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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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' FIEST VI0T0EY; AND THEN WHAT? [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

' FIEST VI0T0EY; AND THEN WHAT? Let no one suppose that the victory of our arms over the South is going to reconcile the Northern Abolitionists to a' settlement of our troubles. When the fighting the South in arms is over, or even the prospect of it being over, then will come the tug of war, politically. The abolitionists, headed by SUMNER in the Senate, never intend the South shall be received back'into the Union, peaceably, amicably, honorably, as States, part and parcel of this Union, as they once were. It therefore behooves every true friend to the Union as it was, and as our army is fighting to make it, to be wary and vigilant. We have full confidence in our new Secretary of War, Mr. STANTON, in Gens. MCCLELLAN, HALLECK, BUBL, GRANT, &c., &c., but we have not the faith in Congress that we probably should have, that the position of these men will be sustained. The Union feeling South will melt as snow before an April sun, if the abolition, emancipation me...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
' JI ' IIIVP i II"! From the Cumberland PHttkyterian. SCHOLARSHIP H0LDEE8 in WAYNESBURG COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

' JI ' IIIVP i II"! From the Cumberland PHttkyterian. SCHOLARSHIP H0LDEE8 in WAYNESBURG COLLEGE. We take this method of saying to you that we will meet you at THOMAS POLLOCK'S in Jefferson, Greene county, on Monday, March 24th, from 9 o'clock, A. M., until 11 A. M. At Dr. JOHN CARY'S, in Proaperl ity, on Tuesday, March 25th. Will Bro. Edmiston meet us there? At NATHANTIL CLARK'S business room in Waynesburg, on the afternoon of the 26th, and the forenoon of the 27th of March. I will also be at the meeting of the UNION PRBSBTTERY, on the Jirsld&y of its Spring Session. The object of thus meeting you at the above places, is that we may receive the interest due on your notes, and alao to favor those whose notes are due, with the opportunity of paying them off, and lifting them. We would say to those who made pledges at theSynod, (heldinCarmichaels in the way of donations, we expect thetU met also. A majority of them have promptly paid, while some few have not paid anythi...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

__ MERCHANTS WM. A. PORTER, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods, Groceries, Notions, &c, Main street. Sept. ll,)801-ly. GEO. HOSKINSON, Opposite the Court House, keeps always on hand a large stock of Seasonable Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and Shoes, and Notions generally. Sprit. U, 1861—ly; ANDREW WILSON, Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Drugs, Notions, Hardware, Queeneware, Stoneware, Looking Glasses, Iron and Nails, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Main street, one door east of the Old Bank. Sept. 11,1861—ly. R. CLARK, Dealer in "Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, Queensware and notions, one door west of the Adams House, Main street. Sept. 11, 1861—ly. MINOR & CO., Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods, Groceries, Qtieensware, Hardware and Notions, opposite tne-Green House. Main street. Beit. 11,1861—ly,

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

SPOT AKD SHOE DSAI.EHS ™ Xl>rc6sGRAy, Boot and Shoe maker, Main street, nearly opposite] the "Farmer's.and Drover's Bank." Every style of Boot's aqd Shoes constantly on hand or made to order. aiipi.11, 1861—ly. Z. J. B. RICKEY, ifootand Shoemaker, Bayer's Corner, Main street. Baoof and Shoes of every variety always on hand or made to order on short notice. Sett. 11, 1861—ly.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

, PHYSICIANS BR. A O. oaoss WOULD very respectfully tender bis services as a PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, to the people of Wafaesburg and vicinity. He hopes by a due appreciation of human life and health, and strict attention to business, to merit a share of public patronage. Waynesburg, January 8, 1863. DR. D. W. BRADEN, Physician and Surgeon. Office in the Old Bank Building, Main street. Sept. 11, 1861—lv.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
— „ i — - ¦ .... » ^ m «¦¦ * — A New Disease. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

— „ i — - ¦ .... » ^ m «¦¦ * — A New Disease. An Alabama volunteer writes from one of the rebel camps: "There's a new disease broken out here—the 'camp disease,' they call it. The first symptom is a horror of gunpowder. The patient can't abide the smell of it, but is seized with a nervous trembling of the knees, and a whiteness about the liver, and a longing inclination to advance backward. That's the way the water serves mad dogs. Then comes what our Major calls home fever; and next the sufferer's wife and nine children ai-e taken sick; after which the poor fellow takes a collapse, and then a relapse. But it's mighty hard to get a discharge, or even a furlough—awful hard. Fact is, you can't do it without working the thing very low down. "I tell you what, Bob, between you and me, I'm afraid I'm taking the disease myself; I don't like the reports we hear evory day from the coast.— Wo hear cannon booming down there by the hour, and they say the Yankees are going to play the ve...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Gov. Wise and his Dead Son. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

Gov. Wise and his Dead Son. The Norfolk correspondent of the Richmond Dispatch, under date of the 15th inst., writes:—"Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, Gen. Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be opened. Then, 1 learn from those who were present, a scene transpired that words cannot describe. The old hero bent over the body of his son, on whose pale face the full moon thew its light, kissed the cold brow many times, and exclaimed in an agony of emotion, "Oh, my brave boy, you have died for me —you have died for!" That powerful old hero of Eastern Virginia, as famous for the generous impulses of his soul as for his bravery and prowess, recovering now from his illness, and nerved perhance more strongly by the great loss he has sustained, will fight the enemy with an energy and a determination that will scarcely be successfully resisted by the congregated enemies of freedom and humanity."

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Case of Insanity. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

A Case of Insanity. "Simon Brown was a dissenting minister of great intellectual powers. He became insane. His delusion was, that he had fallen under the sensible displeasure of God, who had caused his rational soul gradually to perish, aud left him only, in common with brutes, an animal life; that it was therefore profane in him to pray, and incongruous to be present at the prayers of others. In this opinion he was inflexible. Being once importuned to say grace at the table of a friend, he repeatedly excused himself, but the request being still repeated, and the company kept standing, he discovered evident tokens of distress, and after some irresolute gestures and hesitation, expressed with great fervor this ejaculation : 'Most merciful and Almighty God! let thy Spirit which moved upon the face of the waters when there was no light, descend upon me, that from this darkness there may rise up a man to praise thee!'" —Dr. Forbes Winslow's Obscure Diseases of the Brain and Mind. ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Gen. McOlellan. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

Gen. McOlellan. In a review of the late victories, says the N. Y. Journal of Commerce, the mind naturally reverts to the Commander-in-Chief, and the debt of gratitude which the nation owes to him for all this success. His coolness, his calm deliberation, patient waiting, working and planning, steadfastly resisting all sneers, abuse, ridicule, and his far seeing judgment are the original means to which, under God, the nation owes the brilliant success of the present time.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
An Escape. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

An Escape. A day or two since, just before the train on the Detroit and Milwaukie Road reached Grand Rapids, and while it was running down a grade at a high rate of speed, the fireman, a short, fat, jolly son of the Emerald Isle, went to the forward part of the engine to oil up, and, in doing so, missed his hold and pitched off the locomotive. The engineer at once whistled down the brakes, reversed his engine, and finally brought his train to a halt. The conductor rushed out, breathless, to learn the nature of the stoppage, and was informed that the fireman was killed. The train was slowly backed up to discover and secure the remains of the unfortunate man; and when nearly back to the scene of disaster, the indomitable genius was discovered running up, none the worse for the fall. His first salutation, on getting within earshot was, "Is it the ile can yez are afther?" The fireman can consider himself as one of the exempt from railroad accidents.— Detroit Free Press.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
aj^^^^^^^ Sk jj der ^^^^^^^ [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

aj^^^^^^^ Sk jj der ^^^^^^^ ,,, at the time the inexplicable mystery of hie lot—his insanity. Earnestly should the man that suspects himself of talent, pray, 1st, that he should not know it from himself ; and, 2diy, that he should not know it from other people. _•*«_ sWThe brave "Union soldier who carried captive the heart of a beautiful and wealthy heiress at Richmond, and is soon to be married to her, is Sergeant Moulton, of the third Connecticut Regiment. He was taken prisoner at Bull Run, sent to Richmond, and attracted the notice of the young lady, who supplied the object of her affection with clothing, luxuries and money, exchanged miniatures with him , and has eloped from the rebel capitol m order tq share his fortunes. a®» We yesterday heard a neatly dressed, anxious looking young woman enquire for a letter at the post office. The clerk "dealt" the package and shook his head in a negative manner, when the woman turned away and sobbed as if her heart would break. We...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Young Old People. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

Young Old People. borne look old at less than forty; others beyond- three score have the vivacity, the sprightliuess and the spring of youth. One of the most active politicians of the times is now in his seventy-fifth year, and yet goes by the name of "the ever youthful Palmerston;" and with the weight of nations on his shoulders, will find time to take a rapid ride on horseback daily, from ten to twenty miles. The heavy cares and severe labors of the Earl of Malmsbury average eleven hours a day, and yet at the age of fifty years, he is scarcely above forty in appearance. It is by no means an uncommon thing to read the .deaths of men and women of the - English nobility at eighty and ninety years, to be accounted for in part by their taking time to do things, and thereby doubling the time for doing them. The British are a dignified people, with the result of being as a nation, the most solid the most substantial, and the greatest on the globe. They are worthy of the greatness...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
. The Dying Star. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

. The Dying Star. Like these drooping, dying stars, our loved ones go away from our sight. The stars of hopes, our ambitions our prayers, whose light shines ever before us, leading on and up, they suddenly fade from the firmament of our hearts, and their place is empty and dark. A ' mother's steady, soft and earnest light, that gained through all our wants and Arrows ; a father's strong, quick light, that kept our feet from stumbling in the dark and treacherous ways; a sister's light, so mild, so pure, so constant and so firm, shining upon us from gentle, loving eyes, and persuading us to grace and goodness ; a brother's light, for ever sleeping in our souls, all our goings and our comings; a friend's light, true and trusty—gone out for ever? No! no ! The light has not gone out.— It is shining beyond the stars.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Encouraging to Smokers. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

Encouraging to Smokers. There is said to be living in Oswego, New York, a man one hundred and eighteen years old, who has smoked for one hundred years, and consumed a thousandPpounds of weed. Moreover, as showing that he is not likely to end in smoke, he is the father of twenty-five children, all living. ¦ —«¦%» tSS'K you want to gain any man's good opinion, take particular care how you behave the first time you are in company with him. The light you appear in at first, to one who is neither inclinable to think well or ill of you, will strongly prejudice him either for or against you. ^?^- . __ t©K)ur thoughts, like the waters of the sea, when exhaled toward heaven, will lose all their bitterness and saltness, and sweeten into an amiable humanity, until they descend into gentle showers of love and kindness upon our fellow-men. 1 «• i »5F"A North Carolinian upon hearing that grass was growing in the streets of his native city became frantic with joy. The idea that grass would g...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
^^^^^^^^^^^mm^^m^m^ Bellows on Prominent Men. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

^^^^^^^^^^^mm^^m^m^ Bellows on Prominent Men. Rev. Dr. Bellows delivered a leetureb on the war, in Portland, last week, in the course of which he thus sketched some of the prominent members of the government. We quote from the report in the Portland Transcript: President Lincoln he characterized as simple, faithful, firm unwavering, unambitious, honest—not a genius—Jackson had not a more unbending will, and I am sure he was not honester—just the man to hold the helm at this time—doesn't care a snap whether he is to be the next President or not—a long-minded, as he is a long-bodied man, looking on all sides of the question—Providence never gave us a better man than honest Abe. [Applause.] Mr. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury is Jove like in person, a man of large judgment, comprehensive mind, honest purposes—possi bly a little ambitious, as Caesar was—but incorruptible. Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of War, it would do you good to see. He looks like Chapin—a benevolent, geni...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
i oniiioi OF mm [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

i oniiioi OF mm The Rebels all Pled—Disappointment of the Troops—The Desolate Sceiie Described, dec. PHILADELPHIA, March 13.—Specials to to-day's 'Tribune say : Manassas was empty. The New Jersey volunteers entered Manassas at nine o'clock this morning, and hoisted the regimental colors. The soldiers might well have gnashed their teeth with rage, for at headquarters it has been known for over a month that Manassas" was being evacuated. An intelligent private in one of the New Jersey regiments writes : i; Eight companies, under Cupt. Taylor, were the first to enter, and after sadly hoisting the flag, deployed skirmishers and took formal possession of the remainder of the works. The stores were of all kinds and descriptions, hospital and commissary stores in large quantities. Blankets and officers' baggage were thrown together in promiscuous heaps. Every style, color and make of uniform was represented. Eighty baggage wagons, several locomotivesfour or five cars, about , No-...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
iimi 01'jinfe jwfEi [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

iimi 01'jinfe jwfEi gjfek* rf \\i fag. FULL PARTICULARS OF Tiff ACTHW. The Gunboat Oregon Blown TJp--Two Hundred and Fift y Killed and Wounded-Qemplste Suooes» of the Monitor-She Fights Like a Turk, and Digs a Bole in fit« Toe-Rebel Gunboat cut in Two, &c. J BO * TBISS MONROE, March 9th.— The long-expected rebel steamer Mcrnmac has at last made her appearance, and yesterday afternoon , with the assistance of two gun-boats which came out with her from Norfolk, and the Jamestown and Yorktown, which came down from the James river, made an attack upon Newport News and the naval vessels stationed at that place. The Merrimac was first seen from the ramparts of Fortress Monroe, on her way to Newport News, at about a quarter before one o'clock. The rebel gunboats followed her. They all carried the Confederate flag at the stern. The gunboats had a French flag at the masthead, and the Merrimac had a flag at her bows, which was described by some as a Commodore's blue flag, and ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Late Engagement With the Merrimar;. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

The Late Engagement With the Merrimar;. FORTRESS MONROE, March 10th.— The gunboat Whitehall took fire at 2 o'clock this morning, and was totally destroyed. Three of her guns which were all shotted, went off at intervals, and one shell burst iu the air and sent several fragments in various directions, doing no damage.— The other gun was saved by the harbor crew. The Minnesota was not afloat when so reported in my letter of Sunday , llcr crew having been sent on shore, her guns were spiked preparatory to her destruction, when, by the exertions of Capt. Ilowe, of the Spaulding, she was finally got off during the nig ht and resumed her usual position at the entrance of the lioads. The Monitor came down early this morning, and was most enthusiastically cheered as she passed the various vessels in the harbor. A number of gentlemen went on board during the clay. She floes not appear to have suffered at all, and is as ready as ever for another engagement. " Her officers and men speaii...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
IViCMTIONWllMmg [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

IViCMTIONWllMmg WASHINGTON. March 11.—The Intelligencer asserts this morning in positive terms that we occupy Cenlrcville, and that the rebels have cvacutcd Manassas, and says that the news has been received at headquarters. [ SECOND DISPATCH.] WASHINGTON, March 11.—Manassas has been evacuated by the rebels, and our forces have taken peaceful possesion.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
; Another Aoooxmt of Manassas. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 19 March 1862

; Another Aoooxmt of Manassas. ; PHILADELPHIA, March iz.—A spej cial to the World, describing the j 1 evacuation of Manassas, says :-— ! There was every evidence of a terrii ble panic among the rebels during the latter part of the evacuation—i Cannon were first removed, then am' ; unition , and then a speedy embarkai tion of troops commenced. But ere this was completed their frig ht increased, and ordered the destruction of all the railroad tracks and bridges, blowing up the latter from Burke's station to Manassas , a distance of nine miles. Some ofthe encampments, forage, etc.. were found impossible to remove, and they were all burned, &tc charred remains adding a vivid picture of destruction and gloom to the general desolation that could be seen •as far as the eye could reach. On the railroad track, just this side of the Junction at Maiyissas. were the ruins of a locomotive that the rebels were unable to remove, and which it was found necessary to destroy. Upon clo...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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