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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MEDICAL SPOONFULS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

MEDICAL SPOONFULS.   —♦—       It has long been recognised that the reputed capacity of spoons in domestic use cannot be depended on for medicinal use when accurate dosage is required. From tests reported in the "Lancet," it appears that teaspoons may vary in capacity from 75 to 130 minims. Inas- much as the teaspoon is supposed to hold 60 minims, this variation is considerable, and might lead to serious consequences. Of dessert- spoons examined, two contained three fluid drachms, and a third nearly four fluid drachms, in like manner tablespoons vary in capacity from four to six fluid drachms. Dessertspoons should, of course, hold two fluid drachms, and tablespoons four fluid drachms. Hence these domestic spoons are totally untrustworthy for medicinal use. Since in actual practice few persons fill spoons perfectly full with medicinal liquids, but only approximately so, it follows that by the use of the average teaspoon (con- tainin...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The First Federal Contingent. SAILING OF THE CUSTODIAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

The First Federal Contingent. SAILING OF THE CUSTODIAN. THE CUSTODIAN STEAMING DOWN SYDNEY HARBOR. No crowds, no bands, no cheering nor shout- ing—only a little sobbing of relatives and dear friends. Practically unheralded, except by the daily newspapers, the First New South Wales Federal Contingent slipped quietly away the other morn- ing, and was quickly swallowed up in distance. The Custodian, with her number but indis- tinctly visible from the shore, ran down the har- bor and out to sea. These scenes do not attract the crowds of two years ago. They have become too matter-of- fact. One of the chief features of the sailing of the Custodian—at any rate, the one by which it will be longest remembered—was the bantering atti- tude assumed by the troops towards Mr. John See, the State Premier, whilst addressing them prior to departure. Their grievance was back-pay. Before Mr. See got as far as a "keen interest in their well- being," he was interrupted by men who had seen service before...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
56 PROPOSALS IN 120 MINUTES. The following is a typical "news-story" from a New York paper:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

56 PROPOSALS IN 120 MINUTES.   —♦—   The following is a typical "news-story" from a New York paper:— Omaha, Neb., Saturday.—Albert Hanson, 22 years old, a farmer, of Avoca, Iowa, is the hero of 56 proposals of marriage and 56 rejections in 120 minutes. Mr. Hanson came to Omaha this morning with the avowed purpose of taking a wife back home with him who would be prettier than his sweet- heart in Avoca, with whom he quarrelled yester- day. He went to the Court-house and asked for a marriage license. When asked the name of the person whom he proposed to marry Mr. Hanson looked surprised, and announced that he did not know; he expected the license clerk to furnish a girl. Mr. Hanson was taken to the County Judge and the matter explained to him. The Judge took the young man around to the different offices, introduced him to each woman in the building, to whom Hanson promptly proposed in these words:— "I have a farm, and my uncle has a saloon, which I will inheri...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INDIANS AND SMALLPOX. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

INDIANS AND SMALLPOX.   An outbreak of smallpox having occurred among the Yuma Indians in Arizona, the In- dians, in accordance with custom, resolved to sacrifice their medicine man in order to appease the Great Spirit who had sent the disease. The medicine man, however, got wind of their intention, and fled into the mountains. He was pursued by a party of Indians and taken into Mexico. There he was bound to a tree, and, after cruel tortures, put to death. Smallpox is steadily increasing in the large cities of the United States.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CONSCIENTIOUS SOLDIER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

A CONSCIENTIOUS SOLDIER. A soldier who saw three years of service with the 9th United States Infantry in the Philippines and China, has returned home "a time-expired man," with several interesting stories of hard fighting in the Far East. One of them concerns General Chaffee, and ex- hibits that officer as the possessor of a grim sense of humor not shared, apparently, by some of his brother officers. The story goes that during that day of terrific fighting before the walls Tien-tsin a private soldier asked his officer where he should take up his position. Receiving no reply, he asked a second time. "Oh, I don't care where you go. Go to h— or San Francisco!" the officer shouted. The soldier saluted and disappeared. He was seen no more by his comrades for three long months, when he returned and was imprisoned as a deserter. At the court-martial he summoned witnesses to prove that he obeyed orders, but was sen- tenced to three months' imprisonment. When the judgment was sent on to Gene...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MARIE CORELLI ON ALIENS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

MARIE CORELLI ON ALIENS. A mass meeting, under the auspices of the Bri- tish Brothers' League, was held recently at the People's Palace, Mile-end, London, for the purpose of protesting against the immigration of pauper aliens. Miss Marie Corelli wrote a long letter, in which she said that "there is, indeed, something grossly unjust in an arrangement which permits useless, incapacitated, or meddlesome sections of humanity, who have been expelled their own countries as undesirable inhabitants, to land on our own shores. "Our first duty is to ourselves, and British homes should be among the first considerations of the British Government." Miss Corelli suggested that committees of the British Brothers' League should be formed in the large provincial towns. In Japan there are apple trees growing about four inches high, which bear fruit about the size of a currant freely.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE IRISH LEADER. A SKETCH OF JOHN REDMOND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

THE IRISH LEADER.   However much we may disapprove of his policy or detest his speeches, there is no ques- tion that John Redmond is one of the dominant men of the moment. Two years ago the Irish Parliamentary party finally determined to become united. On Feb- ruary 5, 1900, John Redmond, Parnellite, was unanimously elected chairman. The Irishmen were not enthusiastic about their choice. Redmond was their chairman, not leader. But he is leader to-day. Events have helped him, but he has himself displayed energy and perseverance little suspected at the time. John Redmond is 50 years old. In figure and face he is the very antithesis of a lean and hun- gry Cato. Rather below medium height, broad in the shoulder, and of ample waist, he has an air of dignity often strangely out of keeping with his printed words. His features are handsome; heavy, but not coarse. He is said to resemble Napoleon in his later days, but it is rather of the senator of Im- perial Rome that he is rem...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"NO NECKTIE PARTY." LILLYWHITE'S OPINION OF HIS TREATMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

"NO NECKTIE PARTY."   —♦—     LILLYWHITE'S OPINION OF HIS   TREATMENT.   Charles Lillywhite, the man brought from Australia as Arthur Blatch, and charged with murder and arson in the name of the latter, has left England for New Zealand. Although the compensation awarded Lilly- white by the British Government was, he says, little more than sufficient to cover his actual pecuniary losses and legal expenses, he was singularly philosophical regarding the whole affair. "Of course I have gone through enough to make some men drop dead," he said to an in- terviewer, "but what am I going to do about it? I am naturally anxious to get away from England, and will soon leave for New Zealand." Lillywhite's sojourn of eight years in the United States was productive of the addition of many Americanisms to his speech. He set forth the skeleton of his story as follows:— "I was taken away from my work, carried more than half-way round th...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICA AND CONSCRIPTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

AMERICA AND CONSCRIPTION. —♦—   For the first time in the history of the United   States Parliament conscription on the lines of   European systems has been advocated in Con-   gress. Senator Hale, in introducing bills on the   National Naval Reserve, declared the reserves   were useless for warfare. Some sort of com-   pulsory military service was necessary, he urg-   ed, and gave support to his contention by in-   stancing the lesson of Great Britain in South Africa.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OFFICERS' WINE PARTY. HORRIBLE DEATH OF THE SON OF A MILLIONAIRE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

OFFICERS' WINE PARTY. HORRIBLE DEATH OF THE SON OF A MILLIONAIRE. A number of officers in the Guards had sat long over their wine after a dinner party among themselves at Potsdam (Germany), five weeks ago, when one of them for a wager drank a tumbler of cognac in ten minutes. Lieut. Streiber, of the Lancers, son of a Thur- ingian millionaire, thought he could go one better by offering to drink a whole bottle of brandy. He accomplished his object, but his comrades had to carry him home, and laid him on a bed. They forgot, however, to unfasten the high and tight-fitting collar of his military coat, and when the natural effects of imbibing such a quantity of alcohol ensued, Lieut. Streiber was literally choked to death. His body was taken to the station with military honors, and a deputation of the officers of his regi- ment were present at the funeral the following day.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CORONATION GUESTS. ENVOYS OF AMERICA, PERSIA, AND GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

CORONATION GUESTS.   —♦—       ENVOYS OF AMERICA, PERSIA, AND   GERMANY.   The names of the special representatives of the crowned heads and of the special ambas- sadors who will attend the Coronation of King Edward are being announced. The German Emperor will be represented by his brother, Prince Henry of Prussia, who is about to visit America in connection with the christening of the Emperor's new yacht. It must be understood that it is contrary to international custom, and the strict etiquette observed at European Courts, for a reigning monarch to attend the coronation of a sove- reign. For this reason the Shah of Persia, who it has been stated would be present, has deputed the Heir-Apparent to the throne to represent him. This is the first time in modern history that the Persian Heir-Apparent has been al- lowed to leave the country. The special ambassador to represent the Unit- ed States will be Mr. Wh...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT HE DID. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

WHAT HE DID. "Do you have mice in your house, Parker?" asked Wicks. "Yes, lots of 'em," said Parker. "What on earth do you do for them? I'm bothered to death by them at my house." "What do I do for 'em?" said Parker. "Why, I do everything for 'em—provide 'em with a home, plenty to eat, and so forth. What more   can they expect?"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SIXTY-TWO DAYS' RIDE THROUGH SNOW. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

SIXTY-TWO DAYS' RIDE THROUGH SNOW. Three officers and five men of the German Chinese expeditionary force have lately accom- plished an interesting and daring long distance ride, from Tientsin through Mongolia to Lake Baikal, says the "United Service Gazette." The whole journey was accomplished in 62 days, after an exceedingly difficult and trying journey. Large snowfields, in which the horses sometimes sank breast-deep, had to be traversed day after day. On one occasion the snow was over 6ft. deep, and the thermometer several degrees below zero, but despite the unfavorable climatic disturbances, the average distance travelled daily was between 30 and 37 miles. The total length of the ride was about 2500 miles, and both riders and horses are reported to have arrived in excellent condition.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROLLER SKATE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

ROLLER SKATE.   —♦— The force expended in pressing downwardly on a skate is ordinarily wasted. Paul Jassman, of Brooklyn, New York City, intends to utilise this downward pressure in a novel skate of his invention, comprising a frame in which front and rear wheels are journaled, and on which       CHAIN-DRIVEN ROLLER SKATE.   guide-posts are supported for the purpose of   receiving a sliding foot-rest. Springs are coiled   around the guide-posts, and hold the foot-rest   in an upper position. A spring-pressed pawl is   secured on the rear of the foot-rest, which pawl,   on the downward movement of the foot-rest, im-   parts movement to a sprocket-chain by which   the rear wheel is driven.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A STORY OF THE LATE QUEEN VICTORIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

A STORY OF THE LATE QUEEN VICTORIA. (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.) LONDON, January 10.—A touching incident   illustrative of the kindness of heart of the late   Queen Victoria was related last Sunday by Dr.   Schofield in his address to 600 of the submerged   tenth who sat down to the annual New Year's   breakfast at Gray's-yard Ragged Mission.   A year ago he said he visited an old woman   of 74, who lived in a small room, the only furni-   ture of which was a broken-down bed, on   which was one ragged coverlet, and a rickety   old table and chair on their last legs.   All her friends, she said, were dead and gone   long ago, all save one, who wouldn't remember   her. Pressed for the name of this friend, the   old woman said in a whisper: "The Queen. Years   ago at Southsea I used to see...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRY THIS TRICK. There is a good deal of fun, but more for the onlookers than for those why try to do it, In the following trick:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

TRY THIS TRICK.   —♦—       There is a good deal of fun, but more for the onlookers than for those why try to do it. In the following trick:— Several persons can take part in this game, and each must assume the position shown in the accompanying picture—namely, he must stand on his right foot, hold his left foot behind his   back with his right hand, and grasp his right ear with his left hand. When all the players are in this position a newspaper or some other object which is about 6in. in height is placed on the ground, and each player is to hop toward it and do his utmost to catch it with his teeth and raise it to his own height. Those who succeed in doing this are hailed as winners, and those who do not succeed have to pay a forfeit. That it is not easy to do this trick any one who tries it for the first time will very quickly dis- cover.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE TABLOID TIME SAVER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

THE TABLOID TIME SAVER. Even more expeditious and more deadly than the quick-lunch counter is the "tabloid restau-   rant" which an ingenious Chicagoan plans to establish. Instead of spending three minutes 37 seconds in gulping a piece of pie and a cup of hot coffee, one can there swallow a "com- pressed beefsteak" or a "protose hash" in only one minute 19 seconds, thus in a single year of 313 working days adding 11 hours 69 minutes 54 seconds to one's business life.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Some Mistake. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

Some Mistake. "Oh, look, auntie, I found this perfectly good cat in the dust-box."   —"Westminster Budget."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IS THE TORPEDO A COWARDLY WEAPON? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

IS THE TORPEDO A COWARDLY WEAPON? "Engineering" says that to them the view that the torpedo is "an unfair and cowardly form of weapon" has always seemed a foolish thing to say. As to cowardice, no form of attack will re- quire more reckless daring than that carried out by means of torpedo craft. Those who man these frail vessels literally carry their lives in their hands; and, even though the vessel may not be hit until she has delivered the fatal blow to her larger antagonist, she is still likely to be anni- hilated herself; for it is not to be supposed that a torpedo-stricken ship will cease firing as soon as she is hit, and it would probably take several minutes for a ship to sink, even though the damage may prove ultimately fatal to her. Those who know the terrible rain of projectiles that can be poured from the quick-firing and machine guns of a war vessel, either battleship or cruiser, will recognise the absurdity of dubbing torpedo warfare as "cowardly." As to being "unfair"—...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT WOULD FOLLOW. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

WHAT WOULD FOLLOW.   "If I should tell you, dear," he said, "that my   love for you had grown cold, that I had ceased to   care for you, and that the happy time when I   shall claim you for my ownest own will never   be, would it really be a trial to you, darling?"   "Yes, George," shyly admitted the girl; "It   would be a breach of promise trial."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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