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Elephind.com contains 888 items from C21 Resources, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Getting Our Heads Together [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Getting Our Heads Together BY SIDNEY CALLAHAN Today there exists very little activity that can be described with the exclusive term "American Catholic intellectual life." Educated Catholics have been assimilated into the larger culture and now find themselves subject to the same general social conditions that militate against all varieties of intellectual life in this country. Within the Catholic community there are other forces that further impede intellectual dialogue. Our present situation, in my view, represents a decline from the level of recent previous decades. But mere nostalgia will not restore the intellectual and spiritual liveliness of a simpler time, with its clear-cut verities. If Catholics are to fashion new creative strategies, we must first come to terms with current social realities. When I use the term "intellectual life," I mean something broader than narrowly focused academic scholarship, or highly specialized scientific work, or the current state of education i...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THOMAS AQUINAS: [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

THOMAS AQUINAS: It was necessary for human salvation that there should be a knowledge revealed by God besides philosophical science built up by human reason. From Summa Theologica I, 1.11 This doctrine is wisdom above all human wisdom; not merely in any one order, but absolutely. For since it is the part of a wise person to arrange and to judge, and since lesser matters should be judged in the light of some higher principle, one is said to be wise in any one order who considers the highest principle in that order: thus in the order of building, the one who plans the form of the house is called wise and architect, in opposition to the inferior laborers who trim the wood and make ready the stones: "As a wise architect, I have laid the foundation". From Summa Theologica /, 1.6

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
POPE JOHN PAUL 11, FROM THE ENCYCLICAL FAITH AND REASON (1998) [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

POPE JOHN PAUL 11, FROM THE ENCYCLICAL FAITH AND REASON (1998) Faith and reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth; and God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth—in a word, to know himself—so that, by knowing and loving God, men and women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves. In both East and West, we may trace a journey which has led humanity down the centuries to meet and engage truth more and more deeply. It is a journey which has unfolded—as it must —within the horizon of personal self-conscious-ness: the more human beings know reality and the world, the more they know themselves in their uniqueness, with the question of the meaning of things and of their very existence becoming ever more pressing. This is why all that is the object of our knowledge becomes a part of our life. The admonition "Know yourself' was carved on the temple portal at Delphi, as testimony to a basic truth to be adopted as ...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? BY ROSANNA F. DEMARCO At the center of my education as a graduate student at Boston College and now as a faculty member in the Connell School of Nursing is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. I characterize a Catholic intellectual tradition as rigorous scholarship based in 1) a reflective spirit of inquiry, 2) ethical values, and 3) knowledge developed and shared with my students so they may continue a circle of engaged service to others. My clinical specialty is community/public health nursing science. By the nature of this concentration it is very easy for me to contemplate and reflect on persons' lives in their neighborhoods and how their living and wellness intersects with dreams and realities. It is here where I work with women living with HIV and AIDS. Many of the women I have come to know live in the inner city of Boston. They are poor and have had lives that have empowered and disempowered them and their families cyclically. I ha...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Stewards of the Tradition [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Stewards of the Tradition BY ROBERT P. IMBELLI The rubric under which this evening's presentation is placed is "Stewards of the Tradition." My own contribution will be to focus our attention upon what I consider to be the very heart and center of the Catholic intellectual (or, as I prefer, "wisdom") tradition: the Lord Jesus Christ himself. My presentation will be in three parts. First, I will consider the notion of tradition and defend the claim that Jesus Christ is indeed the living center of the tradition. Second, I will suggest that the "crisis" of the Catholic intellectual tradition is, at its most profound, a Christological crisis. Third, I will hazard some suggestions regarding the context of the Catholic college and university and the challenge of reaffirming the Christie center. Because of limitations of time, all this will be done briefly, but, I hope, in a way suggestive of further development. The Christie Center of Tradition In considering "tradition," I find it helpful...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CATHERINE OF SIENA: [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

CATHERINE OF SIENA: Then, dearest son, open the eye of thine intellect in the light of most holy faith, and behold how much thou art beloved of God. Letter to Neri Di Landoccio Dei Pagliaresi

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
JOHN HENRY NEWMAN: [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

JOHN HENRY NEWMAN: Truth is the object of Knowledge of whatever kind; and when we inquire what is meant by Truth, I suppose it is right to answer that Truth means facts and their relations, which stand toward each other pretty much as subjects and predicates in logic. All that exists, as contemplated by the human mind, forms one large system or complex fact, and this of course resolves itself into an indefinite number of particular facts, which, as being portions of a whole, have countless relations of every kind, one toward another. Knowledge is the apprehension of these facts, whether in themselves, or in their mutual positions and bearings. And, as all taken together form one integral subject for contemplation, so there are no natural or real limits between part and part; one is ever running into another; all, as viewed by the mind, are combined together, and possess a correlative character one with another, from the internal mysteries of the Divine Essence down to our own sensat...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? The first Christians—drawn together by their faith in the significance of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth—were members of Jewish communities embedded in a Roman political system and in a linguistic and intellectual culture that was largely Greek in origin. As the Christian "way" moved beyond these Jewish communities, attracted Gentile converts, and spread, a Christian intellectual tradition or, better, a constellation of traditions developed in the diverse regions where Christian faith took root —theologies, philosophies, artistic currents, systems of legal thought and political theory, which were the product of a continuous dialogue between faith and cultures. With the fragmentation of the Christian churches, especially in the 15th and 16th centuries, the Catholic intellectual tradition in the West developed its own characteristics. Since the medieval period, one of its principal venues has been the university. Thi...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
From Tolerance to Engagement in Catholic Higher Education [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

From Tolerance to Engagement in Catholic Higher Education BY JOHN C. HAUGHEY, S.J. On February 3, Woodstock fellow John Haughey, S.J., received the second annual Monika K. Hellwig Award from the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities for "outstanding contributions to Catholic intellectual life." He delivered the following remarks to the presidents of Catholic colleges and universities, gathered for that occasion. The 220 Catholic higher education institutions in this country are doing an extraordinary thing. But I wonder whether their leaders have thought about the potential their work has for the future self-understanding of Roman Catholicism itself. These institutions host a bewildering number of pluralisms—academic, ethnic, religious, racial, economic—and do so in a way that has made a home for many voices and values and traditions and bodies of knowledge. But the hospitality accorded by these institutions has not been sufficiently attentive to their uniqueness or oppo...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Yeast: A Parable for Catholic Higher Education [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Yeast: A Parable for Catholic Higher Education BY WALTER ONG, S.J. It is common knowledge that the problem of pluralism today increasingly haunts Catholic institutions of higher education, that is, colleges and universities founded under specifically Catholic auspices and now having to redesign themselves in our present educational world. We think particularly of such institutions in the United States, where they have existed in far higher proportion than in any other part of the world. But the problem is worldwide. In the forefront are such matters as faculties that include many members who are not Catholic, student bodies equally diversified in their religious commitments or lack thereof, questions of academic freedom, and, to cap it all, the clear desire of Catholic institutions of higher education to open themselves to persons and points of view other than exclusively Catholic while maintaining a genuine Catholic identity. To this should be added a new awareness of the flexibili...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Catholic Intellectual Tradition in the Public Square [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Catholic Intellectual Tradition in the Public Square BY ALAN WOLFE Non-Catholics routinely find in Catholicism something missing in their own religious or intellectual traditions. For those unhappy with the direction the modern world has taken, especially in the years since the cultural revolution of the 19605, Catholicism stands as a mighty alternative. As Peter Berger wrote in 1967, "Catholicism, for reasons intrinsic to its tradition, has tried hardest in maintaining a staunchly resistant stance in the face of secularization and pluralism, and indeed has tried down to our own century to engage in vigorous counterattacks designed to reestablish something like Christendom at least within limited territories." Or, as the theologian Stanley Hauerwas, a Methodist, puts it more recently (and more succinctly), "Catholics, more than any other people, must resist the presumption of modernity." Reading comments like these, I am reminded of the work of a first-rate journalist named Alan Ehr...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? BY T. FRANK KENNEDY, S.J. In 1982 after doctoral studies in music history at the University of California, I began teaching at a Jesuit college. In preparing my classes I quickly realized something that I had never noticed as a grad student. One could teach the history of western civilization through the history of western, sacred music, if one wanted to do so. I suppose that this was the first time I confronted part of the breadth of what we refer to as the "Catholic Intellectual Tradition." The first thought that I gleaned from this insight was something about this wideness that encompasses the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. The very breadth of the tradition led me to consider the relativity of in-sights coming from a myriad of intellectual pursuits and sources that inform and form us. These sources all speak about human identity, and are often held in tension in the same way that the world and society are experienced in tension—a cre...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Living Conversations [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Living Conversations BY MICHAEL HIMES Higher Education in a Catholic Context On one of the many occasions when he was asked why he had become a Catholic, Chesterton replied that he became Catholic because Catholicism is a community with a deep and rich sense of tradition. And, he said, belonging to a community with such a sense of tradition is extremely important because only then can one be freed from the most degrading of all forms of servitude—of being merely a child of one's time. That is, I think, immensely wise. Being part of a tradition means that you do not have to speak with North Americans alone; you can speak with South Americans and Africans and Europeans and Asians and Australians. It also means that you are not confined to speaking only with late twentieth-century people; you can converse with Plato and Emily Dickinson and Mozart and Teresa of Avila. You can speak with Dante and Madame Curie, with Newton and Euclid and Jane Austen. You can talk with all sorts of people...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

What Is the Catholic Intellectual Tradition? BY FRED LAWRENCE A tits best, Rome (taken symbolically) epitomized the vision of the Catholic Intellectual Tradition by its reception of both Jerusalem (seat of Abrahamic religion) and Athens (seat of philosophy and science). This creative receptivity entails living out of the tension between reason and faith with intellectual honesty. This is exemplified in Thomas Aquinas' respect for heretics and adversaries because they help us to discover truth we have not yet understood; and in Ignatius Loyola's insistence "that every good Christian ought to be more willing to give a good interpretation to the statement of another than to condemn it as false." Alongside the two greatest works on education—Plato's Republic and Rousseau's Eviile —stands Augustine's De Doctrina Christians, which warns that the Bible is not a book of science and encourages Christians to learn all they can about nature in order to understand it. Further, the medieval dist...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The End of Education [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

The End of Education ALAS DAI R MACINTYRE The Fragmentation of the American University What should be the distinctive calling of the American Catholic university or college here and now? It should be to challenge its secular counterparts by recovering both for them and for itself a less fragmented conception of what an education beyond high school should be, by identifying what has gone badly wrong with even the best of secular universities. From a Catholic point of view, the contemporary secular university is not at fault because it is not Catholic. It is at fault insofar as it is not a university. Yet the major Catholic universities seem unlikely to accept this calling, if only because their administrative leaders are for the most part hell-bent on imitating their prestigious secular counterparts, which already imitate one another. So we find Notre Dame glancing nervously at Duke, only to catch Duke in the act of glancing nervously at Princeton. What is it that makes this attitude...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Contributing Publications [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Contributing Publications America, the national Catholic weekly magazine, has been published since 1909 by Jesuits in the United States for thinking Catholics and those who want to know what Catholics are thinking. America is online at www.americamagazine.org. Subscribe via the Web site or call 1-800-627-9533. Established in 1924, Commonweal is an independent journal of opinion edited by lay Catholics. It has a special interest in religion (Catholic and otherwise), politics, war and peace issues, and culture. Along with articles on current events, it regularly reviews books, plays, films, and television. It is published 22 times per year. Its goal is "to bring a distinctively Catholic perspective to bear on the issues of the day." A trial subscription is $25. To subscribe, visit www.commonwealmagazine.org. Conversations on Jesuit Higher Education is published by the National Seminar on Jesuit Higher Education, which is jointly sponsored by the Jesuit Conference Board and the Board o...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 16 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007
Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 16 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

Learn all about the new C2l book series at: www.bc.edu/church2l

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Holy See and the Challenges of Catholic Higher Education in the United States [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

The Holy See and the Challenges of Catholic Higher Education in the United States BY + J. MICHAEL MILLER, CSB When they are true to the mission expected of them, Catholic universities propose a particular vision that animates their intellectual life and engages their scholars in a common project. Such a vision is all embracing, since it entails a distinctively Catholic way of apprehending reality that inspires a university's teaching, scholarship, and service. A Catholic university lives from, breathes, and seeks to transmit—through its curriculum, research, and professors — a Weltanschauung grounded in a great tradition. This means more than a presentation of the Catholic intellectual tradition in the university's curriculum and lip service to that tradition in the faculty's scholarly activities. A Catholic vision can be relished, deepened, and communicated only by giving it more than equal time in a marketplace of competing opinions. One could expect as much—though this does not, ...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A Vocation for Catholic Higher Education? [Newspaper Article] — C21 Resources — 1 January 2007

A Vocation for Catholic Higher Education? BY STEPHEN POPE Tuition, room, and board for many Catholic universities runs on average between $40,000 and $45,000 per year. The cost of tuition continues to rise faster than both income and inflation. Add transportation, books, fees, and other miscellaneous expenses, and the total cost of a four-year bachelor's degree often tops the $lBO,OOO mark at the most prestigious schools. About 60 percent of students at all private fouryear institutions receive some form of financial aid, and about half of all students are forced to borrow to meet expenses. The steep debt incurred over the course of four years typically requires many times that number of years of repayment. Given this expense, many fear that in the years to come only the most affluent may be able to afford a Catholic college education. This cost should be placed in the context of the growing income inequality between the rich and poor in our society. On June 19, 1996, the United Sta...

Publication Title: C21 Resources
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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