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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

"-lij- i ilirn M72 INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 church, still at Milan, to the altar, chanting that Tc Deum, which has been, ever since that year, 387, the Church's song of triumphant gratitude and praise. And now Monica, and her two sons, Atigustin and Navigius, are on their way to Africa, to sail from Ostia. But while they pause there a wonderful ex altation takes possession of the mother's soul. It is here that Augustin says: "She and I were standing alone, lean ing upon a window, that looked into the garden of tho house where we were, in that town of Ostia upon Tiber; where, retired from company and noise after tho fatigue of a long journey, we were repairing our spirits for our voyage by sea; and there, we two alone discoursed together very sweetly, enquiring be- tweon ourselves in the presence of Truth, which is Thyself, what the eter nal life of the saints shall be." Five days after this transporting conversation, Monica fell ill. Swoon ing one day, on coming to herself she said: "Her...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

rTHWW"r &2 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. his own words to the emperor Constan tino; being no less than the appearance at nine o'clock of the morning, on the 7th of May, of a luminous cross in the heavens over Mount Golgatha, and reaching as far as Mount Olivet; and which continued for several hours, being seen by all the inhabitants of Jerusalem, "Citizens and strangers, Christians and heathens, with one voice giving praise to our Lord Jesus Christ." It was this Cyril, to whose sanctity so many won ders gave witness, who wrote: "We also pray for the deceased holy fathers, bishops and all in general who are dead, believing that this will be a great succor to those souls for which prayer is offeied, while the holy and most tremendous victim lies present." Another saint from this age, as we may say, of Christian Doctors, grand teachers, coming down to our own day with all the weight of authority as in their own, was Ephrem of Edessa. His parents lived in the country, earned their bread by t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

FIRH "' ' ""W'TWt tt-"" " THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. $8 In the year 1207, Queen Gertrude, wife of Andrew II., King of Hungary, gave birth to a daughter who received at the font the name of Elizabeth. At this very time, Saint Francis of Assisi was drawing the hearts of kings and nobles to his rule of charity and of holy Poverty; and the soul of Francis seemed to have enshrined itself in the tender hut heroic heart of Elizabeth of Hun gary, Duchess of Thuringia. After the death of her young husband, on his way to the holy wars in Palestine, this Elizabeth, still in the spring-time of life, gives herself wholly to works of mercy. Her story is one which inspired a Montalembert to write what is a poem without metre or rhyme; and which itself inspired an Overbeck to make a drawing of Saint Elizabeth with her young husband, Duke Louis holding open her mantle to see only roses, while her right hand dispenses bread to a cripple. This Elizabeth, more than five hundred years before Count de Montalem...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1895

Sit. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. heart-break, until a sun-burst of grace changed Catharine from a heartbroken wife, seeking in vain for comfort from the world or even from the ordinary practice of devotion, to a saint, who was to crown her native city with an aureole of glory and to be called, not Catherine of Fieschi, or Catherine Adorno, but Snint Catherine of Genoa. The life of Catherine from the time of her conversion was a life of ecstatic union with God and of unmeasured charity to her fellow creatures. Her husband's conversion and final perse verance was her visible reward in this life for her self-abnegations. Her wonderful example drew the noblest ladies of Genoa to serve in the hospitals, for the Hospital of Pammatone, of which she was the patron, was served alto gether by laics as air act of devotion. Yet under the burden of all these self imposed duties, she wrote treatises fre quentty referred to by Cardinal Bellar mine in his writings; by Cardinal Frederic Borromeo, nephew of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VII. APRIL, 1895. No. 2. Panegyric of St. Benedict. Y IMtOVOST I) SAVINIAN, ). S. II. "The man of God, Benedict, was filled with the spirit of all the Just." Dtaloyne of St. Gregory the Great. My friends, what is a saint? A saint is a person who does Clod's will. Now God made us to know Him, to servo Him; to do this is to be a saint. One who does know God by Faith, loves Him for his infinite perfections, and serves Him by keeping His Commandments, is a saint on earth, and if heperseveres to the end of his life, will, one day, be a saint in heaven. All the Blessed of God have done that, and in the unity of their aim, and the identity of their attainment is illus trated the beautiful unity of the King dom of God; one God, one King, one Kingdom of Glory in heaven; on earth one Lord Jesus, one Shepherd, one fold. But in this very unity there is a diver sity which renders it still more beauti ful. As there are no two s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

26 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. when he was given to see an image of the whole world in a ray of the Divine Majesty. Like unto the greatest of the prophets of old, he seems having seen God face to face, what wonder then that like the great law-giver of God's chosen people, Benedict should have been directly inspired to write his holy rule, so full of superhuman wisdom, so permeated with the sweetness of the spirit of the Gospel, so apt to make saints! Benedict showed himself in possession of the apostolic spirit in preaching to those shepherds who discovered him at Subiaco, in speaking with such apos tolic freedom to those Barbarians in vading Italy, and in converting the rustic heathens of Monte Cassino. On coming thither he had found the devils in possession of the high places, with a temple and consecrated groves. Benedict enlightens the poor deluded people, sets fire to the groves, overturns the idols, and builds two chapels, one under the invocation of St. John the Baptist, the other u...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

wmmmum mmmmmmmmmmm Vf THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 27 blend so well together her veneration for her saintly brother and her love of heaven, and whose prayers, at least on one occasion, proved more powerful than his own. We have now considered our holy Father Benedict as filled with the spirit of the patriarchs, the prophet's, the apostles, the martyrs, and the virgins, but it is as a confessor that he appeals the more to our attention and gives us examples that all of us can follow. We are not all called to be apostles or martyrs, but we must all be confessors. The glory of the confessor seems less sublime, and yet it may be more so, in the weight of accumulated merits during a life-time, for it consists in the practice of all christian virtues under the ordi nary circumstances of our daily life. During sixty-three years did Benedict strive after perfection, never growing lax in the service of his divine Master. From the dawn of a pious 3'outh, going from virtue to virtue, he discovers new ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

0ts-m '"'fx-vy" ntrp 28 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. MfVWfW VQfPW&F miiA the greatness, and study the virtues of the august Virgin Mary, Mother of God and our own Mothqr. It was at Rome that the devotion of the month of Mary took birth, yet the author of so lioljf a practice is unknown. All that is known is that it was a holy priest that undertook the establishing of this sublime and consoling devotion. And if you wish to understand why he selected the month of May in preference to any other month, you may receive the explanation from the consecrated lips of another holy priest. "When one makes an offering," says Father Lalomia; "he should choose what is best and most pleasing. This is why the most beautiful month of the year has been selected, which, by the reno vation of nature and the agreeable variety of flowers wherewith the earth is covered, seems to invite the soul to recognize grace, to clothe itself with most beautiful acts of virtue, to make of them, as it were, a crown for th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. SO system of education, which will make him only a more intelligent and sharper rogue than ho was before. The fact is the poor Indian is doomed and the responsibility rests upon the cruel, drastic Protestant civilization, which has pursued him from the start, and which threatens to exterminate him from the face of the earth. The whole course of the treatment of these wards of the nation does but confirm the candid, outspoken testimony of Senator Dawes, of Massachusetts, who, in a remarkable speech in "Worchester, in 1885, made the following declara tion. The passage will bear frequent repetition : "Our forefathers cume here under the impression that every Christian nation was entitled to the possession of all barbarians that it could seize. They found the barbarians here so strong that they had to treat with them, and go through the form of purchase. They obtained permission to stay here and from that day to this we have never met the Indian in good faith, fairl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

?r rr 'tf7WS"PP w-. 30 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. HW5WWW"W"T ing, selfish, worldly class of our people are opposed to the Christian civilization of the Indians, but that all denomina tions of Protestants have united in abandoning the Christian civilization of the Indians themselves for the sake of preventing Catholics from imparting to them that great and inestimable blessing. Well, their's be the fearful responsibility if they are willing to bear it. They will, no doubt, have the op portunitj7 of rejoicing over the crippling perhaps the destruction, of some of the Catholic missions. We do not envy them their joy. Nor can we envy them their feeling in view of the confirmation which their conduct furnishes of the truth of the declamation of Senator Dawes in regard to the real nature of Protestant civilization, as illustrated in the shameful, disgraceful, mortifying history of the aborigines of our glorious COUntry .rlc catholic Review. FRUITS OF UNBELIEF. Our illustration on the next page ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

Tjp-iw 'my."-' "i'' iyW-r--rr-pT TilE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 FRUITS OF UNBELIEF.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

,, -w ,,m.VM.myi r-$- mmim"wmim fmminj 8J THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. v J My Neighbor and I. My neighbor's acres held in fee Lie brond, and green, and fair; Six slender feet of ground for me, My mother earth may spare, To have and hold when I shall be Heedless of title there. The turiets of his mansion rise In state above the trees; The walls that greet my waking eyes, His pride would hardly please, Unless some bide me in the skies, I have none else than these. The dainties of his broken fast He took with grace unsaid ; I marvel if the plain repast, Which my fresh hunger fed Upon his pride the charm could cast Of thanks for "daily bread." A thousand greet him on the street, Proud of his smile, or hand; He would not see me, should we meet, Tlfe lowly and the grand; But there's content beneath my feet He would not understand. While to my neighbor and to me Time moves with even speed. He's rich, as one may need to be, And I am poor indeed; So poor, that I his splendor see, Lacking both gold a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

mmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. S3 denominations who would undertake the work on tho same terms." This last clause, boing in the nature of an invitation to all religious denom inations to apply for educational facili ties at the agencies, was accepted by many of the churches, the Catholic body among the rest. And the fact that their church had always been more or less extensively engaged than any other in Indian missionary work, prompted the Catholics to bid for thirty-eight agencies, whereat, they claimed, they were the first denomin ation to establish missions. Notwith standing the apparent fairness of the President's words, however, the Catho lics managed to get but eight agenceis out of the entire sixty-four; and as long as their share was kept down to such small proportions as that, none of the other religious denominations uttered a word in protest of the Government's Indian policy. The lion's share of the Government appropriations went to them; and as longas that state of thing...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

r-,ft-ifjpi JH 9lll''Mj7" ' sj, THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ings with the officials of the Catholic Indian bureau. It culminated, so to speak, later still, when all the Protes tant denominations, avowing their in ability to compete with the Catholic Church, announced that thereafter they would accept no assistance from the Government. The evident aim of this move was to force the Catholic Church to follow the lead of its discomfited rivals; but the aim was not attained, for the Catholic authorities felt no obli gation of imitating the other denomina tions, and thought themselves fully warranted in accepting the appropria tions as long as they did the work which the Government paid them for accom plishing. The agitation against the Catholic Indian schools, and the refusal of the Protestant denominations to take Gov ernment aid in future, prompted though it was bjr an unworthy and thoroughly selfish motive, bid fair, as already stated, to lead to a radical change in the future Indian policy ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 85 under its oporntions tho Catholic Church is entitled to a larger amount of Gov ernment aid than any Protestant de nomination. The religious issue has been unjustly and unwarrantably raised in this matter, and the indications now are that before many years the Government will have its own schools at all the agencies, for which institu tions, even though the Tndian children prefer to attend other schools, as the Catholic children will, all the appro priations will be allotted. Sowing His Wild Oats. "Sowing his wild oats." What shall he reap? Sorrow and tears, Sorrow and tears. The mother who bore him sadly shall weep. Oh! bitter returns for the wearisome years Of watching and tending, With care never ending. Now, when the rich grain should be ripe in the sheaf, Shall the reaping time bring her a harvest of grief. "Sowing his wild oats." What shall he reap? Sorrow and shame. Sorrow and shame. No shaft wounds the heart of the father so deep, As the poison-barbed ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

" lWTOfy''1"BtF'5"aF " V WVJIWW 55 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TU4C Idiar tdVocatc Is a Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the lost remnants of the Indian tribes, nud to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found iu any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory Approved by Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar Apostoi ic of Oklahoma and Indian Territory. Stibscriptions CO Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. APRIL, 1895. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. After the union oi" all the Benedictine monasteries under an abbot-primate, which was ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 37 od by State funds. The bigotry which sought to abolish every trace of Catholic teaching among the Indians will recoil on itself. We would rather see United States army officers in charge of Jndian schools than Sunday School marms and preachers. Hand over all the Indian schools to Uncle Sam. The Vicariate of the Indian Terri tory, according to Hoffman's Directory has 3G churches, 95 stations and chapels attended by 23 priests. The Catholic population is 12,385. Bad temper is its own scourge. Few things are more bitter than to feel bitter. A man's venom poisons him self more than his victim. Once a lawyer being called upon to defend a woman accused of murdering her husband, adduced as one of the proofs of her innocence the fact of her having attended him on his death-bed, and having said to him when he was dying: "Good by, George!" The counsel for the State declared that it ought rather bo taken as a proof of her guilt, and that the words she had used were: "Go...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

38 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. with the sea and storm of this wicked world! and lo! they set sail towards a safe harhor, which, let us hope, will bring them to their eternal home. Dante has a place in the "Inferno" for people that are too mean to even go to hell and the devil himself must de spise a man, who under the guise of friendship, charity and religion urges the powers that be, to rob the little Indians of their faith and a Community of its good name. This is the compli ment the Advocate (the Indian Advo cate at that) pays to a certain Super visor, whose name its pen refuses to trace. The editor seldom witnessed a more enthusiastic crowd to celebrate Wash ington s birthday than the pupils of Sacred Heart College. Useless to say that this memorable day was appropri ately celebrated. Sacred Heart Literary Society gave an entertainment on this occasion. Washington, our fiag, our country, were the predominant topics. "Nothing can inspire the rising gen eration with a higher and nobler p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 tho orator of the day showed to the satisfaction of ovorybody that "Tho! every shamrock has with blood been wet, Thero's life, thank God, within the old .sod yet." March 19, Feast of St. Joseph, his Lordship, the Bishop, officiated pontif ically at St. Joseph's Church, in Okla homa City. In the evening he lectured to one attentive and numerous audience. March 21, St. Benedict's day, Mgr. Meerschaert again sung pontifical High Mass at Sacred Heart Mission, and con firmed over 30 candidates. Sunday, March 24, the indefatigable Prelate was in Pureell, distributing the bread of lifo for the first time to a numerous class of Indian children, the pupils of the devoted Sisters of St. Francis and some converts. The same wore confirmed on the day above mentioned. The Senators and the Indian Schools. Is it possible that the Senate of the United States will finally commit itself to the policy of founding a State re ligion? It does not seem possible; yet when we read the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1895

yrfl"iwwwiw 4.0 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. S tostants would be at the Senate doors with arms in their hands. Alas! Cath olics are all too meek under the growing arrogance and injustice of the violent element pitted against them. While their principles oblige them to be law abiding, there is no precept, human or divtne, to hinder them using lawful means to hurl from power men who insult their dearest convictions and trample on their clearest rights. Catholics care little whether the schools they have built and equipped be helped by public money or not, but the7 will not submit to have a Protest ant or any other church established at their expense. In this the genuine spirit of American manhood is with them. Cathoh Timet. As Warriors Die. Three Brule Sioux were riding in single file toward an elevation on the prairie near the agency. They were condemned to die, and it was the hour for the execution. They had been in rebellion against the Government. When the grass was long, and the streams ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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