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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 Ozark Dreams And Mountain Memories Editor's Note: This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. If you could imagine how you would feel if you did calisthenics for ten or twelve hours out in the hot August sun, you'd know how we felt at the end of the first day picking cotton. At first our sore muscles and aching backs cried out from over exhaustion and fatigue. And when we'd straighten up from picking to carry a heavy sack of cotton to the scales, there'd be sickness in the stomach, a dizziness in the head and blurred vision of the endless fields of cotton simmering in heat waves that looked like a hot steamy ocean. But gradually our muscles tightened up and we became more or less immune to pain and could and did pick more cotton than any other family i...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

Coming Home Continued From Page 9. around in the area. My father loved those mountains and he loved to hunt. He hunted coons and bob cats with his dogs. He was said to have the best beagles and finest coon dogs in the area. Even after he left the mountains to be nearer home and his work, he still hunted possum with his dogs as fellow sportsmen joined him. I went with him one time, and I can truthfully say - that was my first and last time. After that, I left the hunting to the men folk. My father used to sit around the fire at night telling us about things that happened when he was a boy, and of his many trips to the mountains. He told us about his father fighting in the Civil War, and after several years fighting, came home, and his own family didn't even know him. He looked that bad. My father was born a year after his father came home from the war. His family was very well-to-do, most of them very sedate in nature. His father was very strict with the children. My father went to t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 The Mail Box Dear Mountain Laurel I am a subscriber to your great paper. However, I have not received a paper for quite some time. Have I missed sending in a subscription? I have not heard anything concerning it Please let me know about my subscription. I want to keep getting the paper. Thank you, Joyce Denton Statesville, North Carolina Dear Ms. Denton & other Readers: We lost our lease in March and were forced to relocate. This upset our printing schedule and was a major financial setback for the Foundation. Naively we thought the printing schedule could be reestablished without this much delay, however, it has taken much more time then even we anticipated. Our limited funds prevented us from notifying subscribers of the reasons for the delay (to send each subscriber a post card would have cost over $1,000.00). During this time period we have personally had other setbacks which have thrown our time schedule off course even more. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

GENEALOGY I need information on William Ward who married Rosa Payne. Rosa, I was told, was half Cherokee Indian. Several children were born to this union: Eck Ward, Jack Ward (Jack moved to W. Va., had one daughter, Britt Green Ward who lived on Sandy Ridge, Va.), Robert Lee Ward lived in Jurricane section of Wise County, Va., Virginia Ward married William N. Richardson and they lived in the Sandy Ridge Section of Coebum, Va. (they had two daughters: Lora Deal, Clinchco, Va. and Eston Evans, Herald, Va; six sons: B.C. Richardson, Kingsport, Tn., Dallas Richardson, Oak Ridge, Tn., Orville Richardson, Lancaster, Pa., Ralph Richardson, Chicago, 11., Guy Richardson, Monroe, Mi., and Russell Richardson, Huron, Oh.), Alice Ward married Charlie Smith. Mary Jane Ward was my grandmother. She married Henry Dobson Bates from Snow Hill, (Dobson, N.C.) January 24,1892 at Lambsburg, Va. She **d. Subscribe Today W Jgaurel or J^aurel Send a Friend a Gift Subscribes: The Mountain Laurel With each su...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 Lewis Mountain is centrally located in the Shenandoah National Park. Rockingham and Green County divide is east and west along the crest of the mountain. A road near Bear Fence Mountain divide it north and south. This park fire road going east is called Slaughter Road, going west the same road runs parallel with Naked Creek to Route 340 and is called Naked Creek Road. Near the foot of the mountain along Naked Creek is a village of about 200 people called Jollett Hollow. A fine gentleman named Van Taylor who had the honor of being Justice of the Peace for a long time lived here and owned a mule named Queenie. The tannery at Elkton, Virginia had been destroyed by a disastrous fire, bark hauling from the mountains had come to an end, sawmilling was slow and there was little work for Queenie the mule. In the Jollett area grass land was scarce and Mr. Taylor took the liberty to let Queenie graze along the roads of the community. This went on for so...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

Aunt Katherine By: Ivalien Hylton Belcher© 1989 All through my fifty-plus years there is a lovely lady in our Blue Ridge that has had a great influence in my life, Katherine Hall Boyd. She is my aunt and the older sister that I never had. Aunt Katherine was born in "the Dark Hollow", located in the Mountain View Community down in the hollow from Conner's View Primitive Baptist Church [a section of Meadows of Dan, Patrick County, Virginia]. A portion of the old house is still there. Her parents were Nannie Wood Hall and Herman Clyde Hall. Now as Aunt Katherine relates some of her childhood memories, you can see how she clings to some of the old timey customs and beliefs: "As I think back to my childhood days, several things come to mind. One of the things I enjoyed as a child was building play houses with my cousin and playing in them for hours. I was an expert at making mud pies. Wonder why mud pies are more fun real ones?" "Times were hard back then and we didn't have the things th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 The key to Grandpa's attic dangled on a nail so high over the door frame that neither I nor my step grandmother could reach it. Beyond the door, Grandpa preserved the treasures which belonged to my Grandma. This mausoleum was my only contact with Grandma because she died before I was born. Grandpa never talked about Grandma much, I guess out of courtesy for my step Grandmother. But when Grandpa and I clambered the steps to the attic, and the door was wedged tightly below, Grandpa talked about his "Laurie". Grandpa had finished a small portion of the attic. He built sturdy shelves around the walls and painted everything white. There was window in the room at the top of the stairs, and it faced east, allowing the afternoon sunlight to glide off the floor, leaving circles of light on everything it touched. As I mounted each step, an image of Grandma's spinning wheel slowly emerged. It silently peered down the steps, watching for intruders. A deli...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

There was a time, before World War 11, when most folks in Carroll County, Virginia were born, lived and died on the same piece of ground. Our log cabins, churches, pastures, hay fields and yes, even the cemeteries, were personal and precious. This changed in 1941 when my brother and countless other farm boys and girls left their homes to defend the land that their ancestors had watered for generations with sweat and tears. The young people who fought for their homes during that War to end all wars, like their forefathers in the Civil War, were inspired by more than strategic battlefield targets. They fought bloody and passionate battles for their homes and land where losing meant more than the loss of some foreign hillside. They fought and many died for run-down shacks and cabins on worn out land. They defended their friends, families and homes with honor and all who came back to the mountains were changed forever. Like my brother Harold, some returned and stayed on the farm for a t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER 1989 Old Time Soda Biscuits 2 cups flour 1 cup thick sour milk 1/2 teaspoon soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons lard Sift together soda, flour and salt. Work the lard into this until the mixture looks like meal. Add milk gradually and mix with a knife to a rather soft dough. Turn on to lightly floured board and knead until the dough feels smooth and velvety. Roll and cut. Put in a pan and bake in hot oven. Serve piping hot. Graham Cracker Cake 1/2 pound butter 1 pound box Graham Crackers, crushed 2 cups sugar 5 eggs 1 cup sweet milk 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup grated coconut Cream butter and sugar, add eggs, one at a time. Add baking powder to crumbs. Add milk and coconut. Mix well. Bake in 3 pans 350 degrees, 25 to 30 minutes. Spread can crushed pineapple between layers. Lima Bean Sausage Skillet 1/4 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup diced celery 2 tablespoons fat 1 cup canned tomatoes 2 cups cooked or canned limas 1/2 pound sausage Coon onion and cel...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

BACKROAD Continued From Page 24. The building we leased is a two story cinder block structure with office space downstairs and a six room apartment upstairs. Believe it or not, this is the first time in six years that The Mountain Laurel has not shared our bedrooms. Before moving here the limited space available in our home/office required that computers and files be distributed to every unused nook and cranny. Now the office is completely separate from living quarters. That might not sound like much to the casual observer, but to anyone who has ever tried to go to sleep with a printer printing 10,000 mailing labels at the foot of their bed, believe me, it means a lot. From our new location, just two blocks off Main Street, we have discovered the genuine pleasures of living in a small town. A favorite of mine is a nightly walk around the block about 11:00 pm. Leaving our office/apartment at 220 South Ist Street, we walk away from town on Ist Street to Franklin Street, turn right and...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER; 1989 BACKROAD Continued From Page 19. 2JI (0.1) Here we cross a bridge over Reed Creek. Looking back to our right we can see the old bridge and get a picturesque glance of the mill through the trees. After crossing the bridge, there is an intersection. We will proceed straight ahead on state road 696. 3.7 (1.0) As a point of reference, on our left is the drive leading to the American Legion Post. 4.0 (0.3) In the hollow on our right, in the woods, we can see a small but very pretty pond. 4.4 (0.4) From here we have a beautiful view of Sand Mountain to our left. Directly behind us, as the road climbs higher, there is a panoramic view of the Town of Wytheville. 4.6 (0.2) From here, on our right, we overlook a small mountain farm and the entire town of Wytheville in the valley below. We are afforded a picturesque view of the town with its water tower, church steeples and rooftops peeking above the trees. 4.8 (0.2) Here, on our right, is a small mounta...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

BACKROAD Continued From Page 20. 18.6 (0.1) At this stop light we are at the intersection of Main Street, which is also Routes 11 and 21. Here we will turn left onto Main Street. 18.7 (0.1) On our right is the First Christian Church of Wytheville, built in 1869. Beyond it is a beautiful huge old red brick home. Beyond it, on our right is a beautiful old home which is now the law office of State Senator Danny Bird. 18.8 (0.1) On our left is the Manor House Restaurant and to our right is the Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. Holy Trinity was built in 1877 and has a 100 foot steeple. We are now proceeding up Main Street of Wytheville. 19.1 (0.3) On our right is the US Post Office. Just beyond the Post Office and on our right is the Farron Smith School of Dance. This building was the birthplace of Edith Boiling, who later married Woodrow Wilson, the 28th president of the United States. She was also a direct descendant of the Indian Princess Pocahontas. Just beyond it is the intersection of ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER; 1989 BACKROAD Continued From Page 21. 24.2 (0.1) Here State road 758 turns right to Wytheville KOA Campground. This is an excellent facility with swimming, hiking and other outdoor activities and camping cabins. It is owiled and operated by Donna and Gene Metzger. 27.3 (3.1) At this stop sign we will proceed directly ahead, continuing to follow the Service Road that parallels 1-81. (Stop lights are in the process of being installed here so when you come by it might be "stop light" rather than "stop sign".) 27.4 (0.1) After crossing the intersection, the Petro Truck Stop and Iron Skillet Restaurant is on our right 1-81 and 1-77 continues to run parallel to our left. 28.5 (1.1) Here we turn right into the entrance of the Factory Merchants Outlets of Fort Chiswell. This is a new facility and a shopper's delight. The complex will house over 40 factory owned outlet stores when fully occupied in 12 to 18 months. Currently there are 17 factory owned outle...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

BACKROAD Continued From Page 22. of the lead mines during the Revolution. These mill stones were used in the old Fort Chiswell Mill." Erected by the Stuart Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, Wytheville, Virginia 1924. Editor's Note: (Watchfor more information about the McGavock family and Fort Chiswell in upcoming issues in the series, THE BORDER, which begins in this issue of The Mountain Laurel.) 30.7 (1.2) At this stop sign we will turn right, onto Highway 52. As we turn we will position ourselves in the left lane. 30.8 (0.1) After we have crossed the bridge over I--81 and 1-77, the entrance ramp to 1-81 and 1-77 turns left. We do not. We will continue straight ahead to the next possible left turn onto the Frontage Road. As we turn the Citgo Service Station will be to our right and 1-81 and 1-77 will be on our left. 31.9 (1.1) On our right is the entrance to Snoopers Antique Mall. It has over a hundred different shops in one building. While it is called an antique mall...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

" The Heart of the Blue Rid S e " JLaureZ Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life PAGE 24 are hidden away on mountain backroads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our B ACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite places with you each month. HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis 0 indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. 'l/ O BACKROADS "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1989

The time of the year is approaching; brisk chilly mornings, leaves turning; the promise of frost in the air - which brings back to me memories of the time each year when we made apple butter on the farm some fifty-five to seventy years ago. This was as much a social gathering as the work it took to prepare the apples for the apple butter kettle the following morning. Mother would get on that old crank turned telephone hanging on the wall and call neighbors and relatives to bring a sharp knife and come to an "apple peeling". This was a common occurrence in many homes in the mountain community where people helped each other with various and sundry jobs. After an early supper, people would begin arriving, men and women alike, and congregate in the kitchen and on the back porch where sacks of apples and a large wash tub was stashed. The younger children and those old enough for school were allowed to stay up a while, but went to bed early and reluctantly, amid the laughing and talking g...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1989

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1989 Culture Shock By: Jennifer Rose © At only thirty-two, I'm a throwback to another culture. My son and his friends listen with wideeyed fascination to tales of ancient days. "How did you take a bath without a bathroom?" one fastidious little girl wants to know. I explain that we heated water on a heavy iron cookstove. Each person got a bucket of hot water to pour in the big zinc tub, then added fresh well water until the temperature was just right. We bathed in the kitchen because it was the warmest room in the house. After bathing we emptied the tub outside, cleaned it and, after everyone had a turn in it, hung it on the back porch by the smokehouse. "What's a smokehouse?" is the question. I tell where meat really comes from. The kids will eat more vegetables for a while after that. It's one method of pediatric diet management. Next, "What TV shows did you watch?" Everybody' s ears perk up. Remember the commercial where the line is, "My broker is ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1989

Ozark Dreams And Mountain Memories Editor's Note: This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's as seen through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. We picked cotton about three weeks before school started. That three weeks working with and listening to those high school kids convinced me that they were super intelligent creatures and that me and my whole family was hopeless ignorant, and unable to cope with the likes of them. They talked about things I had never heard about such as, sociology and gym classes, proms and formals, dating and picture shows and driving their parent's cars. They sang gay, silly songs and chanted football cheers and teased and chased each other. Byron sometimes weighed the cotton and they would tease him and they called him Barney Google or Mr. Byron Langley the third. They'd put cotton boles down his shirt co...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1989

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1989 The Last Visit By: James Manley© i9«9 The other day I drove out to see the family house. It's a crumbling brick facade now, a dark red, two-story building stooped and sagging in the center of a weed-cluttered lot. Most people probably view it as an eyesore on the landscape, but I see a tried and true friend when I visit that grand old house. During my school years I owned a part of it, a lofty upstairs room I joyous shared with large wall posters of Johnny Mack Brown and The Durango Kid, and later, glamour beauties Jane Russell and Brigitte Bardot. It wasn't the neatest room in the house, thanks to my collection of rocks, glassed spiders, wall banners, comic books, records, miniature space rockets, baseball paraphernalia, and miscellaneous doo-dads of monumental importance, but in was easily the most comfortably place in all the universe. A room of similiar size belonged to my sister, who made it her life's work to never let me forget she was two...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1989

George L. Carter - Mountain Capitalist In the late 1800's and early 1900's the development of the natural resources in southwestern Virginia, eastern Tennessee, southern West Virginia, and eastern Kentucky led to the rise of complex business empires. Many men, mostly from outside the Appalachian region became famous as entrepreneurs, coal barons, and railroad builders. However, one man who built such an empire and who, more than any other man, brought industrial development to these areas, is today virtually unknown even in the very places he once owned and developed. Not an "outsider" but a man who was born and reared in southwestern Virginia, his business career lasted more than fifty years and generated millions of dollars and thousands of jobs. George Lafayette Carter was born January 10, 1857 near the town of Hillsville in Carroll County, Virginia. He was the oldest of nine children of Walter Crockett and Lucy Ann Jennings Carter. George L. (as Mr. Carter was known) grew up und...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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