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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. The next day which was Sunday, we spent putting shelves on the walls and unpacking our things and then finished cleaning up every inch of the yard outside. Ben propped up the sagging porch the best he could and at sundown we were all sitting out there just looking our surroundings over. We watched the children from the huts up the road as they came running towards us throwing green cotton boles and hollering, "Hi ignorant hillbillies." or some other such things. Then we saw a red car with no top driving toward our house. Ben said it was Mr. Langley's convertible car that had a top that would go up or down just by pushing a button. Mama said, "Land sakes, but I've never heard of the likes of that." The car stop...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

Ozark Dreams Continued From Page 14. so he offered to let Mr. Danvill have an opportunity to gain back some of his money in a friendly crap game. Someone brought out a jug of corn liquor. It was a shame the way they carried on. They were the singinest, dancinest, sinninest bunch of no good gamblers I've ever seen. Toward the morning someone placed Mr. Danvill in his truck to sleep after his insides were filled up with liquor and his pockets emptied of money. Then King Cube led the folks in singing, hand clapping, and dancing. He made up a song about being in the land of milk and honey. That carrying on went on until daybreak. So Mr. Langley, that's why these folks is sleepy this morning. They's been seeing a mean man get his dues from above." Mr. Langley said, "Well, seems to me, Mrs. Moses, that his just dues came from Memphis." We finally all got lines out in the fields and settled down to the serious business of picking cotton. So with heads low, backs bent and hands moving, we g...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

''>./'.l>*> - • * • . < * v 1 « PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 Herb Doctors - Harvesting Nature Not so long ago in the Appalachian mountains - where towns, and even roads, were few and far between - medical doctors were rare items indeed. People depended on granny women and herb doctors to deliver babies, prescribe cures, and tend to injuries. These skilled men and women depended on nature to provide remedies for all ailments. Mountain people were more likely to use a cure from the local herb doctor than to trust anything a medical doctor prescribed. They had more faith in nature than in newfangled scientific medicines. This trust probably saved many lives that herbs alone, would not. Doctors now know that a patient's faith in his treatment affects the effectiveness of that treatment. Dr. William A. McGarey. M.D. of the A. R. E. Clinic in Arizona and Director of the Edgar Cayce Foundation Medical Research Division, states in his bo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

On a warm, spring day late in the morning when the sun has burned off the dew and the hay is dry enough, I climb on the tractor to mow hay for the magnificent Belgian draft horses grazing in the pastures. As I begin work, I glance behind the tractor and mowing machine and watch the grass fall in swaths that lay like long blankets in the field. Tiny yellow butterflies dart about, drinking the fresh juices from the tender, succulent hay. Already I anticipate finding my favorite spot in the meadow where a rare combination of grasses and precious weeds grow, because their mixture of fragrances always take me back to my grandparents' little farm in the 1950'5. I remember their white house perched on top of a little hill in the middle of the farm. A huge walnut tree centered the front lawn, and flower beds were all around. Theirs was not the fashionable, city lawn covered in one even grass, groomed to perfection; nonetheless, it was perfectly beautiful to me after its Saturday afternoon c...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 The following is an excerpt from the book "The Talking Hills", by Hazel P. Hedrick. You may order copies of the softback book (121 pages and lots of old photographs) by sending $7.00 per copy to Hazel P. Hedrick, Route 3, Box 687, Ridgeway, Va. 24148. It is the story of one family who has lived in a hard, but sheltered environment in the Brushy Mountains of western North Carolina and what the family faces when it is forced out of that peaceful hollow into the outside world. Until this day I thought memories were just thoughts and feelings of things and times past, stored away in the unused corners of the mind, and for the most part left to fade away with time and age. I believed memories were all invisible, until this day. But the sights and sounds I see and hear today are as vivid and real as when I was experiencing them more than sixty years ago. All I have to do is close my eyes and listen. I can see my Mama, with dark auburn hair combed bac...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

BACKROAD (Continued from Page 24) the pampered elegance of world class accommodations or camp in a wilderness setting with only nature and a star filled sky as your companions. The Blue Ridge Highlands were considered a land of opportunity by the Cherokee and Shawnee who once lived and hunted throughout our ridges and valleys, and later such notable pioneers as Daniel Boone opened the American frontier over trails blazed through the region. Both, the native American and the American pioneer, discovered the allure and loved the beauty of this rugged region. By exploring the Blue Ridge Highlands you will join with the Cherokee, the Shawnee and Boone, you're part of the adventure and, we hope, you'll become part of one of America's oldest traditions; the tradition of falling in love with the Blue Ridge. Be sure to bring along your camera and plenty of film! From old weathered barns and mountain farms to wildlife and picturesque trout streams, the photo opportunities along this month's ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 BACKROAD (Continued from Page 19) sprout from the base of decaying stumps and sometimes rise to heights of 20 feet or more before succumbing to the still present blight. They represent a determination and will that is a common characteristic of mountain people. Even today institutions such as Virginia Polytechnic Institute are devoting research to conquering the Chestnut blight in hopes that the seedlings will someday survive. 7J (1.1) We are now crossing the bridge over the New River on 1-77. Looking to our left we have a riverside view of the Shot Tower Historical State Park. We will be stopping at the Park, but must go up to the next exit and loop back in order to reach it. 9.2 (1.5) Here we will leave 1-77 at Exit 5, the Poplar Camp exit off of 1-77. 9.5 (0.3) At this stop sign we will turn left onto 69 east, going under the 1-77 bridge. 9.8 (0.3) We are now in the community of Poplar Camp, Virginia. 9.9 (0.1) At this stop sign we will turn...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

Mountain", by Richard C. Davids focuses on Buffalo Mountain and the life story of Reverend Bob Childress. It offers a rare insight into mountain life during the first half of this century. It is an excellent book we highly recommend to everyone and may be purchased at Mayberry Trading Post which we will pass further along in our tour. 58.0 (1.2) Looking sharply back to our right at this point we can see the resort community of Cascade Mountain. 63.5 (5.5) Picturesque Bluemont Church is now on our right. It is one of the five Presbyterian Churches built of native stone by Reverend Bob Childress. 65.5 (2.0) The Olean Puckett Cabin is on our left at this point. She was a mountain midwife who brought hundreds of babies into the world but none of her own children survived infancy. 66.2 (0.7) Groundhog Mountain Overlook is on our right. It provides an excellent view of Piedmont North Carolina. 66.6 (0.4) The entrance to Groundhog Mountain Exhibit Area is on our right. Here you will find e...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 22 'MOUNTAIN LA'U Rl£L.' FEBIRU'A'RY; 1989 BACKROAD (Continued from page 21) onto the exit ramp leading to Route 8. 90.9 (0.1) At this stop sign we will turn right onto Route 8 north toward Floyd, Virginia. 96.7 (5.8) We are now entering the town of Floyd which was originally called Jacksonville, in honor of President Andrew Jackson. 96.9 (0.2) On our left at this point is Cockram's General Store where each Friday night local folks and visitors gather for the Friday Night Jamboree. The "Jamboree" features impromptu mountain music beginning around 7:00 each Friday night. Musicians come from far and wide to take a turn on the small stage area in the back of the Store. Friday nights you'll find up to 100 musicians scattered upstairs, outside on the sidewalk or in the alley between the Store and Floyd Farm Service making real oldtime mountain music. There is no charge for this event and it is one the entire family will enjoy. 97.0 (0.1) At this stoplight we are at the intersection ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

Advertisement Virginia's Southwest Blue Ridge Highlands March & April Calendar of Events For More Information Call: National Toll Free 1-800-365-6927 or 703-789-7194 or Write: VSBRH Post Office Box 640 Floyd, Virginia 24091 March 3-5 The Blacksburg Lawn, Garden and Spring Spruce Up Show held at the Blacksburg Community Center, Montgomery County. This event involves nurseries, landscaping, lawn and garden equipment, furniture, realtors, and interior design displays. Contact the Blacksburg Community Center, Patrick Henry Drive, Blacksburg, Va. 24060 or phone 703-961-1135, March 10-12 and March 17-19 Wytheville Community College Spring Musical sponsored by the Drama and Music Departments of Wytheville Community College to be held at the George Wythe High School Auditorium, 1500 West Pine Street, Wytheville, Va. Write Wytheville Community College, 1000 East Main Street, Wytheville, Va. 24382 or call Dr. Janice Scudder at 703-228-5541 for show times. March 20 Travel Log, one ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

"The Heart of the Blue Ridge" 'ftkouni&Mt JLaurel Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life QFebruary 1989 Volume 5 Number 6 $1.25 PAGE 24 are hidden away on mountain backroads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our B ACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite places with you each month. HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On ba...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

« t For Christmas 1987, Susan Thigpen presented me with an original copy (including original dust jacket) of Zane Grey's, The Last Trail. It was published as a part of the Triangle Books series by The Blakiston Company of Philadelphia. The copyright date is 1909, placing the book among Grey's first works. « It is by no means an expensive edition and resembles nothing more than a school boy's copy of a gateway to daydreams and flights of adolescent imagination. As a school boy I devoured countless such books as I combed the shelves of Longview Elementary School's Library for its contemporaries which fueled my flights of fancy with stories of Daniel Boone, Lewis and Clark and other mountain men who pushed the American frontier to the Pacific. Susan didn't even bother to erase the penciled in price of $2.00 from the title page. She knew I love old books and would treasure her gift forever regardless of price. During the Christmas holidays, I read the old book and found it hopelessly en...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 I ask myself over and over why people have phobias and fears. I have many of them today. I wonder if things that happened to me when I was a child have anything to do with it today. When I was very young, older people thought that one must go on and do the things they were afraid to do to overcome their fears. I remember some things my dad made me do that frightened me no little bit I remember one time when he wanted me to go with him to a mill that we had not been to in a good long time to get some buck wheat flour. We got started bright and early. My mom dressed me up in a pair of new brogan shoes and a long dress that came down below my knees and tied a little bonnet on my head. I looked more like a little Dutch girl than I did myself. I was doing all right until we came to a big creek. The bridge had washed out and someone had cut a big tree down across the creek for people to walk across. I saw that and it scared me. The water was deep and...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

My grandmother told me this story when I was a little boy. She was born in 1840. She knew both Sporty and Molly. He once had a name but she had almost forgotten what it was. Everybody always called him Sport. Sport did not resemble anything of what the word Sport seems to mean, with his old floppy black hat, a linsey shirt with the buttons missing. His breeches were held up by a single gallus and pinned with crabapple thorns. An outsider had given him the name. Most likely the outsider had heard of Mendel's experiment with flowers. A sport is an individual that has no resemblance to its ancestors. Certainly Sport fit into this category. A sister kept the Post Office nearby. People had to go there for their mail for there was no R.F.D. One brother was a merchant, selling iron bars, copper sheets, sugar, salt, coffee and Lucifer matches. Another brother was a tanner, saddle maker and shoe maker. Joe was a licensed distiller and blockader. Tom was a Rough and Ready running Santa Anna o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 The Old Wytheville Fish Hatchery Excerpt from "Glimpses of Wythe County", Compiled by Mary B. Kegley Editor's Note: This is an excerpt from the book, "Glimpses of Wythe County, Virginia" compiled by Mary B. Kegley. This excellent book may be ordered from Kegley Books, Post Office Box 134, Wytheville, Virginia 24382. It is hard back, 218 pages, with area photographs and references to early Wythe County families. Price is $21.80 in Virginia; $20.95f0r out of state. Make check payable to Kegley Books. A catalog of this and other books available from Kegley Books may be obtained by writing to the same address. There must have been considerable excitement when Colonel Marshall McDonald of the Virginia Fish Commission arrived in Wytheville in August of 1879 to choose a location for a fish hatchery. After viewing the area, Colonel McDonald selected a three and one half acre tract of land donated by S.P. Browning from his farm, three and one half miles...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

Child of the 1920's , EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. The rainbow book peddlar came in 1927, in the summertime, when most of our "living" took place outside the little unpainted house on the hill. Even though he was a stranger, we gathered around his rattling old Ford truck, spellbound at the shelves of books he hauled around in the truck bed, boarded up like a cattle stall. The rainbow colored jackets set us all afire to display the books on the center table in the parlor. Mama had us catch up an armful of laying hens. She thought that would pay for the set, but the peddlar felt of their stiff-feathered wings, and their soft underfeathers, and he told her she needed to cath up six more hens if she was to get the full set. We started once again running down the plump Rhode Island Red hens, grown heavy from setting three weeks in nest cushioned with wheat straw. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 One cold day in mid winter, my sister Bessie and I were coming home from school walking about three miles. We passed by the big Lawrence Pond and started to skate on the ice. The sun had shown out some that day and melted the ice a little. As we were skating over near the middle, The ice cracked and down I went up to my knees in the icy water. I had to get out and walk about two miles nearly frozen with my feet and legs wet. I nearly froze to death, but it didn't even give me a cold as I remember. We children must have surely been healthy back in those days. I imagine it was because we were used to being out in all kinds of weather feeding animals, getting in wood in snow and rain and so on. One thing we girls would love to do, especially Bessie and I and our cousins Mildred and Roy Jewell of Roanoke was on Sunday to go over to the Cambria Station and watch the trains go by, to count the cars on each of them and also go over to the Merrimac Tun...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

Court Days in Woodstock, Virginia There is no such thing anymore as the Court Days that you have heard about. Of course, the County Court still meets at stated intervals but these Court sessions today are not accompanied by the social and commercial activity that we have come to associate with the traditional Court Days. By definition, Court Day was ihfi day when the County Court was in session. Through the years, the Court schedule has varied. In horse and buggy days, when life was less complicated and there were fewer court cases to be settled, it might have been possible to convene on the second Monday of every month. Even if there was no business to come before the Court or the docket could not be cleared in one day, the second Monday of each month was reserved as Court Day for Shenandoah County. Some Court Days were bigger than others. March was especially big. After all, it wasn't the court schedule, nor the frequency of the occurrence, that gave Court Day its particular flavo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1989 This is a story of two lives, entwined around many more, and how they finally came together. This is a saga of the Appalachian Mountains. The threads of these lives are woven together after winding around like a spider's web; much like the backroads of our beautiful mountains. It is the story of my mother and father. It all began when James Bruce, called the "Immigrant" came over from Scotland and landed on the shores of Virginia. His father was Robert Bruce of Elgin, Scotland. Sir John Bruce of Scotland was the ancestor of Robert Bruce and was the uncle of King Robert Bruce of Scotland. King Bruce had a daughter named Marjorie (that is who I am named after), who married her father's Stewart. This is where the name Stuart came from, which is the sur-name of the kings and queens of England. King James I of Scotland was the father of Mary, Queen of Scots and she was the mother of King James I of England, who had our present Bible written. He was ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1989

SURVIVAL By: Carl "Skinny" Rowland ©1989 Now old Spot and me were huntin' bear, away up high peak trail, But we only found a track or two, and those were mighty stale. So we kept right on a going, now we didn't know just where, It's sure enough the bears aint here, so the critters must be there. Well we went on down through canyons, then climbed the far off peaks, and walked on down the ridges, and splashed through cold deep creeks. Then we zigzagged forth and back, and walked around and round, but we didn't see a bear or track, as we covered miles of ground. By this time snow had started, and the wind it bent the trees, and all our grub had run out, and I thought for sure we'd freeze. Now I knew just where our home was, and that fact is for sure, but I couldn't seem to figure out, just where it was we were. Well days went by and we crawled on, and each day we got weaker, we were close to starving now, and our outlook was much bleaker. Now old Spot and me soon eyed each other, both ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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