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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 July 1918

POLITICAL POINTERS In political circles things have begun to stir and the of'h'ce seekers are on the streets wearing their best smiles. Rumor has it that Elmer Conner will again cross swords with "Mistah" Wadall and Cayton's Weekly hopes thlt Rimer will wipe the earth up with him. its enough to give one the royal jim jama to think of having to make a choice between Hull and Hugo Kelly for county assessor iin;' that seems to be the ticket. In aiioiincinii' Ins candidacy Per count} commisioner L«%"<. Hamilton relies on the record he made while in the office and since the grand jury i'uiled on two different oc casions to indict him for malfeasance in of- Jicc, his record must be all wool and a yard •. -;ue. Commissioner Lou Smith has an eight \(.m record as county commissioner and a four-year record as sheriff, all in King county to refer to and he says, "If my record is not clear, then deV;il me." Lou has many friends and thinks he can win in a walk. To disinterested persons the en...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 July 1918

STOLEN FROM THIEVES They Are So Careless.— Hippopotamus me.it is said to be as good as pork, but the rlwinees are that a lot of hippopotamuses niiiiiiiii: about would muss up a back yard almost as much as chickens.— Marion (Ohio Star. Dads Confession.— "Father," said the sniiill boy, "what is constructive criticism?" '" ( oust met ive criticism, my son. is your own lit I' talk which, if offered by some one else, would be called ordinary fault finding." -Washington Star. Cheerless Future. —We sometimes won der if it ever occurs to Austria that all she lihn to hope for even in the event of glori ous ;iikl complete ultimate victory is to be Imsscd ;i round for Ihe rest of her natural life !i\ ,i beery megalomaniac. —Ohio State •Journal. What Ya Mean—Attics? Poets in the olden Tiincs used to live lip in attics, bill Nowadays the attics Of ninny poets are I noccupied. —St. Louis Star. Doctor's Only Chance.—Wife : "Hollo! Dr. IJiiny.in .' Yes.' Conic right away. Mr. I,ill I clijis another...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 20 July 1918

/ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of. general information, but in. the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS One of Uncle Sam's bravest of the brave younjr men fell to his death when Quentin Roosevelt, a son of Theodore Roosevelt, was shot in an encounter with the Huns in an air battle last Wednesday. Of Quentin it can be said without fear of successful contradiction that he Avas a chip oft' the old block and all America had hoped he would...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 20 July 1918

TOWN TOPICS Periodically there is a call From white prisons arranging for Home kind of <-i show for the amusement of the white public for colored persons to attire themselves in the costumes of their former slave parents and parade themselves in i'ront of ;i iiapinu public for its entertainment and amuse mciii. Such white persons must think the colored persons are proud of the fact that they were once hiumin chattels and occu pied positions in the body politic of this re public on ;i par with the horse, mule and cat tle of the field. If there are any humiliating Features aboni a public function, whether of ,i personal, or patriotic nature, the colored man is alaways asked to perform that, but he is never wanted when the accomplish ments of ihis country are being paraded before the public. The very next time some one asks you to reaxsunie your former chattel alt ire. you will be perfectly justified in spittinLr in such person's face and follow that up with a fist full of tinners f...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 20 July 1918

the game. Though victorious the Cham pious are not boasting over their success and it is thought another series will be pulled off before the season closes. The Keystones will play in Tacoma next Sun day. Last Sunday's game was a pitcher's play, few men leaving the bat. POLITICAL POINTERS Two years ago the Woman's Political Al liance did some magnificent political work. It was however new at the business at that time, but should be in a much better posi tion to do political work now than two years ago. Two years ago Mrs. W. L. Presto was . president of the club and having had con siderable political experience she was able to take advantage of many seemingly, to persons less experienced, awkward situa tions that arose in the campaign. Let's hope the present president is equally versed. Next Sunday afternoon at 300 Main Street the King County Colored Republican Club will hold its regular monthly meet ing' to consider the approaching political situation. The coming primary promises to...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 20 July 1918

FROM THE "RECORD" By JAMES W. JOHNSON There are limes when the Congressional Record contains interesting reading matter. Sometimes it contains stuff that is funnier than what is found in our funny papers. And occasionally there are flashes of real wit in it. But generally speaking, it is rather dreary reading. On June %_'7. the Suffrage Amendment w;is up before the Senate, and Senator Thompson of Kansas made a good, old Fashioned, eloquent speech in support of it. lie opened his speech by saying: "Mr. President, from the beginning woman has played her part in the development of civilization. She has done her share toward maintaining the material welfare 1 of man kind and more than her share in advanc ing the moral welfare of the people. Yet, since Adam and Eve dwelt together in the (Jarden of Eden woman has been fighting for her rights before the world. Even her helpmate, man, early deserted her in her struggles. In the midst of ignorance, superstition, and oppression, she has been ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 July 1918

"7 *7 PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS The thoughts of that fifth drive must now be very offensive to the Germans. Evidently Germany does not want peace at any price from her last peace proposal. It occurs to us that the Huns now know that war is just what Sherman said it was. If Secretary McAdoo is not a iailroad employe in disguise then we are sadly mis taken. Organi...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 July 1918

TOWN TOPICS ■"In my opnion." said a Well known Se iittie citizen, "Ctister Chappelle has made the lust real estate buy of any one I know of. His place is about six blocks from the ccnler of Billiard and the lot is 108x140. It was Formerly owned by a thrifty German and he had all kinds of fruits and berries mi it and a very good house, all of "which Mr. Chappelle bought for $1300, the most dl' which he has already paid, lie is a long shoreman and earns anywhere from #150 to $200 per month. Such homes are Ihe kind that the working colored men should seek to get, for they are worth twice the down town city homes, where style is their chief feature." News from California report the death of Mrs. \V. J. Wiley, mother of Mrs. Will Tay lor, who had been bed fast for seven years. Mrs. Wiley, formerly Mrs. Elizabeth Ander son, resided in Seattle for thirty years. She went to California about a year ago with the hope that her health would be improved. .Mrs. Wiley leaves one daughter, three si...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 July 1918

POLITICAL PARAGRAPHS •lack Thatcher and Norman Wardall have issued an edict, so the editor hereof has been informed, that Cayton's Weekly must he hit hard, which we figure out to mean that not even the accustomed $°2 suhscrip tion must he given it. If so small an amount will control the editorial policy of the paper then fellows you are foolish to not pay the two bucks and own the paper for another two years. Billy Potts, late candidate for charity commissioner of King- county, is again in the hotel busines and is a hit sore over his turn down, although, as he now sees the matter, it was a hlessinp- in disguise for him, hut he is sore enough to throw a monkey wrench into the Republican machinery just for the fun of seeing the sparks fly, and yea. verily we suspect he will try to do so. John E. Ballaine is being urged by scores of friend to file for the state senate from the Thirty-second senatorial district and if he does he will come mighty close to pulling the persimmon. Ballaine ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 July 1918

THE NEGROES IN INDUSTRY Among the new groups of labor drawn in to industry by war conditions oven before we ourselves entered the war, were the Negroes of the South. Thousands of them were brought from rural southern states to northern industrial centers in 1915 and 1016. And the food production of the entire South \\as greatly disorganized. 'The Negroes have never been welcome in ihe labor movement. How much of this has been the fault of the Negro, fresh from the country districts and difficult to organize, ;iii<l how much of it has been the fault of the white workers, narrow in their race prejudice and jealousy guarding the bene fits of organization as a 'special privilege' need not be gone into here. "But shut out of the protection and re sponsibility ol' the unions, the Negroes have inevitably dragged down the workers who shut them out. They have deprived strik ers of their chance to return to work, and at the same time, by their mere entrance into industry in large numbers, ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 August 1918

US PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according; to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South MAKE IT UNANIMOUS Within the United States there are up wards of twelve million persons designated "colored" and almost another million off springs of white and colored folks so white that they are white—more...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 August 1918

SUPPRESS THE MOB SPIRIT My fellow countrymen: I take the lib erty of addressing you upon a subject which so vitally affects the honor of the nation and the very character and integrity of our institutions that I trust you will think me justified in speaking very plainly about it. I allude to the mob spirit which has re cently shown its head amongst us, not in any single region, but in many and widely separated parts of the country. There have been many lynchinga and every one of them has been a blow at the heart of ordered law and human justice. No man who loves America, no man who really cares for her fame and honor and character or who is truly loyal to her institutions can justify mob action while the courts of justice are open and the governments of the states and nation arc ready to do their duty. We are at this very moment fighting lawless passion. Germany lias outlawed herself among the nations because she has disregarded the sac red obligations of law and has made lynch ers ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 August 1918

TOWN TOPICS With the hope of improving the health of her daughter, Miss Gladys, Mrs. W. L. Presto left last Sunday evening for the sea shore in Oregon where she will remain for the next five weeks. Miss Gladys has had a long siege of illnss and though much im proved over what she was a couple of months ago, yet the family felt a change would completely restore her to health, hence the sea-side visit. Today the citizens of Seattle will ban quet the thirty-five drafted (colored) men, who will leave for Camp Lewis about 4 p. m. An elegant repast will be given them and speeches made by notables. Andrew R. Black will act as master of ceremonies and Will E. Humphrey will be the chief speaker. The war department is making an urgent call for all the colored drafted men in this section to be held in readiness for a call to duty. That was a magnificent meeting held at the Grace Presbyterian church last Tues day evening under the auspices of the Na tional Association (Seattle branch), not magn...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 August 1918

to string up Mr. Wilson's smart nigger Allen thai night. "T am sorry to see it but it is the best tiling for the community ;is he will ruin all the other niggers." and the conversation dropped without further comment.. It was about dusk when a very black, but handsome young woman approached a cabin on Mr. Wilson's farm and inquired of an elderly colored woman if Allen Davis lived there. "Yassum, and urn his inudder, what do you want wif him?" "I want to see Mr. Davis on very important business and I must see him now." Though uneducated, the aged colored lady realized thai the woman addressing her was not the ordinary plantation colored woman, and that she came bearing some important message for her son. High strung, well educated colored men in the South live in a semi state of dread, owing to the dis position of the whites to regulate "smart niggers," and the mother suspected some thing was wrong. As soon as possible Allen was found and introduced to the young woman. Without disclo...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 August 1918

X U PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South EDITORIAL PARAGRAPH lii addressing the drafted men and their friends last Saturday Will E. Humphrey recounted the fact that the colored man has always been loyal to the flag of this country and that in every ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 August 1918

North and they plan to Ilooverize their political powder for the presidential elec tion. Since the days of Buchanan the Democratic party has been a stench and a foul blot upon the pa^es of the history of this land of the free and it has not been improved by having control of the National government, which it acquired by murder and rapine. The court house ring is as busy as a bird dog in spring time just now endeavoring to perpetuate itself into power. When one runs over the political history of King County "its me and my wife, my son John ;iii<l his wife, us four, no more." Hun dreds of persons hold clerkships in the court house who, in all probability, would have to go to the county poor farm if they should happen to lose their parasitic jobs, ;iud they can be seen any time in the day chewing the rag in the halls and lavatories and even in the offices where they are em ployed, with each other or with friends, luit just now talking politics. In business circles one person will do...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 August 1918

county. The bulldozers had done their work well and the killing captain looked back over the bloody field of slain colored men and exclaimed. "it is well," and as John Murder strutted the streets, he was the idol of that "beautiful little county seat. lie had but one regret and that was Harrison Emancipator's kinky scalp did not dangle at his belt, not because Harrison had done any wrong but because he was too damn smart, and he frequently sent him word that "your time is coming." In every war in this country the colored soldiers became famous for their audacious bravery and it was always their clamor to be given the most difficult and dangerous undertakings to perform. Just how these people who had been cowed all their lives could develop such dare devil temperments on so short a notice, puzzled the world. Harrison, however, had not been in a war but he had been in a number of red hot political campaigns and at no time had he ever shown the white feather. However he was a good lose...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 August 1918

Cory Adams, B colored city mail currier of Kindlay. Ohio, sold Thrift and War Sav inus Stamps to the amount of $9,115.25, standing fourth in the United States in the April report of the V. S. Official Postal Guide. C;ip Jackson, a Negro of Walton County. (■■•l., has ;i son in the Army and $2,000 invested in Liberty bonds. The Walton Tribune has an editorial about him. The lion. Charles \Y. Anderson. Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue for New York City, has been made Honorary Colonel of lhe 367 th Colored Infantry of New York. • lini Boy, a colored man of Palestine, Texas, grows turkeys and gave one of his prize turkeys to the Red Cross. It has hern auctioned off for $588. Brown & Stevens, colored banks in Phil adelphia, Pa., broke the records of all col ored ins! it ut ions in the country by handling subscriptions amounting to $465,000 in Third Liberty Loan bonds. The colored people of Floyd County, Ga., purchased over $15,000 worth of Liberty bonds. A War Service Center, to b...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 24 August 1918

_ m m PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the ■tate of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and ' Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South 'SPECIAL PROSECUTOR" RE AMES "As long as such papers as Cayton's Weekly is permitted to be published the prejudice on the part of the whites will be kept alive," said U. S. ''Special Prosecutor" Reames to...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 24 August 1918

POLITICAL POT POURI There are not by one half as many actual Democrats in King county as there are colored voters and yet the Democrats main tain a party organization. The colored voters are Republican in politics, which party overwhelmingly dominates the poli tics of King county, all of which makes it necessary for the colored voter, if he de sires to have any influence in the party organization, to vote in the primary elec tion, and this you can not do if you do not register. If you voted at the last gen eral election in this city you do not have to register, but if you voted and have changed your residence you must re-register. The primary election is the place to get your works in. The fight for commissioner in the second district is a tripple header, cadi more or less formidable, and the final outcome at this writing can not even be forecasted. The applicants arc Lou C. Smith, *M. L. Hamilton and Herman Nelson. Two years ago Lou beat Nelson in the primaries, but that time he wa...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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