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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

no that it may be stopped with a corn cob); bury an old box or bar rel a short distance from the vat, and make a drain from the hole in vat to it, and there will be no dan ger of chickens or other stock drink ingit' • ~ • In Fig. 3 I give an inside view ot the vat, and in Fig. 4 a side eleva tion before before being let into the ground or floor. From the exit end of the vat extends the draiuing table, which should be about 4 feet wide and of any desired length, with the outer end elevated sd as to drain back into the vat with a strainer to catch any filth that might accumulate on the table. "I illustrate in Figs. 5 and 6 how to build the draining-table. Use for sills Ix 6 inch at intervals of 2 feet to nail the floor to. Say you make the first section 14 feet; you can let the next lap on the first and extend as far as you desire. Shape the sills as shown in Fig. 5, and regulate the pitch by the length of the legs as shown in Fig. 6. Set the sills in line, nail temporary strips on en...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

H Ranche and Range. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stookmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho. Montana. Utah and liritish Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit. Growers' Association-for Washington. Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. Subscription (in advowee) - - - $1.00 Per Year. HILLER FREEHAN, Addrenali eommnnloattom to RANCH X AND RANGE, liox MB, North Vakima, Washington. EDITORIAL NOTES. Good machinery properly used will materially lessen the cost of putting up the hay crop, and a less cost of production means a better profit. Scrub cattle are dear at any price, even as a gift. The best thing to do is to weed them out and replace them with choice bred ones. A thoroughbred is easily kept. The state of Illinois, at its recent legislative session, passed a law appropriating $50 for each county farm ers' institute. This is a good idea and may well be patterned after by other states. Guy L. Mcßichards asked at the Farmers' Insti tute, why farmers in good c...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

KITTITAS FARMERS' INSTITUTE. Continued from Page Five. We must first get some idea of why moisture is such an important factor, and how much of it plants require for their best development. Through every growing plant a stream of water is constantly flow ing. This stream begins at the roots and proceeds upwards to the leaves, being lost by evaporation from the surface of the leaves. The life of the plant depends on this stream. It brings the plant its food, and the amount of food the plant can obtain depends, amongst other things, on the amount of water that must flow up through a plant and out at its leaves for each pound of growth produce 4in the plant. The figures below show the water thus required to make a given growth of dry matter, that is, of plant ma terial free from water. It has been found that to produce one ton of dry matter (equivalent to about iy& tons of ordinary hay) there must pass up through the plant into the air not less than 233-912 tons of water. The dryer...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

to inches at a low estimate, while the loss under conditions that favor it may amount to probably twenty inches. By properly controlling evaporation we may save from a third to a half of the water added to the soil by rain or by irrigation. In the one caft* we can thus double the crop; in the other, save half the expense of water. The loss ot water by evaporation may be influenced in many waj's, some of which we can control and some we cannot. We have now reached the core of the apple, the real object of tillage. To under stand what effect tillage may have, we must understand that water is brought to the surface by the force of capillary attraction. When mois ture exists in a soil of uniform tex ture there is a strong force that tends to make the water scatter out uniformly in that soil. If moisture be lost from the surface, other moistures come up to its place. Soil may thus be dried out to a depth of four feet or more, if permitted to. This force acts much more strongly in a well ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

Horticulture. FRUIT CROP PROSPECTS. YAKIMA VALLKY. Apples in the Yakima valley will be a fair crop, and there will be quite a supply for export. Pears of nearly all kinds are promising a good yield., Bartletts especially are looking well. Al though there are but few commer cial pear orchards in Central Wash ington, there will be a larger crop this year than ever before. The prune crop is looking first first-class and will yield heavily. The dryers that are now erected are of sufficient capacity to handle but a small part of the crop. Italians are principally grown. Arrange ments are being made to ship green to market. Apricots will be a good crop. Peaches will be so light that it is doubtful if all the big orchards in the valley will more than supply the demand of Central Washing ton. It is evident that if the Sound people are depending upon Yakima valley to furnish them with peaches this year, they will go peach hun gry. If any section has any to ship it will be the Natcheez valley...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

12 Whs Hpiary. BUZZINGS. BY JANE. Reports from different localities are to the effect that bees are doing better than for years. Our beekeepers will have to be up and doing. California is even now shipping honey into our state by the carload. Applications of hone)-, remarks a medical quarterly, are said to quick ly relieve the pain and check the attack of erysipelas of the face. Extracted honey that has been stored in old combs is not usually of so fine a flavor and color as that stored in new combs. The Webfoot Planter asks about the locust tree, in regard to its hone}' yielding qualities. With us it is first-class -the honey white and of fine flavor. When to put on supers sometimes puzzles beginners. As a general rule, whenever bees multiply so that they are crowded in the hive or begin to hang out at the en trance. The bee is an important factor in the fertilization of the fruit bloom, and this alone should induce every orchardist to keep a few 7 colonies of bees. There is much t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

by mail, and there leave the cage so that the bees can have access to it till the time to let her out. In the evening of the same day, after the bees have all returned from the field and are quietly settled at home, I blow a little smoke into the en trance of the hive, wait a few mo ments till the bees have filled them selves with honey, then remove the cage and queen from the top of the hive, open the cage and allow the queen to run in at the entrance, as though she had always had her home there. The above method is simple and easy of accomplishment, and, with myself, as I have stated, is a thor ough success, so much so that I never use any other when honey is being gathered. It is a saving of time also to the bees, as the ne.v queen is sure to be laying freely within a few hours after introduc tion. One thing I will mention, though, I do not open a hive for three or four days, at least, after such introduction, for fear that by so doing the new queen might be injured by being "bal...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

14 I3ri@Fly Said. Joseph Keffer, of Tampico, has contracted four tons of hops to Ilorst & Lachmund at Be. Hop yards in Yakima valley have l>een injured to some extent by re cent winds, lessening somewhat the production. E. W. JohnSDti, representing Por ter Bros.' Commission Company, is soliciting consignments from the fruit growers of the Yakima valley. A. G. McNeil, Kiona, is planning to make a shipment of one or two carloads of hcrses to Chicago in a short time. Charles Meyer, Riteville, informs us the prospects for wheat in that section are grand. Three farmers adjoining his town, owning jointly 1800 acres, estimate that they will have between 35 and 40 bushels per acre. L. D. Lape, of Horseheaven, owning 1000 acres and renting 1000 more, all in wheat, says his crop this year will be the best he has ever had. He has a combined bind er and thresher which covers 40 acres per day. It requires thirty horses and four me:i to operate it. The citizens of Wenas valley are organizi...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

Markets. §f\J (BUTTKH; Seattle, much r.'C'l-k'.; WasI', ereainry 15916 lowa creamery 15p., . „ Taconia. ranch II; creamery It>!-£. Yakima. r nob 12@16c. creamery l"c. I Spokane, creamery 20c. CRIME. ', Seattle, new Wash, cream.... IOQ)tlo Taooma. '•, '• Wo Spokane—Full cream, I2@l.k\ skim milk !) 3,10 c. ! ' ' ■•-'• IIONK.Y, Yak I ma-comb 10c. Extracted !)c. Puget Hound" 12b, •' I(H\ Spokane " loc. .. :.' ',' 12c. HOGS. Seattle...'.'. .*..-...'... ...: ......'. 135.15c\ Tac0ma,.'.....'...:. ....." ;V-".!. Portland I** I }<"• Spokane 18^151. Yak1nifi..........a ..' liO*« •t'>l'\»■■•: '■-■ " I'OULTKY. Chickens— . Sea1 tie I'er doss. $3(Tr»3.00 Tacoma " " B®4.(W Portland '•' " " 5L»«8.*1 Spokane.... .....;........ " " <00.©«'.6J Ducks— Seattle " " «<»3.00 Spokane. "."4 Turkeys— » V • ■ ~ Seattle per Ib 100. Spokane " 1 '<-'• POTATOES. Seattle ! . East. Washington lOalJ Tacoma "- " 10® 12 Spokane *b©7 Yakitna ......i - CATTLE. Chicago- Common steers -I.."i(KTf.I.!K) Pr...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 July 1897

i 6 H J7=* POLSONWILTON HARDWARE CO. IjTl y^y^ 821-823 Western Avenue, y^f/S^YY |JUV^ Seattle, ■ ■ » - Washington. LI \JI/^i_^M^TNlM Wholesale and Retail I^^S^Wy FARM MACHINERY -*JSIII \w rt^*f^^r^^^rr^u]^^^^AAy Wagons, carriages, baying tools ~^*r —«^»^7 js\s/ harvesting machinery, field and Peering Ideal Mower, Roller and Ball Bearings. garden Seeds. PUITipS, Wlfld MlllS, &C. M jir\ v \$W#J N ajClt^& S Pullman Sleeping Cars Elegant Dining Cars Tourist ; Sleeping Cars Free Colonist Sleepers TO Sr. PAUL. CKOOKSTON, MINNEAPOLIS, WINNIPEG. DULUTII. HKLKNA and FA KGO; BUTTB. GRAND FORKS, Through Tickets to CHICAGO. WASHINGTON. NEW VOUKi I'IIII.\I>KU'IIIA, UOSTO'I iiii.l MX POINTS KABT I an,l SOU I'll. Time Schedule: v WEST-BOUND. No. 1 4:15 a. m. EAST-BOUND. No. 2 11 .-JO p. m. Through Tickets to Japan and China via Tacoma and Northern Pacific Steamship Co. For Information, rates, maps, time-cards and tickets, cull on or write O. A. Qft AH AM. Agent, North Yak I ma, Wash. Or...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

Ranche and Range. OM> SKHIKS. VOL. 87, NO. 4. I NKW SKKIKH, VI) 1,. 11. NO. 1. f CLEARING LANDS. Those who have established farms west of the Cas cade mountains are generally familiar with the work of clearing heavily timbered areas. The views we present in this issue are taken from the experimental station grounds at Puyallup. They give a good idea of the work required of a settler in that section in opening up a farm. And yet there are found in West em Washington the most profitable farms, and homes with the prettiest, freshest surroundings of thi entire Northwest. There are no extremes of temperature, the soil produces well, and the proximity to tide water with the continually growing cities and enlarging mar kets give an impetus to a steady development of farm ing lands and the founding of new homes is going steadily on. To one living in a prairie district the very thought of attempting to dispose of a single stump NORTH YAK IMA, WASH., JULY 8, 1897. such as we show today is ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

2 HortiauJtur®. J. E. BAKER. Career of Washington State's New Com missioner of Horticulture. J. X," Baker, the recently appoint ed Commissioner of Horticulture of the State of Washington, was born in Oswego County, New York in the year 1837. In 1857 he com menced business in Colxlin, Union County, Illinois, as a nurseryman and fruit and vegetable grower for the northern markets, making a specialty of small fruits and the propagation of market garden plants for sale, building large forcing frames for that purpose. In 1861 he enlisted in the 12th Illinois cavalry and continued in the service of the government until 1866. The last three years of this time were rendered in the capacity of cashier of the chief quartermas ter of the Department of Washing ton. 11l 1866 he resumed horticultural pursuits near Norfolk, Va.; was a pioneer in the culture of small fruits and conducted a large truck farm, supplying. the great northern cities with early vegetables, making a prominent feature of th...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

De Liaval "ALPHA" Cream Separators Creamery and Dait*y {Machinery and Supplies. M ni-jS|-i ... te? lpb*No< ' What the 1897 Wisconsin State Experiments Show: ' _Bpl ■ • That many "Alpha De Laval" machines in every day use are skimming as wonder jg^S- ~jL fully close as .03; that the average is from .05 to .065; and that but one machine out of fflgjipL-JS^x those personally tested by Prof. Farrinjjton was leaving more than .1. ■ifp^H. if That the "Reid-Danish" machines are leaving an average of three times as much fNtmtmSph p/if tllt '" the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." mill "fgi^^j/^ -CTF^/l\ That the "U. S." machines are leaving an average of three times as much fat in the ", \3e/S*^ tfijjgaf«k§rl skim milk as the "Pha-De Laval." jyWjj'.". -^jllPlf That the "Alexandra-Jumbo" machines are leaving an average of four times as liraW^ •"»" * J S//'^ißm£* much fat in the skim milk as the "Alpha-Dc Laval." /IfflWK ; v^'^ -^Mssik.. That the "Sharpies Imperial 'Russian" machines are ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

4 KITTITAS FARMERS' INSTITUTE. "Our Domestic Animals"-Paper Read by William A. Conant. First, is (rod's best gift to man, the horse, by some condemned and pronounced worthless because they think the bicycle, the electric car riage and delivery wagon, and steam engine will supersede him? I think differently. Along with the great depression in all lines of business, the horse got its full share of the low prices. What has been the result? Men have ceased to raise colts as they used to in the past. In the middle states not more than ten colts are reared where six or seven years ago a hundred was nearer the number. Hardly a colt is seen in New England, and very few are raised in Europe. What follows? Men must have horses, no matter what machines are in vented. A man who is not more of a brute than a horse loves a good horse next to wife and children, and there always will be thousands of employments and places for horses. First-class stock for driving pur poses, and heavy draft horses f...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

ADVERTISING FOR FARMERS. In what way can that vile com pound, which Mark Twain said was made from lampblack and molasses, be made to assist us in disposing ot our surplus products in a profitable way? asks Mr. Fluke. The answer is, in its judicious use in advertis ing. A karmkr's ADVERTISING. I have a cow for sale. I write to the publishers of some farm paper, telling them what kind of a cow I have. Next week there will appear in that paper an advertisement which will read something like this: "For sale —Fine Jersey cow, St. Lambert breeding, gentle, good size and color, an extra milker, makes so many pounds of butter per week, price so much; reference, T. B." That little item goes into thousands of homes, is read by thousands of people; 150 want to buy a cow; 75 will write to me about it, and one of them will buy her for $10 or $15 more than I can get for her at home. In addition to that I have a string to the other 74 fellows, and ever} 7 little while they will be wanting to know ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

6 Wtis Dairy, MRS. M3RRISON'S JERSEYS. BY FRANK RKDIG. Recently I visited Mrs. Morri son's dairy farm at Snohomish. She has a herd of full-blood ani mals. She does not keep a cow in the herd that makes less than i % pounds of butter per day for 365 days in the year; neither does she tolerate a heifer whose milk tests less than 4.6 per cent. She has one cow in her herd that has been milked 14 months and gives 32 pounds of 4 per cent milk. She recently sold a cow to F. H. Gloyd that calved the 14th day of April, 1896, and on the 18th day of June of this year she gave betwe&n 20 and 21 pounds of 5.4 milk, and will drop a calf the latter part of July. Her stock are of the Stoke Pogis the sth, Rampos Duke, Landseer and Farmer's Glory strains. She keeps a tally sheet and set of scales. Every milking is weighed night and morning the year through. Keeping the tally sheet is not only a good index as to what each cow is doing, but develops the interest of the hired man in his work. He wil...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

GOOD VS. POOR COWS. The ability to utilize food profit ably and convert it into iriilk and butter is an individual character istic, in which there is an immense variation among cows. The difference in the profits from keeping good, medium, and poor cows has been strikingly illustrated by the experiment stations in their herd records and in various feeding experiments. Thus, a bulletin of the Utah sta tion, giving the record of 15 cows for one year v shows that the cost of food eaten for each 100 pounds of milk produced varied with different cows from 29.48 to 52.07 c. The cost of food per pound of butter ranged from 5.91 to 11.8 cm the case of different cows, and with butter at 20c per pound the net profit from a cow for one year ranged all the way from $14.71 to $51.37- The cows were common na tives, and grades, selected with con siderable care. A recent experi ment at the Penn sylvania station touches on this point. Nine cows, mostly Jerseys and grade Guernseys, were fed in an ex ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

8 Ranche and Range. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmen of Washington, Oregon, Idaho. Montana, I'tah and British Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association-for Washington^ Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. Subscription (in advance) - - - t«-00 Per Year. HILLER FREEHAN, Address all communications to RANCHE AND RANGE, Box fififi, North Yakima, Washington. • EDITORIAL NOTES. Contributors wishing their manuscript returned must enclose stamps ro pay postage. Germany, it is said, will shut out American oleo margarine. We can stand any quantity of that kind of retaliation. A smile should now play around the corners of the improved stockbreeder's mouth —at least the one who is stocked up with good animals. Our stock indus tries have been running down hill long enough, and now the up-grade seems to have been reached. Prospects continue to brighten throughout the North west for grain crops. In the eastern part of this state wheat and oats ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

MAKING THE HOME ATTRACTIVE. BY C. L. Editor Ranche and Range:— I have been reading your paper ever since its first issue. I believe its motive is the advancement and improvement of the ranche and its products, Its pages are filled with splendid ideas of how to grow for a profit all the various products of the farm, what stock and poultry pay best and how to care for them in order to get the most money from them. Pardon me for saying a word or two in regard to the home where the wife and daughters must spend their whole time and the lord and master (as he terms himself) spends at least one-half of each twenty-four hours. Let us look not at one house but at more than half of the homes of our farmers. The front yard, if not grown up to weeds, is plowed up, and in stead of being seed ed into a nice lawn is growing the lux uriant potato, cab bage or bean. If any shrubs have in former years been planted out, with the idea of beauti fying the plat, they have been allowed to grow at will un...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 8 July 1897

IO Vti@ Flacks. SHEEP SCAB. Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, in a recent article in the Sheep Breeder says about scab extermina tion: "Concerning the importance to the sheep industry of eradicating sheep scab from the United States there can scarcely be two opinions. The direct losses from this disease are not only very heavy and contin uous, but the indirect losses from having our live sheep prohibited from the markets of continental Kurope and killed upon the docks of Great Britain are also enormous. "This department is endeavoring to diminish the distribution of the disease by prohibiting the shipment of affected animals from one state to another, and by requiring that sheep shipped from the stockyards for feeding purposes shall be first properly dipped. There has been great difficulty in enforcing such regulations on account of imperfect authority in the statutes, and a bill has been pending for the last two years' which, if passed, would en able an active movement to be made fo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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