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Elephind.com contains 317 items from Polynesian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 29 May 1841

TTIHIIE POLYNESIAN PUBLISHED WEEKLY, AT HONOLULU, OAHU, SANDWICH ISLANDS. . JARVES, Editor. SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1841. Vol. I.-IYo. 31. SELECTED. From Blackwood's Magazine. JERUSALEM. JTast as is the period, and singular as the changes ol huropcan history since Christian era, Judca still continues to the most interesting portion of the Id. Among other purposes, it mav for the purpose of fixing the general upon this extraordinary land, that it hecn periodically visited lv a more iking succession of great public calam- s than perhaps any other region. With l to attract an invader than any other spicuous land of the East, it has been tantly exposed to invasion. Its ruin the Romans in the first century did prevent its being assailed by almost ry barbarian, who, in turn, assumed precarious sovereignty ot the neigh- ft . J incr Asia. Alter aires o obscure mise- ,y w a new terror came in the Saracen in- i t a A ion, which, under Amrou, on the con st of Damascus, rolled on Palestine. siege of ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 29 May 1841

202 Tur. Passion ton (1 kntility. Moial ists, whose efforts art; directed to the elu cidation of the causes of these vices iind follies which effect society, and whose main object is the improvement of our so cial condition, seem, in a great measure, to be blind to what should justly be con sidered as the basis of a vast deal of the evils they deplore, and hope to amend, namely, the passion for enlility of as piring not only to live in a st!e elccide edly beyond the means for ils support, but affecting to despise every tiling both in nature and in ai t which il is not fash ionable to admire; thus often sacrificing health and mental quietude during a whole lifetime in the vain pursuit of an imaginary good. It. is time that this spe cies of folly and fanaticism should bo the theme of special ami unsparing animad version by public writers and lecturers on all convenient occasions. The desire of shining in a sphere above our own, is like an epidemic disease; and people who la bor under ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 29 May 1841

11. Lived at Valparaiso from llio Janeiro the i mit-r bound to Cnllao, thence to thu is niU on a cruise. Markets on the coast La- very heavily stocked with goods! pri- U low. The Don Quixote, Paty, was to til lor'Iahiti and this port in a week alter ,1 Gloucester loll, By the latter we have k-eived our regular files of papers, which Lwcver contain no important intelligence it had not been previously received. Louis iijioleun has been condemned to perpetual lipris'Miiiunt for his rash attempt upon ranee. business in the United States was improv er prices of domestic goods rising. It Ian thought that the change of the adminis jation would have a favorable eifect upou country. v The Gloucester has brought out two large Vn Sugar Mills; also apparatus for extiact- r oil from the Kuikui nuts. V' THE POLYNESIAN. Some skeptical friends are disnosed to lake light of our earthquake, and insinuate at " It to be taken Should be well shaken." Vc told the tale as it was told us, and if ir t.uth i...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 29 May 1841

204 THE POLYNESIAN POETP.7. ODE TO LIBERTY. BY THE BOSTON BARD. When Freedom, 'neath the battle storm, Her weary head reclined; And round her lair majestic form Oppression fain had twined, Amidst the din, beneath the cloud, Great Washington appear'd, With daring hand, roll'd back tho shroud, And thus the sufF'rer cheer'd. " Spurn spurn despair! be great be free, With giant strength arise; Stretch stretch thy pinions, Liberty, Thy Hag plant in the skies: Clothe clothe thyself in glory's robe, Let stars thy banners gem; Rule rule the sea, possess the globe, Wear victory's diadem. Go tell the world a world is born, Another orb gives light, Another sun illumes the rnorn, Another star the night. Be just, be brave, and let thy name, Henceforth Columbia be; Wear wear the oaken wreath of fame, The wreath of Liberty. He said and lo! the stars of night, Forth to her banner flew, And morn with pencil dipp'd in light, Her blushes on it threw, Columbia's chieftain seized the prize, All gloriousl...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 5 June 1841

W3 tVfo 1 i O -La u , 7-..T. M 1 A 1 iut A 'it nwiwMftttj mj.hi wijmuyii wumwijnww PUIJLISHKJ) WLLKLV, AT HONOLULU, OAIIU. SAXDVICII ISLANDS. . JAllVLS, Editor. SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1841. Vol. I.-io. GfS, h r. i. i:cr r. i. 4 Till-: TWO PAT1IKHS. n- inoKi;sou wii.son. 'here xvas the sound of stilled sobbing bughout the whole house, the fires v. extinct on all the hearths, and by dimmer of neglected lights small Ints of weening friends were sitting in Jotu rooms, .silent, oc now and then ut- ag a few words from which all the ( s of hope had faded away, and that i their hearts, at intervals, like the toll of the passing bell. In one Itrtineiit there was a perfect hush, and more motion than on a Iroen sea. jen in lay on her death-bed, but still .;it Iiimlt, as sweet a child as ever fold ;;f hands before (iod over her eounten tc white as the shrouded sheet, her nts had long been hanging, and drop ,r their last kisses .011 the closed uneon- 1 1 111111 hns eves ne wnose sum laid been 111 11 ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 5 June 1841

206 THE POLYNESIAN. blcms of genuine magnilknce! 1 can ex plore the streaks of a tulip, and snuff up the fragrance of the violet, with an indescribable pleasure which art can never afford. I can even dissect a bramble, and discover beau ties in its repulsive branches, and no in glorious plant cither, since it was once soli cited to become sovereign of the forest. I had never such a conception of Kden before, where 44 all things smiled. " It is customa ry to form parties and to spend days in the gardens, pitching a tent, kc, ut this is un necessary, since the night air gives no hu midity. Give a 44 panabad, " or sixpence, to the proprietor' you may remaw in his gar den all day and choice yourself with fruit, which forms much of the summer food of the Persians. The prince had other large gar dens near Tabreez, his occasional resort, but more particularly for that of his house hold. From a very interesting Paper in the Monthly, entitled 44 Persian Reminiscen ces. " mill? Tfr iriTrm i t...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 5 June 1841

THE POLYNESIAN. 207 Uernplary christian. In 1832 she was' buted this answer to her delirium and re- Jtized by Rev. Mr. Ely at Kaawaloa, Ve which time her life has been a contin pcatcd the question. She replied again follow Jesus Christ. " Thus manifesto!" testimony to the value and power of the ! that even when tottcrinir reason no longer Jgion she professed. At the death of her, governed the mind her religious principles ,ana sue succeeuuu mm in me omce 01 , remained firm. The ruling desire of the istratc over Kau and South Kona, con- mind 3 sa,a to romain firtn ,Pfl,h. It ,g a population of between eight nud clearly so with her. Through tht ni-ht she thousand. This office she held till her th, residing at Kaawaloa and exerting nd her a most salutary influence in fa- ufpure religion, good order and civiliza . All who have visited her residence hear testimony to the truth of these uncut. r ilth ugh more than thirty years of age jn the religion of the Bible was first in- Suced here, ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 5 June 1841

-J u H 3 :Tif" """" '" - - 4 v THE POLYNESIAN l imn t!io N int'ickol iiuLiii cr. Till: tfliXiSMAN TO 1113 UOAT's CI1KW, WHILST U.YlMi t'UOM A KTOHM. Bravely! bravely heave at the oar, Speed away to the misty shore; Black U tho cloud that hangs o'er our lee, Ready to pour its wrath on the sea, And our trim hark is all too tight, To meet the tempest in its might. Pull, my lads, pull, ere tin; blasts descend, And clouds and waves in tumult blend. Tlje Prigi'.tp Birds, by instinct led, Have loll I heir rolling, watery bed, And steadily and calmly sail Above the sweep of the swelling gale; The Petrel ' too, Iws quit its rest Upon the blue wave's milky crest. Pull, men, pull ! yield your strength to the oar; Pull, men, pull! loud the distant winds roar. The " Sun-dog," dressed in bluo and green, This morning in the sky was seen, And round the moon at overnight Appeared a halo large and bright Sure omens of disastrous blow, As skilful mariners well know. Pull, men, pull! yon breakers run h...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 12 June 1841

AM Ha J. JAKVI3S, Eilitor. SATURDAY, JIJA'I? 13, 18-11. Vol. IVo. 1. THIS POLYN From the Phil. Cli. Observer. THY HAY, SO HHAI.I. Til Y felHKNOTli Hi:." When adverse wind nnd waves arise, A:nl i" my heart despondent e sihs When life her thronj; of cares reveals, sAml weikness o'er my piril steals, iiMict'il I hear the kind decree, h h.it, "a my day, my tOruiilli dial! be." tWhcii, with sad footstep, memory rove.", jWid smit ton joy and buried love lien sleep my te uful pillow flies, JAnd dewy morning drinks my sighs . jFiill lo thy promise, Lord, I tlee, jl'liat, "as my day, my strength shall be." jpiii; tri ll more must yet he past, tine pani the keenest, and the last , And when, wilh brow eonvulsed and pale, ; ! feeble, piiveriir.j heart-strings fail, .iRfilcciner, icrnnt my soul to see, Tint, "as the d iv, her strength shall be." t,. h.s. J ' lj; iron. Hunt's Meivlnnts' .M ininc for ov. IS 10. -Tin-: amf.iucax wiiai.f. nsnniv. iTlic origin of the whale fishery wo may tly trace to...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 12 June 1841

THE POLYNESIAN. JtNf scls engaged in the wlinlttiu business from (this measure, was to cut nil Nantucket this port was six, all of them sloops of from a considerable portion of it foreign from thirty to foity tons burden, ami pro- market ; . jd the American wlialo trncle ducing 1100, amounting in our turren- was not sensibly diminished, us its con cy to (jjt -1,888 83. 'sumption was enlarged in various parts of Sudi wus ihc germ of the whale fishery the world, and even the; exportation to in this country, and circumstances trans- Kmdand continued tr he carried on. As spired which wen; calculated to extend new coasts were explored, the field of the X few vears previous to "the revolution, the breeze would die away entire",, &r. the average price in nmrkct lor spennaceu ; K Hvr r.v.n ,., rocki,,,,, oil was about 10. and for head matter j twisting about in the vexed waves, mnd.l.fc, :0. Common whale oil was seventy dollars per ton, and the bone was about half a dollar per pound. As...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 12 June 1841

1-1 T 11 i; 1 () L Y N i: !S I A X . i rl lie tempt not Providence again by iilar venture, and shakes himself w ell to uer whether he takes ashore nil the he carried aboard. A day or two suf for theiri to recover their vertical p'ti nnd it is their owner's fault, if the cool 1 1 l 1 1 ..! .1 ICS arm veiuum itiiiuscapes oi iauni uo I jjiakc the voyager in a short time forget l is past troubles, and enter upon all the l scenes with a freshness of spirit and Wss of relish, enhanced by the dillicul- l ixperienced in reaching them. V i following is part of a poem which we I ( received, and which promises to be as I as racy, metrical and elegant as Pop f ns'f Fredoniad For fear of an irre- t lale injury to the stomachs of our rend er ty giving too great a dose at once, we l ' in only the following verses, in which outwatd delights, and internal pleasures C v .J " mid channel" are go graphically de- K " td, and feelingly descanted upon, that tly(ircc of sympathy may prove too much fcrthem,...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 12 June 1841

T H E POLYNESIA xr . J IN SELECTED. War War! what miseries nre henped to gether in the sound! What an accumulation of curses is breathed in that one word. To us, happy in our insular position, wo have, within existing memory, known chiefly of war by its pomp and circumstance alone; the gay parade, the glancing arms, the bright colors, the inspiring music these arc what wo see of war in its outset; glry, and praise, and badges of honor, these are what appear to us as its result. The favorite son, tho beloved brother, he who, perhaps, is dearer still, returns to the home of his youth or of his heart, having sown danger and reaped renown. Thus wo do look on war. But ask the inhabitant of a country ?7m7t ha been the scat of tear, what is fus opinion of it. He will tell you that he has seen his country ravaged, his homo violated, his fam ily . But no! the tongue recoils from speaking tho horrors and atrocities of war thus brought into the bosom of a peaceful home. All the amenities and c...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 19 June 1841

J. JAKVISS, Editor. SATUKIMY, .HLI3 10, 1SS1. Vol. St. No. 2. FOE TP. 7. -a J -ti i if Till: T It I U .M 1' 1 1 OF WOMAN. In distant time, when b.irb'ious man In ceaseless contests warred, And, crushed by strife's relentless ban, All social io ice was marred; Worn m as umpire interposed, With plaintive eye rebuked Tin; s iii,Miino broil, The tumult closed Suite ceased where'er she looked. Or, if winie rut bless monster still Her winning power defied, Willi tamo submission to her will, lie yielded when he tightd. If some crime-fostered son of Cain TI.e bond of peace upript, To s'rict obodieme iorctd aain, lie jiauted when woman wept. When thus she wan wi'li victory blest, Her tears away she brushed; And, w liihi rude man her w oi l b confessed. W ith modest pride sliublunhed. No v all entranced ho i;acd, and spoko I lis love iu language vild; Then oerhis heart, to seil her yoke, Willi ho.uenly grace situ tiniled. hi!e thus before man's spell-bound eyes Chum afei charm uiispnai;, He l...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 19 June 1841

( loss a sum than $ IHUWO, and whilo tho hull not iinfrcaucntlv rosts more, while many have sailed whoso total cost . docs not varv far from ,900,000. The principal kind of provisions required for the crew upon their voyage, consists of beef and pork, bread, molasses, peas, beans, corn, potatoes, dried apples, coti'ee, tea, chocolate, butter, besides from three to four thousand of casks, made from white oak, and a quantity of spare duck, cordage, and other articles which may be required in the course of the voyage. In a ship which mans four boats, from thirty to thirty-two men are employed. The contract entered into between the crew and the owners of the ship, and contained in the shipping articles that arc required to be signed by each sailor, makes it bind ing on the owners to provide the ship and all the necessary outlays of the voyage, and upon the crew to perform their duty on board the ship, obeying all proper or ders to the end of the voyage. As a compensation, they are entit...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 19 June 1841

til. THE POLYNESIAN. 111... .m r I I tl v e u'u ,,fi wit-iu iiiuiuMi. i ciiei c ilimhlimil i. Aolc coi aku n;i innknliiL-i (nun o kc kanalima. A ina maluln mni la, oia no, e like nuo me ka ae like ana ;i ma n:ina ka olelo. Ina pokole ka iava e hooliiualima'i, alalia, uole nut ka i. ina kii i Ka inanawa a Uanalima ma pti nku ka uku. Aka, uole pono e 'jiiii Ka uku o ieiaiu c iiito me kekahi o f i i: i: i I. lit i iiooiiiii.inmjt m 1 Kcia inau niaka Ink i I'liiii. Ina nokole ka innnnwa n m Kn,.. JiiiM ana, oia ka lioolimaliiua oliiolu loa. I n;i mca pahalc a nan. a me tin mm ni V nituo ia lakou ke hole ina Kiaaina ilo l ' I i i d Kci.i iiiiovniimi, u lo.i.i Ka paiapaia e i ko lakou paliale a me ko lakou aina. (' ka la kunakolu kumamakahi o Mci holo t olelo i na'lii, a me ka poe i kohoia, l.jila, ke kakau nci maua i ko maua inoa, illia aku a lohe na liuole a pau e noho nci it ntakou nina. Kauin na inoa o !'; KAMEHAMEHA III. KEKAULUOHI. lWSSENCJERS. In the Clementine from Kauai, Mrs Tay ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 19 June 1841

1 8 THE POLYNESIAN. g ELECT L I). Tiikf.e Bad 1 1 a dit '1'lierc are three weaknesses in our habila which aio very common, anil which Imw: a ery prejudicial influence on our welfare. The lirt is giving way to the eas:o of indulgence of the mo ment, instead of doing ui once what ought to be done. This practice almost always di minishes the beneficial eiieets of out actions, and often leads ns to abstain from action al together; as, for instance, if at this season ot the year there is u gleam of sunshine, of which we feel we ought to take advantage, but have not the resolution to leave at the moment a comfortable seat, or an attractive occupation, we miss the most favorable op portunity, and perhaps justify ouisclves in lemainiug in doors, on the ground that the time for exercise is past. One evil attend ant upon the habit of procrastination is, that it produces a certain dissatisfaction . of the mind which impedes and deranges the animal functions, and tends to prevent the attain men...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 June 1841

1 ft: THE POLfNE AN Iti i j. jakves, Editor. SATURDAY, JILK G, Vol, I'o. 3. A iiii i Kid 111:"' if I" m; lion- tin'1 nil- nil iiuf km. V.jom llnnfV McrtliJiitrt' Miiigaziuc ftr Nov. -vnn: amkihcax wham: i lsnr.itv. ' '". v Coiitintieil from i;io (i. f'''hc right whale, which, with the sperm, spout hole, which, in the dead animal, ap pears in form like the letter S. In the upper part of the head is a large triangu lar cavity which is called the " case," con CM t3litutes the principal object pursued I tainihg the oily fluid that after death is iy ine wuaiu iisncry, is oi me largest 'clzi- Many which were taken in 1701, XYtfce Gulf of St. Lawrence, it is stated, .iduced two hundred and thirty barrels cf Oil ; and as the ships then employed "O hot exceed sixty tons burden, thecap trrs of a single whale constituted a full iCTo. The bone from a whale of this sometimes weighed 3000 pounds, Ch of which was worth a dollar, and the i'Ji were frequently ten feet in length. Their food consists ...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 June 1841

10 THE POLYNESIAN. JlN leu a prey to the liarpouti. The males , ping, it will remain in u very precarious state; swim in schools until they arc about three some years languishing to almost nothing, fourths grown, when they separate and ; at others brisk and profitable. This year, seek their prey upon the ocean alone. I owing to the low prices and stagnation of The difference between them and the fo- j business in the United States, and the coin male droves is evident and striking from ' petition between merchants of rival nations, the fact that when one of their number is. this market has been flooded u ith goods, and struck it is left to its fate, scarcely an in 2o0 tons of sugar. The largo iron mill, which came by the Gloucester can turn out four tons of sugar daily; when this with the two others that have been recently imported have been set up, and sufficient land cultiva ted to keep them supplied with cane, they stance being known of its companions ! umucr among whom the reduce...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 June 1841

10 Jobberies and Housebreaking are becom- .lilt i-' v iiiuv u; ci i ii. ocvuiui gi-s, within a few night9 past, have been ion into and robbed, in the most daring Inor. it ncnooves all to be on the alert Jccure the villains, for notwithstanding ' I frequency and daring nature of their at v Ws, they have never been detected, ; Jgh frequently seen. lis Hawaiian Majesty and Her Exccl- y Kekauluohi and suites, left on Mon- (' last in the ship Bartholomew (jSosnold on ( it of state to Kauai. We hope- that an ( 'initiation of the agricultural enterprises I )at piaiter, will favorably impress them irch their general introduction and en- ( ;agcment in their kingdom. . ;y.'. .lc annual meeting of the king and chiefs V ;h commenced April 1st, was adjourned vie 30th ult. after a busy and interesting f Jon, having made some important modi i'.'Jiona in the existing laws, besides passing !la number of new acts. They also have rrctdto establish something like penitentia riVfor the reformation of cr...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Polynesian. — 26 June 1841

12 THE POLYNESIAN. Jos M E I. K C T K J). Spot ok Cavtai.v Cook's Death. The rock m somewhat insulated, and at high tide the water breaks over its summit. It is said to be, at present, not one-fourth its original size, as ulmost every visiter, for a number ot years, has been in the habit of carrying away a fragment of it as a relic. A French man-of-war, which was lately here, is said to have taken oil' about a ton of it; and some Spaniards, who visited the island several years since, not only took specimens of the rock, but the whole ship's company knelt upon it, and offered up a prater for the hero's soul. Townscnd'n Sporting Tour in the Rocky Mountains. The London Review contains the follow ing just tribute to the father of American in dependence. "Since the reign of Washington in the respect and admiration of mankind, the stan dard of heroic greatness has been changed real action has taken the place of theatri cal; public life is no longer a stage to strut and mouth on, but a tru...

Publication Title: Polynesian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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