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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FAST OLD NEW YORK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

FAST OLD NEW YORK. , "So you're back from Now York, Si?" "Yes, an' tired out." "Fast town, eh?" "Fast ain't no namo fer it. I saw banks open all night t' 'commodate tliom as loso their money early in th' evenin', I s'poso; an' lawyers' offices open at three o'clock in th' moi'nin'— t' fix up them as irro in a hurry Tor divorce an' can't wait till daylight; an' what elso d' you think?" "What elso? Wall, I wouldn't be s'prisod t' hear of anything." "An' I saw a fun'ral goin' licketty split, with an automobile hearso lead in' tho' percesslon an' settin' th' pacel" "Wall, Si, I s'posa they have t' git th' dead ones, out o' th' way in a hurry t' give th' live ones room, eh?" —"Judge."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GOING CHEAP. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

COINC CHEAP. Somo timo ago a man wtrs awakened in tlio night to find his wifo weopin® uncontrollably. "My darling I" ho exclaimed, "what is tlio matter?" "A dream!" slio gasped. "1 Iiavo had such a liorriblo dream." Her husband begged her to toll it to him, iji order that ho might com fort her. Aftor long persuasion alio was induced to say this:— "I thought I was walking down tho street, and I eamo to a warehouse whero thdro was a largo placard, 'Husbands for salo.' You could got beautiful ones for fifteen hundred pounds, or even for twelve hundred, and very nico looking ones for as low as a hundred." • The husband askod innocently: "Did you seo any that looked liko me?" Tho sobs becamo strangling. "Dozens of them," gasped.tho wifo, "dono up in bunches liko asparagus, and sold for ten shillings a bunch." Ho who lives a rational and noblo lifo is over reminding himself of tho supremo purpose for which ho lives, and ho is prepared to mako sacrifices to-day-that he may find himself hon...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.) A SHORT STORY. A STRATEGEM OF LOVE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

(Ail riant9 bsgsnv*d.) A SHORT STORY. A STRATEGEM OF LOVE. (BY FLORENCE HOPE.) Author of "Vrcttv Corner," "The Colonel's Joy," "A Love Knot,"^ "April Folly," "A Vivid Impression," ate. In the boughs of a strong old apple tree there swung' to and fro a girl with tumbled hair, rose-tinted cheeks, and eyes that laughed just with the joy of living on such a lovely day. She had rigged up the swing her self and she was mightily proud of it. What eared she that she was a tres passer on Lord Glenthorne's estate ? Nobody ever came there; she did no harm, and she did love the orchard so; it almost seemed to belong to her, for she knew every one of the trees, and they knew her, for had she not tried each in turn to see which was the most comfortable to sit in, and the best in which to fit a swing? A gate clicked, and she peered through the branches and showers of blossom to see who it could be. A man—a stranger—a tramp, she thought, and let herself die slowly, the creak of the ropes making an ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CANDID. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

OANDID. The toucher lmd sot tlio boyo this -nbjiH't for composition: ".What would l "i!o if I camo mt0 possossion of £30,000?" , . 0no littlo follow, nftor chowiUE lus pen for somo timo, roturnod a blank' "What's tho moaning of this?" do manilwl tho teacher. •'That," ropliod tho prenociouB youth, ' "is what I'd do if I bad £'50,000 ■"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR YOUNG FOLKS. POOR THING! [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

< V01l YOUNG POJjKS. POOR THING! little Elsie (looking nt the giraffe tho /.mi) : "Oil, mamma. 1 They in nil' that poor thiug staml in the tu haven't .hey?" . ' Mamma: "Why do y?" say ray (kMttle lilsie: "Look at all its freck les." '

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A TALE OF PRINCE EDWARD. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

A TALE OF PRINCE EDWARD. Our jrood King: Edward was wor shipped by all his grandchildren. They regarded him as grandfather first and ting afterwards. Some years ago, before young Prince Edward of Wales had arrived at the di'' ' of trousers, a children's f d called at York House with him to try on. She was in antechamber, when'the | :suddenly and the little ( dashing out. ^.u corac in with my new suit, ^.uircome in," he cried. The outfitter hesitated, explaining hat it might not be convenient for her 10 enter the royal nursery just then. .■ "It's all right; come along," said the Prince dragging her inside by the hand. "There's nobody here that mat Icrs—only grandpapa!" And to the visitor's astonishment, ;he suddenly found herself in the pres. ence of the King, who was playing with his grandchildren.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TAME SQUIRRELS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

tamf. squirrels. You all know that squirrels store tip mils lor winter use, and a writer who owns a pair of tame squirrels tells how tjicy were generally kept supplied with nuts which they had in a special corner of the little room they occupied. They 1 were also given bread and milk and other food. One day the nuts ran short and there was a long delay in getting fresh sup plies. It was autumn, and the squir rels were visibly anxious. The win ter's store must be got in. Presently the writer heard a great noise in their room, and, peeping in, saw them busily pushing and trund ling- the empty saucer towart^s their store corner. It was quite evident that the cun ning squirrels thought by so doing tliev insured at least a supply of bread and milk for the winter.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KINDLY MEANT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

KINDLY MEANT. Murphy approached tho house of Mrs. Malono with a troubled look. He was tho bearer of bud nows, atul was fooling vory miserable. Ho wont round to tho buck of the houso and found Mrs. Malono at hor wash-tub. ''JVjCra. Malono," said ho, "I Ikivo an unfortunate tiling to tell you." "And what may Miat bo, Josoph Murphy?" "Your good man, Mrs Malono, Iw* mot with an Accident," "An aceidont? What kind of dont?" Mrs. Malono, Ko was ovorcomo by the heat at tho foundry this iiioniiug.' uAnd is ho Qoiiing ovor it?" "Well, ma'am, I shouldn't think 6° Ho fell into tho furnace/'- 219

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COST HIM NOTHING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

COST HIM NOTHINC. Scone: Bankruptcy Court. Tho at torney for tho assignoas—aftar whis pering emphatically with tho principal creditor, rises with an air of very groat importance, as if about to elict an astonishing revelation. Attorney (to bankrupt): "Noir, sir, I've a question to nsk you. You keep a liorso do you not?" Bankrupt; "I do." Attorney: "And what might the koep of this horse have cost you?" Bankrupt: "It has cost mo no thing." Attorney: "No, of course, it lias cost you nothing. Pray'have you over riddon it?" Bankrupt: No; but my liltlo boy has." Attorney: "Ah, havo you sold tha liorso?" Bankrupt: "No, I lurvo not." Attoinoy: You havo not sold it? Then .whore is.it now?" Bankrupt: "Well, when I U'ft home it was standing boforo the lire with a pair of slioots taking an ainng ™ it." (Explosion in court. Tlio attorney looks daggors at tho principal creditor and thunderbolts art the bankrupt, who immediately receives hia dis charge.)

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KNEW NOTHING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

KNEW NOTHINQ. "Father," asked the small boy of an editor, "is Jupiter inhabited?" "I don't know, my son," was tlve truthful answer. Presently, he was interrupted again. "Father, are there any soa ser pents?" ; "I don't know, my son," Tiio little fellow was manifestly cast down, but presently rallied, and again approached the great sourco of in formation. "Father, what does the North Polo look like ?" But, alas! again the answer, "I don't know, my son." At last, in desperation, ho inquired with withering emphasis, "Father, how did you get to bo an editor?"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HE WAS RESOURCEFUL. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

HE WA8 RESOURCEFUL. i A rosourceful canvasser io a linrd | irian to got- tho hotter of him. Witness ! the experience of tho man, of whom a lawyer told in a runout altor-dinnor speech'. On tlio way to the railway station one morning ho was halted hy u. hook eanvassor, and bein;r, a great reader, lio bought u book for a sove reign. "It will bo somothing to road on tho train," ho thought, as ho gave his naino and accepted flio receipt. It was a dull book, however, and ! tho purchaser loft it at his office; but on his return homo that evening there was another copy on tho library table, and his wifo explained that tho ean vassor had loft it, and had collected a sovereign, saying that such wero hor husband's orders. Hubby was wild with rago. "If I had that chap hero," ho growled, "I'd fell him, tho dastardly hound I" "Why, thero ho goes now!" cried his wifo. "Look—hurrying down tho street towards tho station!" Tho victim rushed up stairs for his coat and shoos; Init while ho was dressing...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ARMY EAGLES OF NAPOLEON. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

THE ARMY EAGLES OF NAPOLEON. Before Napoleon's time it had been the custom for armies to carry lingo unwieldy flags mounted on poles which, '■while they afforded a rallying point for their corps, also drew the enemy's lire. Napoleon revived tho ancient symbol of tho Caesars. The Napoleonic eaglo itself was eight inches in height and nine inches across the wings. It stood on a brass block three inches squaro, and weighed throo and a half pounds. Modern colors, cumbersomo. as they ^re» aromas nothing compared to tho old ones,. which were as difficult to hido aa tho big drum.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A STORY OF FREDERICK THE GREAT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

A STORY OF FREDERICK THE , GREAT. A colonel in the Prussian Army, who had been discharged at the dose of the Seven Years' War, importuned Frederick the Great to be reinstated. Weary of the incessant solicitations of his troublesome visitor, Frederick at length gave orders that he should never be admitted to his presence. Some weeks later a most bitter libel against his Majesty appeared. Freder ick seldom gave himself any concern about such attacks; but the present one exasperated him so much that he offer ed a reward of fifty friedrichs of gold for the discovery of the author. The day following the disgraced colonel de manded and obtained an audience. "Sire," he began, on being admitt ed, "your Majesty has just promised fifty friedrichs for the discovery of the author of a recent publication. I am come to claim the recompense. Be hold in me the unfortunate libeller 1 My life I forfeit freely; but remember your royal pledge, and, while you punish me, send to my poor wife and children...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. THE HARDENING OF SOFT IRON. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

I SCIENCE NOTES & NEWS. THE HARDENING OF SOFT IRON. | To harden soft iron, wet it with i water and scatter over its .surface powdered yellow prussiatc of potash; then heat to a cherry-red heat which causes the potash to melt and coat the surface of the soft iron; then im merse quickly in cold water and re peat the operation. A white heat must not he used, as this would not harden, but oxidise, the iron. Care must be taken not to us£..red prussiatc of pot ash instead of the yellow; it will not answer.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ARTIFICIAL DAYLIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

ARTIFICIAL DAYLIGHT. A screen which can be used with an ordinary inverted incandescent mantle to produce artificial daylight has been "invented. . This would seem to be the first time that the method has been applied ill a practical form of gas. The apparatus consists of a box receptacle whitened inside, which receives light from the 'inverted mantle within the dome-like reflector mounted above it. Underneath this reflector there are two double plates of glass, the color of which is selected with a view to securing an exact imi tation of a natural north light;

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Doctoring Precious Stones. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

Doctoring Precious Stones. Under the careful treatment of a skilful "doctor" a precious stone'may very likely tfccome ten times more than its original value. Diamonds, perhaps have received more attention than any other gems. These are treated gen ' erally in order to rid them of a yellow tinge which greatly reduces their value. Pearls lose their vi tality and require very expert treat ment. The outer skin turns black as old age creeps upon them, and this has to be most skilfully removed by the "doctor." Turquoises often change in color from their beautiful blue to a kind of a sea-green, and they then have to be skinned and repolished. Rubies which get "run down" are improved in colour anil appearance by the application of a certain vegetable dye. The "patient" ig subjected to a course of massage until the normal growth of good health is maintained. Sapphires gener ally have to be reduced in vitality. Their coloring has frequently to be softened down by a series of baths of liquid a...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RANDOM READINGS. LONGEVITY. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

RANDOM READINGS. LONGEVITY. It is generally maintained that we Vivn longer th;in the ancients did. But researches among the tombs of Roman times in Italy and Spain are far from proving this. There was certainly a larger infant mortality, but the expec tation of life between fifty and .sixty in ancient Rome was equal to our own, and after sixty the Romans had the advantage. Soldiers, in particular, lived to an extreme old age, in some cases reaching 100 year|.\ The longev ity'of the Romans was due to a high infant mortality. Only the fit survived. By taking- great care of the young we have reduced this mortality, but at the same time we have not added to the average length of life. This is not difficult to understand, for if the weak ly and the delicate survive childhood, they do not as a rule live to old age. ; A high rate of infant mortality means in fact a low death rate after sixty, and vice-versa. The ancient Roman had \ a less chance of living to twenty, but if he survived he h...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Hallowe'en in Ireland. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

Hallowe'en in Ireland. Island peoples arc always lovers of legends, and Ireland, peopled with Celtic blood and chiefly surrounded by "melancholy ocean," especially treas: arcs these ideas of supernatural in fluence. Indeed, in some parts of the country All Hallows* Eve is still called "The Vigil of Saman"—Saman being the Druid lord of death. On this day peasants, armed with sticks go from house to house, collecting bread cakes, butter, cheese eggs, and money for next day's feast. They demand these preparations for the festival in the name of St. Colomba, and present lighted candles in his honor. Nuts, always connected with Hallowe'en, are eaten in abundance, and nutshells are burnt that fortunes may be told from the ashes. Apples have also always been in high favor at this season. The young girls believe that if they throw a ball of yarn out of the window,and wind it on the reel within, and then repeat the Lord's Prayer backwards, with their eyes fixed on the yarn, they will see the...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IT WASN'T ENCOURAGING. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

IT WASN'T ENCOURACINC. A tramp railed at tho houso of a gentleman and obtained a hearing. "I'vo walked many miles to see yon, sir, becauso people told mo that you was very kind to poor chaps liko mo." "Oh*, they said so, did they?" "Yes, sir; that's why I came." "And are you going back the same way P" "Yes, sir." "Then in that case, will you bo good enough to contradict this rumor?" Ono may bo insupportable oven with virtue, talent, and good conduct. Man ners, which ono neglects sometimes as littlo tilings not worthy of notice, aro just tlvoso very things from which men often decide our character. Tho knowledge of tho most insigni ficant thing is worth having.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ANABIOSIS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 11 April 1914

ANABIOSIS. Anabiosis, it Btuto whoro nil vital fmictioiiB of the mo suspoiicl cd, without, however, death occurring, lms been known for about 1200 yearn, ill tlio case of somo of tlio lower ani mals, which can bo dried and restored to'life, ovon aftor u considerable tirao, merely by tho action of moisturo, says tlio "Seientilie American." A lluasian sciontist, Professor Bacli motiof, has tried to ascortiau whether phenoinona such as theso could not as Well bo observed in tho caso of highor organisms. Whilo examining insocts at decreasing tomperaturos, ho l'ound that tlia tomperaturo of their body, after Touching tho freozing point of water, would gradually fall us low as Gdog. Cent, (in tho caso of somo species oven 7dog. Cont.), in order afterwards to riso ono dogreo, and oventually to continuo falling regularly and gradual ly. Death would only occur at lOdeg. Profossor Bachmetiof first thought death to bo duo to tho freezing of humors, but ho Boon found that tho insect bodies alre...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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