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Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

ABOUT INSECTS. [All inquiries oonoernlng tnieota or plant dis eases should be aooompanted by ■peolmens, if possible. In sending insects please ob serve the following directions: Adult in sects should first be killed. This win easily and quickly be done by putting the insect for a few moments in a closed vessel with a few drops of chloroform. Any method, however, which does not mutilate the specimens, will answer. Place the speci mens to bo sent in a stout tin or wooden box. packing them with cotton, so they will not be broken. Caterpillars and other lar val forms should be sent alive, care being taken to put enough of the food plant in the box to last two days. Do not punch holes in the box. The mailing rate on pack ages of insects or plants is 1 cent per ounce. Accompany the specimens with your notes and observations. Write your name plain ly on the outside of the package, and ad dress It to Prof. C. V. Pipkk, Pullman, Wash. "Never ask a question if you can help it; but by all mean...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

10 SOUTHERN WOMEN FARMERS. Mrs. Field, of New Orleans, in a re cent lecture, says the New York Sun, spoke of Louisiana as waiting to be cut up into small holdings by young Corydons and Phyllises, who will grow cotton for the central factories, have market gardens, orchards, dairy farms and poultry yards, and who will also grow flowers and make honey. She had seen a kitchen garden whose products equaled any shown at the Chicago fair, and yet they were raised by two young girls. Near by, in the same parish of Cameron, a young Irish girl squatter, with her 16 --year-old brother, took up a government claim of 160 acres and went to plant ing rice, the first crop of which paid her $1,200. She lives in a three-room cottage and has a few fruit trees, plenty of fences and a sea of waving rice blades. Her nearest neighbor is another girl farmer, who also settled a government claim and is bossing an orchard that is already giving her a comfortable living. A woman who is dressmaking in Chicago,...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

POULTRY RANCH. [Our Poultry Editor is Harry H. Collier, No. 850 C street, Tacoma. Addresu him on all Poultry matters.] TROUBLES OF YOUNG CHICKS. This is the season during which ev ery well-regulated farm yard is filled with little chicks, and for the benefit of the beginner it is well to say some thing about the diseases that are lia able to creep into the flock. Diarrhasa is one of the worst dis eases that attack small chicks. There may be a variety of causes for it, some of which are: Giving- food in a sloppy condition; not keeping- fresh water be fore them, and failing1 to keep the drinking- fountain clean. When you see one standing around, refusing to eat, wings drooping and eyes closed, you know it is sick, and nine times out of ten it has diarrhoea. The best treatment we know is the following: Mix % grain of saffron, % ounce gen tian, red pepper, 10 grains. Mix a level teaspoonful of this in the soft food every morning for a flock of ten chicks. Boil raspberry leaves and give ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

12 WHY? Hattie Horner-Louthun in Union Signal. He couldn't write, he couldn't read. He little knew nor caivd About the people's wrongs and need; How others lived he took no heed. Nor how they fared. The big saloon he couldn't pass, Nor pools of any type. He couldn't live without his glass. And he ftl miserable, alas! Without his pipe. On public stream*, whichever the way. He could <lo naught but float; And on the questions of the day He couldn't think, he couldn't pray- But he could vote. She couldn't drink, she couldn't swear. She couldn't even smoke; Nor could she open wrongs declare. Nor with n ballot did she dare The right invoke. She loved the people, and she knew The questions passing by Were weighty; her conclusions drew— And out of these convictions grew. The how and why. She kepi herself outside tlio rut; From leading minds could quote; she had opinions clearly cut; Could write and road and reason—but She could not vole. SAVING THE TREASURE. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

campfire by the driver, and it was not until they had finished and the pay master had lig-hted his cigar that the woman quietly beg-an: "I have something- of particular im portance to communicate to you, ma jor. We are out of earshot of the men, but yet under their eyes. Any movement on your part which betrays excitement will result disastrously. We will look about while we talk, and they will think we are conversing about the scenery." "What is it?" queried the major, his thoughts at once leaping to the story of the outlaws. "You have twelve men here," she calmly continued. "The sergeant, the driver and seven of the men speak Spanish; you do not. I have caug-ht scraps of conversation during- the day and know what is to happen to-nig-ht. Your face is flushed already. You must control yourself, or we are lost. The serg-eant and seven of his com rades have been corrupted. The driver is in with them. Somewhere up here is a gang- of reneg-ades. The two par ties are to- make one, secure ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

*4 SAVING THE TREASURE. [Continued from Page 13.] the pass now came up and there was a move by the whole body of men to seize the wagon and draw it out. Not one of them had even looked into the tent where the corpse of the paymaster was supposed to be lj'ing. "We must kill as many of them as we can," whispered the widow, as the men approached. "The revolvers are between us and the spare cartridges to your right. Here they come!" There were twenty-one men in the gang. They believed the paymaster dead and the woman helpless. Crack! crack! crack! went the Winchesters from under the ambulance, and so great was the surprise of the gang that five men lay dead and three oth ers were wounded before those who could g-et away rushed up the pass out of rang-e. For half an hour nothing was heard from them. Then they came with a rush and a yell. They had to expose themselves, but they also knew where to point their weap ons. Scarcely a word had passed be tween the major and the widow. She had la...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

ELECTRIC LIGHTS. Mutability of temper and inconsist ency with ourselves is the great weak ness of human nature. —Addison. Those who reason only by analogies rarely reason by logic and are gener ally slaves to imagination. —C. Sim mons. Slander is a vice that strikes a double blow, wounding both him that commits and him against whom it is committed. —Saurin. Make people happy and there will not be half the quarreling or a tenth part of the wickedness there is.—Mrs. L. M. Child. Sunday is the core of our civiliza tion, dedicated to thought and rever ence. It invites to the noblest solitude and the noblest society. —Emerson. It is by imitation far more than by precept that we learn everything, and what we learn thus we acquire not only more effectually, but more pleas antly. —Burke. Others will judge you not by what you can be, but by what you are; but you must judge yourself not by what you are, but by what you can be. — Ivan Panin. To do an evil action is base; to do a good action wi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 19 May 1894

16 Irrigation is King and We are the People! Our great $75,000 cash pumping plant is in operation, irrigating 3,000 acres of the finest land under the sun. Prosser is the commercial town of the lower Yakima valley. 50,000 sheep are sheared here. The great Horse Heaven wheat and stock country of 400,000 acres is at our backs. The wonderful Sunnyside region is before us. The Northern Pacific railroad runs through our midst. A Now we are going to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will *Now of itself. We to develop the farm lands, knowing that the town will fr take care of itself. We are going to show our opportunities honestly and truth- fully, and we are going to help the people who come here. No fairy tales will be told. We are here to win, and those who come and stay with us will win, too. We will meet you half way on any fair proposition. Come and see us and our splendid country and opportunities will grow on you, and you will throw off your coat and go to workwith us. ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. 1. NO. 20. PROSPECTS. California wool growers who are pestering congress with prayers for the protection of wool, should have an interview with Alfred Rasch, of Klick itat county, Washington. He has just shipped to San Francisco more than 50,000 pounds of wool, and says that if he gets for it 11 cents a pound, as he expects to do, he will clear 30 per cent upon the capital invested in the enterprise. And he further says there is money in the business at 8 cents per pound. Isn't there something- su premely ridiculous in the idea of men who pasture their flocks upon the pub lic domain, beseeching" congress to add to this pasturage donation a tariff protection which results in a direct and heavy tax upon the rest of their fellow citizens who purchase woolen fabrics for clothing and other domestic purposes? * * * Carl Mensing- calls attention to the public employment companies of Eu rope as poi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

2 quality of the vast herds of wool bearers on the Washing-ton and Ore gon hills. The mutton and long wool breeds would be in quick demand for breeding- up purposes, if they could be purchased from near-by breeding flocks, instead of paying the almost prohibitory express charges required to safely ship valuable animals from far-away eastern farms. And similar arguments apply to poultry. These inland farmers actually do not raise above a small fraction of the eggs and poultry consumed in the county market towns; while the mild winters and bountiful feed conditions are well nigh perfect for poultry breeding. The state fair will prove an object lesson in this direction. There will be seen fine specimens of the improved breeds of live stock, but the limited number of breeders in each class will show that there is abundant room for others in the business. Washing-ton farmers will not have justice done them until they can have the supplying of the Washington state institutions with Washin...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

All crops have made wonderful pro gress; warm sunshine has beuefitted fruit. The Skagit, Pra»ier and Colum bia river freshets have damaged thing! a good deal —especially in Clarke and Snohomish counties. THE HOP SITUATION. Better weather for forwarding the growth of the vine never fell to the lot of any country —warm, bright and without wind, and but moderately cool at night. In the older and better cared-for yards the vines are arming out in good shape at least ten days earlier than last year. Mr. Fleming reports growth so dense as to interfere somewhat with cultivation. Most of the yards are twined and the vines are taking a rapid horizontal run. The new yards down in the Sunnyslde re gion are reported in first-class condi tion. Quotations at San Francisco are unchanged, ranging from 15 to 16c. At Portland and Seattle no transac tions are recorded. A late London circular says: "There is little inquiry for coast hops just at present. The scarcity of English, and possible com ing pi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

4 MORE ABOUT FLAX CULTURE. Methods in Use in Scotland. A well-known Scottish authority writes as follows concerning the meth ods of flax culture in that country, to F. G. Parker, of Walla Walla. For further particulars, see articles by Dr. J. G. Van Marter and Mr. Parker in Thk Ranch of last week: In days gone by every farmer in Scotland grew a little flax. When wheat rose to 70s a qitarter and our farmers stopped growing flax, most of it was imported from Russia. The very great prosperity of the jute trade here also led the flax spinners to de velop that industry. But now when, owing to the very low price of siver, a rupee is purchased for Is 5d instead of 2s or 2s Id, India gives us wheat at rates which have forced down the price to 28 to 30s a quarter for wheat. It may be interesting to your farmers to show exactly how this operates. Now if 17 pence gold coin can buy a rupee, while before it took 24s to buy as much silver, and if this silver ru pee still buj's as much wheat as ev...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

dafe say the bolls are hot worth as much to you as to us, for beef here is SO to 55s for 112 pounds. We import ,£7,000,000 worth of seed for feeding. This shows the value British farmers put on oil cake, for the seeds are most Used in this form. I ought to add that the water in which the flax is steeped is liquid manure and is of great value, and should, if possible, be made to run over waste land and so enrich it. Connected with prison life, I see the greatest possible advantage in putting the prisoners to work the flax after it is rippled. They would work at it in the open air. It is a healthful occu pation, and would suit them exactly. Besides, in the scutching they might be made to turn a wheel to drive the scutcher. Hopeful work, with joy and human intercourse, is the remedy for the moral disease of the criminal, es pecially work which will fit him for honest labor afterward. The flax industry will grow with the growth of civilization. Every good housewife likes a kist of linen...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

6 EASTERN FRUIT PROSPECTS. The Ranch is indebted to Barnett Bros., Chicago, for a report of weather and prospects up to May 21: The exceedingly hot weather of the 14th-16th, the hottest in May for 20 years, was followed b}f the worst storms known in the same month for years. Wind from the north brought a very low temperature, which covered all the country east of the Missouri river, with considerable damage west of it. The high wind whipped the leaves and young fruit that had just set, and caused more damage than the frost, for over a large area the cloudy weather prevented much damage from that cause, although with clearing weather some more loss may be occa sioned. The forcing" weather of Last week advanced the fruit to a point that would enable it to stand considerable cold weather, possibly excepting north ern Michigan, Canada and New Eng land. Of course tender vegetables are cut off. That it will retard the north ern crops and lengthen the season for the section south of us is ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

THE YORKSHIRE HOG. The large Yorkshire is classed as the best bacon hog in England. It is a rangy, deep-bodied hog, pure white, head rather large, ears lopped, rather long in the leg, the back narrow and arched, with a drooping rump. They grow to a good size, are slow to fatten, and always have a good deal of lean meat, or muscle, mixed with the fat. It is this characteristic which makes them prized so highly by bacon curers, as their flat sides always have the streak of fat and the streak of lean which makes the proper combination for the great breakfast dish, bacon and eggs. Their hams and shoulders are prized for this same characteristic. The small Yorkshire is a very different animal, except in color. He is a smooth, broad-backed, fine-boned hog, his head finer, much dished, and the nose short and turned up. His make up shows him to be early maturing and easily fattened, and very similar in form to what is known in this country as Suffolk. They are not so prolific as the large h...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

8 THE RANCH. A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It Phice —$1.00 it year in advance. Worth —Two gold dollars. Monthly Edition. 50c. a yean Conducted by E. H. 1-iniiv. Managing Editor, W. W.COBBBTT. Published by the YAKIMA PUBWHINJ COMPANY. KDITOKIAL OF KICKS! NOIITH YAKIMA. WASHINGTON. BUSINESS OFFICES! North Yakiina. Yukima:Avenue. .Seattle, Room 7, H luck ley Block. Taconw, 1118 Puciilc Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. A box of good winter apples pays for The Ranch for a year. Two sacks of potatoes or less pay for The Ranch for a year. Send us your name and $1, and re ceive Thr Ranch for a year. Stretch the noon hour reasonably these hot periods. Some things are good alike for man and beast, and rest is one of them. Have you got that hop vine started on its way over the porch? If not, put in the root now. You will enjoy its shade and its beauty in the coming midsummer. And behold the weeds of the field. They toil not, but O, how they "spin" these warm bright days. But the cul tiva...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

SdMirniNf, ABOUT POTATOES. There are 300 acres of potatoes un der the artesian well in the Moxee, and every one who has seen them con cedes that a yield of 300 bushels of the succulent "murphy" per acre is not too much to expect. Messrs. Ross and Mills were figuring on the possibili ties opened up with this enormous yield in view. The figures were some what startling, and the reporter made some investigations on the subject. He found that in hauling potatoes from the Moxee, an ordinary team will make two trips a day. A wagon of the ordinary farm variety will not hold an average of over forty-five bushels. Thus, making two trips a day, one man with a team will bring 90 bushels per day into town. It will, therefore, take him 3J4 days to haul the proceeds of an acre, and it will take one man three years, working half of the Sundays, to bri-ng in the product of those 300 acres. The total product of the 300 acres will, of course, be 90,000 bushels. Commission men say that usually 330 bus...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

10 THE INTERVIEWER. lit the Outside World—Talks With Seat tle Produce Dealers awd an Editor— Fogarty, Fry and Wood—Hints to Grow ers and Shippcrs^-PickiuK, Packing, ISi.unliim ■ A Batch of Wholesome Ad vice Given for the Asking. Interviews with several prominent commission men in Seattle indicate verj' surely that Yakima products will be counted upon a gtxxl deal more than in former years for consumption by the people of that city. Heretofore just sufficient of our potatoes, sweet potatoes, melons and fruits have been handled there to #ivc citizens a true idea of their worth as compared with the same articles from the lower coast and from Oregon. One of the first to fully realize this condition of affairs was J. B. Fogarty, the enterprising farmer, dairyman and grocer of EUensburg-h. To ex pand the trade in farm products for the benefit of his own particular lo cality, Mr. Fogaxty has established a commission house on West street for the sale of Kittitas and Yakima pro duce, and has...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

urge the importance of canneries to Use up the lower grades* I do not mean the damaged fruit, but the smaller and less perfect specimens. Keep all of the low grades possible out of the market here or at the east. Save in freight and get better prices, would be my motto. Your shipping associations should have agents in all the cities of the Sound, clear up to Victoria, in advance of shipments, to look up customers. This will give commission men a chance to see the retail men and arrange for sales. They in turn will talk with consumers, who will know what to expect, and when. POULTRY RANCH. [Our Poultry Kditor U Hurry H. Collier, No. 950 0 itneU ntoma. Address him OB all Pouliry matters.] ECONOMY IN NUMBERS. Herbert B. Reed In Colorado Poultry Journal. Few if any articles are seen in poul try literature relative to the most im portant of all poultry subjects, as up on the correct solution of the problem either by accident or design on the part of the poultry grower, depends the succes...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 2 June 1894

12 A DREAM POEM. Last night as I lay sleeping I dreamed 1 wrote a rhyme That critics called the finest Little poem of the time. And when 1 waked this morning. As the day dawned clear and bright. The verses seemed to be so obscure— Those critic's may be right —Harper's Magazine. THE LILAC. The lilac stood dose to Elizabeths window. All purple with bloom, while the little muid spun. Her stint was a long one. and she was a weary And moaned that Jshe never could Ret it done. But a wind stirred the lilac blossoms, And a wonderful sweetness came floating in. And Elizabeth felt, though she could not have said it. That a friend had come to her to help her spin. And after that she kept on her spinning. Gay as a bird, for the world hail begun To seem such a pleasant, good place for working. That she was amazed when her stint was done. And the pale-browed little New England maiden Outside her lessons bad learned that duy, That the sweetness around us will sweeten labor If we will but let it ha...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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