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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

228 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Bh "&" K Tecumseh t BY .TAMES MOONIGY. f 0 E3 B This great chief of the Shawnee and commander of the al lied northern tribes in the British service was born near the present Chillicothe, in western Ohio, about 1770, and fell in the battle of the Thames, in Ontario, October 5, 1813. His name signifies a "flying panther" i. e., a meteor. He came of fighting stock good even in a tribe distinguished foi its warlike qualities, his father and elder brother having been killed in battle with the whites. His mother is said to have died among the Cherokee. Tecumseh is first heard of as taking part in an engagement with the Kentuckians when about twenty years old, and in a few years he had secured re cognition as the ablest leader among the allied tribes. It is said that he took part in every important engagement with the Americans from the time of Harmar's defeat in 1790 until the battle in which he lost his life. When about thirty years of age he conceived the id...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE 229 his arguments that the effort was fruitless, he closed the de bate with the words: "The President is far off and may sit in his town and drink his wine, but you and I will have to fight it out." Both sides at once prepared for war, Tecumseh go ing south to enlist the aid of the Creek, Choctaw and other southern tribes, while Harrison took advantage of his ab sence to force the issue by marching against the Prophet's town on the Tippecanoe river, where the hostile warriors from a dozen tribes had gathered. A battle fought before day break of November 6, 181 1, resulted in the defeat of the In dians and the scattering of their forces. Tecumseh returned to find his plans brought to naught for the time, but the open ing of the war between the United States and England a few months later enabled him to rally the confederated tribes once more to the support of the British against the Ameri cans. As a commissioned brigadier-general in the British ser vice he command...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

230 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Coeur D'Alene Indians. Last autumn the Reverend Father Ganss visited a number of our mission schools. At the De Smet Mission, Idaho, he saw the Cceur d'Alene Indians, of whom he has writ ten the following glowing account: After passing through scenes of much misery I chanced upon a veritable Catholic Utopia a'land which God has blessed with every gift to gladden the heart of man, and where our Holy Faith reigns with wondrous vigor and un disputed sweetness that can not be paralleled on our con tinent, if it can be paralled in Christendom. In the extreme north of Idaho, near the British possessions, this unique set tlement is found. It is that of the Cceur d'Alene Indians. Father De Smet first entered this country and began his work ih 184 1. He found the Indians wild and savage Their hatred of the white man was so inappeasable that the Hudson Bay Company did not dare to establish a trading post among them. Their prowess in fighting their aboriginal enemi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 231 with golden wheat and corn crops, cultivated by themselves and white men whom they employ these elicit the admiration of every onlooker and the envy of the land-grabber. Nature alone, however, does not hold an undisputed sway in this favored spot; it is pre-eminently the dominion of Grace that prevails and rules with a supremacy that fairly causes bewilderment, The entire tribe is Catholic, and Catholic in all that the name honor, dignity and responsi bility implies. All duties of life yield to and are controlled by their religion. Its importance looms over every other consideration, enters into every detail. Let me take the First Friday of the month as an exemplification of devotion to the Sacred Heart. The tribe numbers about six hundred souls. The custom prevails that the entire tribe goes to Holy Communion on this day. Though the Indians live in a radius of forty to seventy-five miles from the mission, they erected about one hundred and fifty neat frame ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

232 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE penance. Intense devotion is pictured on every lineament of the dark, red, seamed countenances. Dimmed eyes were not undiscernible, suppressed sighs not inaudible; prostrate forms with eyes riveted on the tabernacle, or with downcast faces, beating their breasts dot the church in all directions. The work of confession-when penitents belated by swollen streams, wrecked bridges or causal mishap, retard the task goes on till after midnight. Holy Mass is offered up the next morning at half after six o'clock. Before the bell announces the hour, the church is thronged. The men occupy one side of the church, the women the other. Many of the women if not most of them bring their babies and children with them to the church. The chief Weilsholegu begins reciting the morning prayers, the Ten Commandments, and the Act of Consecration, in the Cceur d'Alene dialect, in slow, measured, subdued, sibilant, at times guttural, tones. All the prayers for Holy Commun ion are reci...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

WfmmWmwWWI1' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 233 to the Bread of Life. The whole scene, abstracting from its holy aspect, was to me as dramatic as any scene that Oberammergau could portray. The blind, the lame, the palsied, the sick, suckling infants and tender children, crowding around the altar to be united or in close touch with their Lord and God, recalled our Lord's career in Judea and Galilee, with a vividness to which no pen or brush could have done justice. After Holy Mass the whole congregation remained in church to make its thanksgiving, which again was a common prayer partici pated in by all. High Mass began with the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. A surprising feature to me, as a musician, was that the entire congregation sang the Mass in Latin without an organ accompaniment. The Mass was Gregorian. The melody was carried in astonishingly good tune; the enunciation, slow and rhythmic, allowed one to catch every word. The antiphonal method men replying to women had a savor of a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

234 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. were endeavoring to catch it, when suddenly theAngelus bell tolled. The ball was abandoned to follow the way of its own momentum, and players and spectators, with uncovered heads and on their knees, devoutly recited the Angelic Salu tation. Some United States Treaty Commissioners, who met our Indians in solemn council, were suprised to have their deliberations unexpectedly interrupted by all the Indians who, without a preconcerted sign, fell on their knees, made the sign of the cross and spent some time in prayer. Again it was the Angelus bell. Their high sense of the purest of morality is evidenced by an illustration as brave as it is instructive. One of the half-breeds there are only about half a dozen or so on the reservation deserted his wife, secured a divorce and married another woman. The Indians protested to the agent that they would not, could not tolerate this on their reservation. The agent contended that the couple were legally divorced and could...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

gfppppwiui'iii. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 235 blessed with ample means the six hundred Coeurd'Alenes possess five hundred and ninety thousand acres of land they support all their own poor and disabled. In one year they contributed two hundred dollars to the Society for the Propa gation of the Faith, and fifty dollars to the Society for the Pre servation of the Faith among the Indian Children; they have also a branch of the Philadelphia Tabernacle Society. Can you find a more faithful portraiture of primitive Christianity? Can you recall a scene more Scriptural, more in harmony with the teachings and spirit of Holy Church? Truly this is the land of the Sacred Heart! This is God's own country and these are God's elect people! If only the same results, or even approximately the same, could be found on the other Catholic reservations! Alas! in spite of heroic labors that compare with the best in the history of Catholic evangel ization, ad and depressing and almost hopeless conditions still p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

236 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. :& OM& f The Immaculate Heart of Mary. i August is justly called by some a second month of Mary on account of the solemnity of her Assumption which' is to all other feasts in her honor like a crowning festival. Catholic piety has consecrated this month to Her most pure Heart, considering it as the center of all Her virtues and merits. We might consider the Heart of Mary under different as pects, as being the most amiable, the most pure, the most sor rowful, etc, let us look at it today as the most loving of all hearts after the Sacred Heart of Jesus. "Who", says the wise man, "has measured the height of heaven and the breadth of earth?" We may apply these words to the Immaculate Heart of Her who, from all eternity, has been chosen by the Almighty as Queen of heaven and earth, Mother of God and of mankind. As nons can measure the breadth nor sound the depth of our world, so no one has ever estimated the vast capacity of Mary's Heart. Every one knows t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

pilippippWiyqBrg'STTT '"?'' ""jwrfw'n"-- -..v.iTr. . w.u...... -i,, T .tWi ' lJrwiK-Ky THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 237 whole Catholic Church we believe that Mary's Heart was Immaculate, free from original sin from the very beginning and that no evil ever entered it during Her whole life. We have no doubt that it was also the most sorrowful of all hearts, and Her loving children most devoutly commemorate the sorrow that filled Her maternal Heart on seven snecial occasions: 1. the prophecy of Simon, 2. the flight into EgyPl 3- Jesus lost in the Temple, 4. Her meeting with Jesus carrying the cross, 5. the Crusifixion, 6. when she received in Her arms the dead body of Her divine Son. 7. the burial of Jesus. But among all other charactistics that distinguish Her Heart from all others, we will mention more particularly the universality of Her love for mankind. Love always corresponds to knowledge. We cannot love those we do not know. But our love is excited and stimulated in proportion to our ac...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

' wyytywgapwwiHwwiH- qp ' i. j 'WIBpipiMPB4" 238 THE INDIAN ADV0CA1 E the beloved: "Son, behold thy Mother." By these words, sweeter than honey to our hearts, the Divine Word not only revealed to Mary Her new dignity as mother of all mankind but thereby imparted to Hera mother's heart for the children of Adam. His word, like a two-edged sword, opened the heart of the incomparable Mother so that all mankind might enter it. The universality of her love for all of us without excep tion does not interfere in any way with the tenderness of Her Heart toward each individual, rich or poor, just or sinner. Fear not, O Christian soul, that Mary loves you less because She loves all men. Her Heart is sensible to every thing that afflicts the human family and each person in particular. It is the throne of Mercy to which there is always access night and day. We may compare it to a temple erected in the centre of the universe and constructed with such art that the slightest sound produced here bel...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

Wg EDITORIAL. JTHE INDIAN ADVOCATE . II Published by the Benedictine Fathers of It It SACKED HEART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. I A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary. St. Michael and St. Iienedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TKRMS OF SUUSCniPTIONl Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma PRIVILEQKSl 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers, and Benefactors. 3 A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Eery year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one for the Dead. A 1...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

24o THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. school house. Is not education of children for time and eternity, the highest social, civil, moral and religious duty we are called upon to perform? In the German empire the total number of Catholics is placed at more than twenty and a quarter millions, divided into twenty eight dioceses. Poor Martin Luther's Reforma tion is evidently progressing backwards. The Association of the Holy Childhood for the redemp tion of children of infidels has contributed $4,000 to the So ciety of Catholic Indian Missions. The prospects are that the contribution will be made annually. It is a courious instance of the irony of history that an Institution founded in France on account of the intolerance of Protestant England should now be driven back to Eng land through the intolerance of Catholic Fiance. President Loubet of France has put off his visit to Rome until next year. The Holy Father's refusal to receive him is said by some to be the cause of the postponement. Next year...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

-ijjjjiBpiimiwm-v u'"P'!. Hi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 241 sionary, Rev. Wm. Burt, with the insignia of the Catholic Order of St. Maurice and St. Lazarus for his proselytizing work during seventeen years in Italy. "And yet" says the Tidings, "King Victor Emmanuel does not profess to be a Protestant. The idea of decorating, with a Catholic order a man who has done his best to destroy Catholicity is unique." A writer in the London Tablet affords an interesting ac count of an old statue of the Blessed Virgin which, after care ful restoration, was solemnly blessed last month by Abbot Boniface, of South Devon, and placed in a niche above an altar specially constructed for it in the temporary church of BucUfast Abbey. South Devon was of old the heart of Mary's Dowry. Numerous churches and abbeys were dedicated to her there; and, by decree of a council held in 1287, her image was to be placed in every parish church. The restored statue was venerated in the ancient church of Buckfast Abbey until...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

242 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE "We are informed that the paleface Catholics of the whole Big Knives country (United States) have formed a union to de fend the Church of God. We want to join this union and help it to fight for the interest of the Church of God. Therefore, we are of one mind that one of our headmen (chiefs) shall represent us at the next meeting of this great union, to be held at Atlantic City, August i." The resolutions are signed by thirteen chiefs, represent ing the 3,000 Catholic Chippewa Indians. Similar resolutions are being adopted by other Indian tribes, notably the Sioux who are also desirous of becoming members of the Catholic Federated Societies of the United States. These Indian Chiefs will attend the Atlantic City convention in full aboriginal cos tume and will be accompanied by several missionaries, who will act as interpreters. We have received a copy of the official call for the third national convention of the American Federation of Catholic Societies, to be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

1 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 243 f Wise and Otherwise. f ? , f Miss Lovelorn "Did you mean that as a smile at me?" Mr. Oldbeau "No my dear, it was a twinge of the rheu matism. "Those coming in after the speaker has commenced," said a new chairman after introducing a lecturer, "are re quested to do so as quietly as possible." "Jemmie," called the mother sharply, "you've been loaf ing all day. Satan always finds some work for idle hands to do. Take this basket and bring in some kindling." Pat while watching a game of base ball was sent "to grass" by a foul, which struck him under the left rib. "A fowl, was it? Begorra, I thought it was a mule!" Julia didn't like to go to school and complained a good deal of feeling ill. "Where do you feel the worst dear?" said mamma. "In school," promptly replied Julia. Tomy Ma, can I play makin' believe I'm entertainin' another little boy? Yes, dear, of course. Tomy All right, Gimme some cake for him. 'Tis sad but true. Lecturer to class: "Gentlemen mark w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

""Kiq 'K" 'wwy 244 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. if you only wait." "How long," asked the youngster? '"Till it freezes," was the cold reply. Fleshier, bishop of Nimes, was the son of a tallow chandler. A great duke once endeavored to mortify the pre late, by saying to him at the king's levee, that he smelt of tallow. To which the Bishop replied: "My lord, I am the son of a chandler, it is true, and if your lordship had been the same you would have remained a chandler all the days of your life.'.' As lady Montague was walking through a public garden with' a party, she was very much annoyed by an impertinent coxcomb, who was continually making some foolish obser vation. On approaching one of the churches, over which there was a Latin inscription, she took advantage of it, to ex pose his ignorance, in the hope of putting him to silence. "Pray sir," said she, "be kind enough to explan that inscrip tion to us." "Madam," said he, with an affected air, "I really do not know what it means, for I see...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

anuiimqwi. i" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 245 his life among the commoners, the working-men, the soldiers, they all went to him, just as the students and artists used to go to Father Lacordaire. Always looking after big game, Father Milleriot had, so to say, limited his apostolate to the men. He thought himself too rough to deal with the gentler sex. His confessional at St. Sulpice was literally besieged by every specimen of tough-looking Parisian. The presence of the unkempt, unshorn and ragged customers aided somewhat to keep the respectable women at a distance. One day, however, a good old woman who probably did not know of Father's speciality, walked right up into the box much ahead of the opening time and before the arrival of any of the ordinary class of penitents. When the confessor arrived and pushed back the slide, he jumped at the sight of the old bonnet and worn-out shawl. "You are in the wrong place, madam," said he, somewhat roughly, "get away from here, please; for I am here ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

246 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. A word to Catholic parents. Next month another scholastic year will take its begin ing in almost all parts of the country. Parents, no doubt, are busying themselves much in preparation for the event, and their little ones will be ready to join the educational expedi tion at the proper time. But whither are they to march? Who is to guid them? These are grave questions for parents because they imply serious obligations. They are serious for the child because its future civil and religious welfare depends much upon the training given it at this period of life. Parents, therefore, who have this twofold interest of their children at heart, will take care that the little ones are given into the hands of those who will strive to secure the desired purpose. They will .place them in such institutions only where these lessons are taught. In other words, Catholic parents will send their children to Catholic schools, because in these alone is true education at tained. T...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

247 H v$& THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Catholic Congress among the SIOUX INDIANS of North and South Dakota in session at St. Benedict's Mission, Standing Rock Agency, South Dakota, June 26, 27, 28, 1903. Special Correspondence Indian Advocate. sr $r ON Thursday evening June 25, Rt. Rev. Bishop John N. Stariha of Lead, South Dakota, was expected at St. Benedict's Mission, where the Catholic Congress of Sioux Indians from Standing Rock, Devil's Lake, Cheyenne River, Rosebud, Pine Ridge, Crow Creek, and Lower Brule, was to beheld. On account of the great distance and other impeding circumstances no delegates could come from Rosebud and Pine Ridge. Those present were probably to the number of 3,000 or more. Extensive preparations had been made long before by the home societies for the reception of the Bishop, priests and delegates from other reservations. The members of St. Joseph's Society and a number of schoolboys all on horseback met the Bishop on the river landing, three miles south of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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