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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

June 1999 Value products fit niche (Continued from page 6) for crackers, honey products, unique flavors for sausage and field corn that becomes tortilla chips. Here are other examples: The Hayman Sweet Potato is popular on Virginia's Eastern Shore. The Virginia Eastern Shore Corporation has found that it's not necessary to discard sweet potatoes that "are not completely suitable" for the fresh market, said Bill Mapp, Southeastern regional marketing manager for VDACS. Recently, the company began making potato chips out of them. "They're taking a product that had only a certain value as it came out of the ground and turning it into product with more value," Mapp said. j~, mE&s&iSKM mmW, mE9t** IBI^BSHi . . . ■ M It .Sfv -. -j. 'i Jtti rr *» *V •> t , * I "V^£f f \ *?=•'T* ■ » 1 \ |l ,/*" * A ■ * » " / . - •:!»> Bii m MBBH^i?*Tjr i -■ s. r .■v 1 ' .«y~/-- ;-* ■ • " . ~^^^B\]j.J^jr7n^^iP|!jßtßrrFgrf'". |"V _ ) Sh^^v P AEM SI *(y fp^fjßPSEgfi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

Farm Bureau News YF contest taking entries "Races are not won by the fastest athletes. Fights are not won by the strongest men. But the races are won and the fights are won by those who want to win most of all." That statement from former Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda can apply to the Young Farmer of the Year competition now under way. When we won the statewide contest several years ago, we weren't the strongest, fastest or most successful young farmers in Virginia. But we believed in ourselves and what we had accomplished as young farmers. We put a lot of determined effort into our application for the contest and the quality of the application itself counts 10 percent with the judges. Farm Bureau leadership counts 20 percent, and other types of leadership count 15 percent. County Farm Bureaus have until June 15 to select a contestant. The county Young Farmer committee uses impartial judges for determining a county winner. That winner goes on to district competition, and...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

June 1999 * Growing flowers in tobacco greenhouses? BLACKSTONE—Is it possible to replace some tobacco plants in greenhouses with fresh cut flowers? That's a possibility that several Virginia agriculture officials are exploring, said james Jones, director of the Southern Piedmont Agriculture Research and Extension Center here. To maintain tobacco price stability at the farm gate, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has told growers they can't produce as much tobacco. In fact, the government reduced quotas for flue-cured tobacco by 18 percent in 1998 and by I 7 percent for the I 999 season. Many Virginia growers start their plants in flat trays in greenhouses in March and transplant the plants to fields in May, Jones said. A greenhouse, which can cost $30,000 to build, is the length of a football field and 30 feet wide. Pesticide ban would cripple farmers, increase imports A U.S. ban of two pesticide groups would bolster foreign food producers while hurting America's consumers and farm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

Farm Bureau News dassified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. We are not responsible for typographical errors or errors due to illegible handwriting. Classified ads carried in the Farm Bureau News do not constitute an endorsement by Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. We also reserve the right to edit or reject ads. including ads that represent a business in competition with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation or Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Companies. I Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond. VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

June 1999 The Farmers Market (Continued from page 10) excellent condition. $2,500 080. 804-283-5802. 1969 C-60 CHEVROLET BUS - Converted to motorhome. White with red trim, awning on side, kitchen, sink, small refrigerator. generator, sleeps 5 to 7 people, very nice. 540-483-7058. FOR SALE-Cruising boat. 1979 Steury-2500. $5,900 080. 804-333-0027. Warsaw. VA. 1985 FORD - FBOOO 14 - dump. 3208 cat remanufactured engine. swivel pintle trailer hookup $ 15,500. 804-842-5322. EQUIPMENT TRAILER - 10 ton rated, dual axle, electric brakes, 24' deck, dove tail $3,200. 540-967-3509. GOLF CARTS - Electric and gas. 804-946-2008 or 804-946-7818. 2-GI - Single axle trailers with spare tire wheel, _ ton used $425 each. Call lack 804-575-7905. 1988 CRUISE AIR II - 36,000 miles, 1990 ranger 70.000 miles $30.000. TVade for pickup. 804-392-5991. NEW HEAVY DUTY - 15 xß' steel flat truck bed. Built for army 2-1/2 ton truck. $1.100. 540-382-8830. 1983 FORD F-100- Good condition $2,500. 757-442-7706. 1967 ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

HH9HHVRVtI What is the advantage of buying your Health I nsurance through the Virginia Farm Bureau? ADVANTAGE #1 The Best Value for your $ You can save money and receive better coverage. "I saved our organization $2700.00 per year in premiums while offering our staff better group coverage." E.C.B. Rocky Mount, Va. j "We are just tickled with our new health coverage and are saving over $3000.00 a year in premiums." Mr. and Mrs. D.T., Lawrenceville, VA. With over 30 plans, you choose the plan that fits your budget... and your needs. ADVANTAGE #2 Personal Service Over 100 Farm Bureau Offices to provide you convenient, and personal attention for your Claims processing or coverage questions ADVANTAGE #3 Comprehensive Insurance Programs i Mf If you are under 65 — Individual and Group Plans ®m&L---HE If you are over 65 — Medicare Supplement and Long Term Care plans ■> v If you are a small businessman — coverage for 2-90 employees. The Farm Bureau also offers Dental, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

hhhmt Visit our Web site at www vufb.com Farm Bureau News Volume 58, Number 6 EPA ban could cut farm income by one-third By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist To a businessman, cutting your profit by as much as one-third could be devastating. Yet some farmers face that and worse if the Environmental Protection Agency bans organophosphates and carbamates—two insecticide groups widely used by vegetable, fruit and grain producers. If the EPA bans the 30 crop protectants on its current hit list, the impact on southern farmers "would be severe," according to a recent study commissioned by the American Farm Bureau Federation. Apple producers are expected to face a 38 percent yield reduction if these chemicals are banned. And Virginia peanut growers could see yields fall by 1 7 percent, and production costs rise by 15 percent. "It could cripple our operation," said Dudley Rinker, a Frederick County apple orchardist. Rinker grows 150 acres of apples and uses three of the pesticides ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News Insects can wipe out crops lacking protection (Continued from page 1) producer in the South. "This would destroy Virginia agriculture as we know it," said Tony Banks, assistant director of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Commodity/Marketing Department. "Banning these pesticides would hurt peanut, cotton, corn, wheat, apple, tomato, alfalfa, potato, grape, broccoli and tobacco growers." In addition, a ban of these insecticides would increase the amount of imported foods, which are grown with chemicals already banned in the United States, according to the study. As a result, there would actually be less U.S. control over the use of organophosphates and carbamates than if their use were not banned domestically, the study said. "We would be stripping our farmers of the tools they need to produce an abundant, affordable supply of healthy food, while at the same time turning over production of those foods to foreign farmers, who would still have access to those tools,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

July 1999 Farming is still a family affair in Virginia What do you get when you mix a global economy, the whims of Mother Nature and government misunderstanding together? An entirely new kind of family farm in Virginia. As a result of the volatile mix, today's family farm is larger, more efficient, more environmental- ly friendly and more automated than farms of the past. Farming is no longer the romantic Currier and Ives image some would like it to be. Anyone still farming in this manner—with a few cows, a few chickens and a small plot of corn—is doing it as a hobby or is also working off the farm to make a living. Larger means survival in Virginia. Some critics refer to these family farms as "factory" farms. But more than 98 percent of farms in Virginia are still family-owned, family-occupied, family-operated and family-responsible. But they had to get bigger or get out. Technological advances are allowing families to operate farms with perhaps 5,000 hogs or 15,000 turkeys in a cl...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News Insurance fraud grows into big economic crime (Continued from page 1) injuries from staged wrecks. The annual cost of insurance fraud in America is more than $85 million per year and growing, according to a report by CAIF. "The amount is a hidden tax of more than $1,000 per family each year on the costs of goods and services," CAIF reported. A car owner involved in a "fender bender" might inflate the claim to cover the policy deductible or the cost of insurance premiums. A study of injury claims from auto accidents in Massachusetts found that 48 percent have some aspect of fraud or abuse, CAIF reported. A study by the Rand Institute for Civil justice concluded more than 35 percent of people hurt in auto accidents exaggerate their injuries, adding $13 billion to $18 billion to the nation's annual insurance bill, CAIF reported. While you may be paying an extra $200 a year to cover insurance fraud, you can help reduce that extra cost. Simply pick up the phone and call ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

July 1999 Dry weather sparking more forest fires MINERAL —Virginia has already lost more acreage to forest fires in 1999 than all of last year. As of June 2, 1,165 forest fires had burned 11,059 acres throughout the state. Most of those fires, 1,119, blazed through state and private land, scorching 6,005 acres. Nine fires consumed 4,228 acres in Virginia's national parks and 36 fires charred 826 acres on U.S. Forest Service property. "Whenever I see a plume of smoke in the sky I always get nervous," said H.H. Walton, Jr., president of Walton Lumber Company in Louisa County, which maintains about 9,000 acres of forestland in Central Virginia. A forest fire blackened about 60 acres on one of the company's pine plantations in early May. ... 40% of people in Virginia over 65 will enter a nursing home facility* ... their stay will cost them between $75,000 to $125,000** For Many Virginians Their Nursing Home Stay Could Wipe Out Their Personal Assets And Their Retirement Savings! Don't be...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News Future is looking bright for state's aquaculture By MELODIE N. MARTIN Special to the Farm Bureau News RICHMOND — Seafood lovers may find that "fresh from the farm" applies to their favorite fish as well as the vegetable side dish. When it comes to raising seafood for fun and profit, Virginia may soon be more than just another fish in the sea. The state has all the makings of becoming a reliable source for aquacultural products. "It seems there is a huge potential for aquaculture to provide seafood," said Spencer Neale Jr., assistant director of commodity/marketing with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Increased demand is due to a diminishing wild harvest and the growing popularity of seafood as part of a healthy diet, he said. The average American eats about 14.6 pounds of seafood each year, according to the National Fisheries Institute. Retail stores and restaurants sell more than $46 billion worth of fish and shellfish each year. The infrastructure for Virgini...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

July 1999 Low prices to persist into 2000 RICHMOND—Farmers can expect continued low prices for their commodities during the next year, but consumers shouldn't expect those low prices to be reflected at the grocery store. According to a new forecast from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, producers of wheat, rice, soybeans and corn will get little marketplace relief in 1999-2000. "In Virginia, I think we'll see lower soybean and corn prices for farmers," said David Coleman, grain manager for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "No one benefits when that happens. "Farmers have to struggle to make a living, and consumers don't see a drop in prices because retailers don't base their prices on what farmers get paid." For example, breakfast cereal manufacturers said their prices will increase 2.5 percent to 3 percent, although wheat prices are at record lows. Retailers don't tend to lower their prices when the raw commodity prices fall apart. j mm Hi k > - s." Ske wants to ke...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News —T - §f$ Operating zoo is like farming, owner says By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist CHESTERFIELD—Baby chimpanzees dressed in diapers suckle formula from baby bottles, as a rare vhite Bengal tiger struts around the perimeters of its cage nearby. Jim Andelin wanders around, calling his children and employees on the walkie-talkie, doling out chores for the afternoon. More than 400 animals need to be fed and watered. Living areas need to be cleaned out. It's just a typical day for Andelin, who owns the Metro Richmond Zoo. Andelin said the business venture is teaching his seven children the same lessons he learned growing up on a farm in Washington state. "I learned the value of hard work and responsibility living on my family's farm and working on farms during summers when I was in high | "** gnr — - k M., Y mKk. * *^- f oHI Bi mL-" - \ • ui F1 I Ik W, I W school," said Andelin, who is a Chesterfield Farm Bureau member. "I wanted my kids to have the same so...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

July 1999 Giraffes eat from hands (Continued from page 8) and feed the animals." Visitors can buy special feed pellets to give the animals, but their real food adds up to about 600 pounds a day. Andelin buys hay and grain from Virginia farmers, but the majority of the meat comes from out of state. As the day winds down, 14-year-old Jana heads off to feed the tapirs, llamas, kangaroos, emus and ostriches, and 11-year-old Justin goes to feed the ducks, swans and other set of ostriches. "I can't think of a more rewarding job," Andelin says enthusiastically. "Just like farming, I'm able to work at something I love to do, with my family by my side." Dry weather delays harvest and planting of crops By ERIC MILLER and JOHNNA MILLER Crop fields that normally stretch out to the horizon with rows of crops were still sitting empty and idle in mid-June. Dry weather forced farmers in parts of Virginia to postpone planting their soybeans until it rains, said Jim Belote, Accomack County's Extensio...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News Farmers not getting fair share By MELODIE N. MARTIN Special to the Farm Bureau News FREDERICKSBURG—Some shoppers across the state earned a little extra cash while learning a lesson about American farmers. The annual Farmers' Share program educates consumers about the surprisingly small amount of money farmers receive for what they produce. This year members of Virginia Farm Bureau Federation state and local women's committees set up information booths at Food Lion grocery stores in Big Stone Gap, Charlottesville, Danville, Fredericksburg, Manassas, Newport News and Hillsville on June 9. "The actual one-to-one talk tends to get the message across," said Kay Shirley, state women's committee eastern district chairman. To illustrate the point, Farm Bureau volunteers chose grocery shoppers at random and offered to pay the "farmers' share" of their grocery bill, excluding alcohol and other non-food items. It sounds like a good deal, but when the bill is tallied up, the sh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

July 1999 Author asks if agriculture is terminally ill By CHRISTY McKAY Special to the Farm Bureau News The end of U.S. agriculture—a grim prediction or a thought-pro-voking discussion? The latest book by Steven C. Blank, "The End of Agriculture in the American Portfolio," predicts an inevitable end for farm production in America and tries to develop discussions to produce solutions. In 232 pages, it states the economics of agriculture, the plight of farmers and ends by discussing alternatives. The book retails for $59.95. The fruit of four years' work, Blank said in a telephone interview, the book was written to make people wake up. It talks to both ag and non-ag worlds without the dry, boring economic style of similar books. Since its publication in early 1998, interest in the book has increased. "I don't think we'll see the end of ag in my lifetime, but I don't know about my daughter's or grandkids' lifetime," Blank said. Legislation may hurt farmers Government policies designed ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News Rural roads less safe than interstate highways RICHMOND—RuraI roads are an accident waiting to happen. The death rate on rural, twolane roads is three times that of the death rate on interstates, according to 1997 figures from the Roadway Safety Foundation. "We do get a significant amount of automobile claims from rural road accidents," said Rick Mattox, claims director and acting executive vice president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Companies. "On those narrow, curvy roads, visibility is so limited—and there's barely enough room to begin with—that it doesn't take much for an accident to happen." According to the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles, car crashes in rural areas are on the rise. And the crashes in the country seem to be more serious. For example, according to 1997 DMV figures, Charlottesville had 1,184 car crashes, but only one fatality. In comparison, surrounding Albemarle County reported 1,775 crashes and II fatalities. In Danville,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

July 1999 Diet can lower your blood pressure High blood pressure is often called the silent killer. That's because most people who have high blood pressure don't feel sick. High blood pressure contributes to heart disease, which is the No. I killer in the United States. What can be done about this health problem? A recent study called "Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension" or "D.A.S.H." showed that a particular eating plan could actually lower high blood pressure. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the "DASH" plan may even eliminate the need for medicine in some patients. New air scrubber removes odors in hog buildings By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor ST. LOUIS, MO—An engineering design firm is selling a machine that will remove 80 percent of the odor emitted by a hog confinement building. Based in St. Louis, lnnoventor Engineering, Inc. began testing its "Air Scrubber" in June 1997 and found that the system works well, according to a brochure distributed by ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1999

Farm Bureau News Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. We are not responsible for typographical errors or errors due to illegible handwriting. Classified ads carried in the Farm Bureau News do not constitute an endorsement by Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. We also reserve the right to edit or reject ads, including ads that represent a business in competition with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation or Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Companies. > Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cv...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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