crew on the City of Chester, of the Inman Line, which sails May 22d, and it is expected that the Glee Club concerts will raise the remainder of the requisite money. Of late their work has been changed from afternoon to morning, so as to avail themselves of the services of Mr. R. Cornell as coach. Services which they sadly needed, as it is impossible for bow to correct the faults of the crew. The boat they will probably race in is now being built by Fearon, of Yonkers. American oars, made by Donoghue, will be taken over, though English ones will be tried when they get there. The weights of the crew, in rowing suits, at present are, though they will train down some : E. E. Sage, bow, 172 lbs. C. Edson, No. 2, 170 lbs. H. G. Ridabock, No. 3, 183 lbs. J. T. Goodwin, stroke. 165 lbs. C. Eldredge, substitute, 153 lbs. The programme for th...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
NOTES ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

NOTES ABOUT COLLEGE. MR. J. M. KNAPP, '7B. is staying at Aiken, S. C., for his health. According to private letters received from him, it is " the dullest place in the world," and he naturally longs for the pleasures of the College. We hope soon to see him restored to health and among the graduating members of his class. Philolexia. THE prize contest in Oratory was held on the evening of the 18th of April. Prof. Van Amringe and Messrs. Goodwin and G. C. Kobbe acted as judges. The following are the speakers in order, with the subjects of their pieces : Mr. E. M. Bliven —The Founding of the American Republic. Mr. J. D. Livingston — Mr. H. Cushman — Mr. J. F. Crowell —Barbarity of National Hatreds. Mr. D. M. Hildreth—The Murderer's Secret. Daniel Webster. Mr. W. B. Parsons, Jr— Robert Emmet's Vindication from Calumny. Mr. H. G. Paine—The Evil of Removing the Obelisks. Mr. H. E. Gregory—Extract from a Speech by Pres. Felton, of Harvard College. The first prize of $2O was awarded to Mr. ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

IN "THE MINES." JWYMAN URUMMOND has been elected a • member of the New York Rifle Club. THE graduating class have chosen Alman for their class photographer. Mr. Laudy is to take the group, we believe. S. H. RUSSELL, '75, has taken a desk in the Quantitative Laboratory. C. M. ROLKER, '75, has recently been in town, and passed through the School. J. C. F. RANDOLPH, '69, has returned from his prospecting tour through the South. DR. P. T. AUSTIN, '73, is prepared to give counsel and make investigations in all branches of technical chemistry. We are glad to hear of the success of Dr. Austin's lectures at Rutger's College. AT the competition for the Appleton's Prize of a set of the American Cyclopaedia, held at Creedmoor April 17th, the second best score was by D. Banks, 'BO, the conditions being 7 shots at 200 and 300 yards each. Score. —D. Banks, 32 at 200 yards. 27 at 300 " 59 total. C. E. Blydenburgh, '7B, 30 at 200. 28 at 300. Total, 58. DOUGLAS A. JOY, '75, has, in addition to his d...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. IS it not about time for college papers to enlarge upon the typographical excellence and thickness of the paper of their exchanges ? Of all " exchange notes " these seem to the average reader the silliest and most uninteresting. We are aware that some of our esteemed contemporaries would object to this, having nothing but superior " get-up " to be proud of, nevertheless the Exchange Department should be written with a regard for the wishes of the reader quite as much as for those of other editors. The time seems not far distant when the puerile literary articles which now disfigure so many college periodicals will be forever banished to the wastebasket. Ne sutor, eto / College papers can aspire to no real literary excellence, and by a rigid adherence to a limited sphere their general interest would be increased a hundredfold. THOMAS A. EDISON, the inventor of the Phonograph, is to contribute to the May-June number of the North American Review an article entitled " The...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst: — Eleven Juniors elect Zoology this term. Only about half-a-dozen juniors elect Juvenal for this term. The Sophomores are reading Juvenal's satires instead of Ovid which the last class used. Prof. Root is lecturing to the Juniors on Light instead of Heat, as was announced last term. The Freshmen have received a challenge from the Brown Freshmen to play a match game of ball. It has not yet been accepted. A room for the accommodation of the ball nine was built during vacation, under the grand stand on Blake Field. The University Nine played a practice game of ball with the Freshmen nine April 18. The Freshmen played remarkably well, but were beaten by a score of 18 to o. Pres. Seelye has during vacation obtained from the friends of the college about $5OOO towards the sum which is being raised for the purchase of Prof. Shepard's Mineralogical cabinet. The nine this year will consist of Couch, 7S, short stop and captain; Pratt, '7B, h.; Andrews, '79, p.; Plim...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

THE LIBRARY. WE have rarely met with a more useful and practical work than Mr. W. Davenport Adams' Dictionary of English Literature (Cassell: $4.00). In the convenient space of 708 double column quarto pages we have here a comprehensive guide to the whole field of English literature. The names of all writers of note, their most important works, and the most popular quotations and heroes from each are all given under separate heads, so that reference is greatly facilitated. No effort has wisely been made to make the book a biographical index of authors, but room has been found under the name of each writer for a series of representative criticisms. The variety of topics treated of, and the great number of tempting titles on each page, must be seen to be appreciated. Indeed, no more delightful volume for a lover of reading to pick up and finger through has been published of late, and hours may be very profitably spent in this way. A pretty close examination and cross reference, especi...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 May 1878

SHAVINGS. AN academic called on a young lady one evening,, about eight o'clock, but she had retired ; she, however, soon appeared, and excused her delay by saying, " When you came I was fast asleep and saying my prayers. — Ex. (PROFESSOR eloquently holding forth to the Junior Rhetoric class. One of its members, on the back seat, likewise eloquently holding forth to her neighbor.) Professor. —" I beg pardon, Miss A., I believe I interrupted you." Miss A. —"Oh, no, not at all; I had finished." Senior meets dear friend who never went to college, and the following dialogue ensues : Dear Friend. —" What do you study now ?" Senior. —" History, German and Psychology." D. F. —" Psychology? I think I should like that." S. —" It is certainly useful as a counteractive and conservative influence against the one-sided and destructive materialistic tendencies of our time." D. F. —" Yes, I've seen it advertized. It's this soulcharming, or how to win the affections of any one in two weeks, isn't it...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, MAY 15th, 1878. No. 16. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLLS, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, CHARLES H. CROW, '7B, Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B- J- FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. H. G. PAINE, '79- W - B - PARSONS, JR. '79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - *5 cts - Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. THE Second Term comes to a successful close on the 17th inst., while the Seniors have already ceased attending lectures for a week. Thanks to the abolition of Cram week the vacation will practically begin on the 27th, and the students will have more than four months of vacation. The term, like the year, passed by without any special events of note, except that it saw the curious spectacle of the Board of Trustees really coming to a definite conclusion on several important questions such as the new building and reforms in the statutes. On the other hand, the course of study remains in its old imperfect condition, without the most important subject of History, and laying particular stress on the most valueless and pedantic studies of Greek and Antiquities. While this melancholy fact is, however, true, and probably will remain so for another year, we can already discern the signs of coming improvement. With more room, more students and more tutors and professors, reform...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ANTI-FUNNY-MAN'S ASSOCIATION. First Annual Meeting. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1878

ANTI-FUNNY-MAN'S ASSOCIATION. First Annual Meeting. THE first annual meeting of this highly respectable society took place under the most favorable auspices. Delegates were present from every State in the Union, and several colleges were represented. A letter was read from Sitting Bull, who is chairman of the standing committee for the Western States, regretting that he could not be present, but stating the good work that is going on out on the Plains, and full particulars of the murder of three (3) funny men en route for Western papers. A man who it was feared was about to become a funny paragraphist was also slain by the Bull. After a short debate, this action on the part of him and his band was unanimously sustained, and a vote of thanks rendered. President Smith of Buckingham College, Nebraska, was then called to the chair, and a lively debate followed as to what the society should have at their coming dinner. It was voted not to have any toasts, lest there should be a tendency ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ATHLETICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1878

ATHLETICS. THE Twelfth Field Meeting of our Athletic Association took place at Mott Haven on Saturday, May 4th, under the able direction of the following officers : L. M. Cheesman, President; R. C. Cornell/74, Referee ; Prof. Van Amringe and J. T. Goodwin, '76, judges. The Grand Stand was even more than ever filled with ladies, while the weather and the condition of the track were all that could be desired. The mile walk brought the following competitors to the line: W. Beams, '7B ;F. Klepetko, S. of M., and W. B. Parsons, Jr., '79. Klepetko taking the lead at the start drew away ten yards from Parsons in the first lap, but by steady plodding the latter closed the gap shortly after passing the half-mile pole, and taking the lead at the conclusion of the fourth lap, Klepetko dropped out. Parsons spurting during the remaining lap, beat Beams by about 50 yards. Time 8.43 X. Running High Jump. —J. P. Conover, '80; H. L. Bogert, '7B ; J. W. Pryor,'7B ; and F. D. Browning, S. of M. Mr. Co...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE REGATTA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1878

THE REGATTA. THE eleventh of May, regatta clay, was not quite the sort of weather liked by oarsmen. Instead of a nice balmy day, such as might be expected at this season, it was cold and tempestuous. A perfect gale blew right across the course, threatening a swamp for any fool-hardy sculler, while the waves dashed and broke on the float. Still allowing a great deal to the inclemency of the weather, the regatta, as a success, cannot be compared with last spring's. The class crews were the only ones that had trained at all, while none of 'Bo's oarsmen who won last year were found in the boat this, so that they had to be represented by a crew far poorer than they need have been. Then there appeared to be a lack of management. No one seemed to know what there was to be, and everybody asked "What next?" Now all this arises from too causes : First, laziness on the part of the students. There is many a good oarsman lying about, but he will not work because there is no show to get in the Un...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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