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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 Can U.S. remain world ag leader? There is no question that American agriculture will enter the next millennium as the world's leader in food production. But will we occupy this same posi- tion in another 100 years, or even another 10 years? "American agriculture is heading for the last roundup," according to Dr. Steven C. Blank. "It is startling to think that the country will not need farmers or ranchers for much longer. But it is true," says Blank. His comments are more startling when you realize he is an agricultural economist at the University of California, and not a kook. Other nations catching up Blank is the author of a book, "The End of Agriculture in the American Portfolio." His main argument is that American agricul- ture cannot maintain a competitive advantage for much longer. Developing nations are catching up. As we lose our edge, agriculture will shrink and consumers will rely on imported food. The thought of this makes any American farmer lose his appetite. B...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau News Farmers strive to keep nutrients from rivers (Continued from page 1) mented nutrient management plans, which recommend the amount, placement, timing and application of fertilizer to reduce excess nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous, from entering Virginia's waters. Farmers work hard to keep nutrients in their crops rather than in nearby waterways, but many municipalities and homeowners don't. Richmond and Lynchburg pollute the lames River, and Alexandria pollutes the Potomac, according to Allan Brockenbrough, senior environmental engineer for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality's Piedmont Office. Last year, Richmond legally dumped 3.1 billion gallons of combined sewage and stormwater into the lames River, according to the city's "Combined Sewer System Annual Report for 1998." The Roanoke and Woodbridge DEQ offices were unable to provide CSO discharge figures for Lynchburg and Alexandria. Outdated sewage systems pollute rivers Richmond, Alexandri...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 World supplies of feed grains are in a surplus (Continued from page 1) Department. "The strength of the U.S. dollar overseas makes the situation worse," Banks said. "It makes our products more expensive overseas because of exchange rates. One of our chief competitors in agriculture, Brazil, devalued their currency, and that makes their product cheaper." "We're in a phase in which world supplies of food grains and feed grains are in a surplus," said Gerry Underwood, merchandizing manager with the Chesapeake office of Cargill Inc., which handles and trades bulk grain commodities worldwide. The world currently has excesses in soybeans, wheat and corn. "When this occurs, historically, Ag experts offer antidote for price slips By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—One remedy for the farm economy slump is for Congress to give President Clinton trade negotiating authority to reopen export markets for U.S. agriculture. Another remedy is for more and more farmers to take...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau News Agents part of reason for retaining members (Continued from page 2) price, quality and service. Our customers are better off with Farm Bureau than with other companies. A customer is often interested in benefits, and in this case a Farm Bureau membership is a big benefit. We have many services for our $40 membership: discount tires, subscription to this publication, a free classified ad each month in this publication, and representation on issues handled by state and national lawmakers. Maybe not every member will find value in the many services we offer, but I am willing to bet a large percentage will. We have something to offer that other insurance carriers do not have. The fact we offer a very complex service helps in overcoming price. Sometimes Farm Bureau agents find that a competitor has done a very poor job of evaluating the insurance needs of a customer. Examining an account and the customer's needs can often uncover glaring holes in the insurance coverage. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 Va. to help new farmers get started (Continued from page 4) matching established farmers and landowners with beginning farmers. The key is open communication and starting early. "It's not that young people don't want to get into farming. They are interested if provided the opportunity," Baker said. "There are 10 beginners for every exiting farmer. We need more exiting farmers who want to turn over their farms." The answer is successiongetting farmers to think about retirement long before they exit farming. A gradual transition gives established farmers the time to train someone and turn over management. Entering farmers would initially be an employee of the established farmer. Using labor for equity, the younger generation would gradually buy the business. For example, said Baker, on a cattle farm, the younger generation would buy the replacement cows while the older generation received the cull value. In a bad year, the established farmer would take the hit, but in a good ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau News M Jgm ■ Pi i Buffalo farm, showroom offer panorama, artwork By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor FREE UNION—As we stood only 30 feet away from the bison bull, I felt scared. "Thunderheart" weighed more than 1,500 pounds, and with his hump, he stood more than six feet high. David Hoyt, marketing director for Georgetown Farm in Albemarle County, told me to walk slowly so that Thunderheart wouldn't get upset. "Bison bulls are temperamental and easily angered," Hoyt said. Thunderheart, due to his size and disposition, has a fenced area all to himself. This is so he won't knock around the younger, much smaller bulls, which stood nearby and watched Thunderheart. I had read in the farm's Web site (www.eatlean.com): "Although usually peace-loving and quiet, a peacefully grazing animal, seemingly content filling its belly, can and will WB!^MtfStWMnr' • ' -.%+' >' ; >/** SPil B[ .|^m[ charge without any warning or apparent reason. Possibly the most dec...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 Bison roamed eastern United States until 1800 (Continued from page 8) The Web site says, "Before the coming of the white man, bison numbering in the millions roamed the plains and woods of a large portion of North America. "The Indians utilized literally all parts of the bison except its bellow. The hide was turned into robes, moccasins, clothing, teepee coverings, shields, ropes, boats and even coffins. "The bladder, stomach and other internal parts made excellent containers. The bones were used in the construction of bows, scrapers and other tools. Ribs formed the runners of dog-drawn sleds. Horns were fashioned into drinking vessels, spoons or ladles. The bison's hoofs were used to make glue, fat provided hair grease, and the gall was an ' Jjß BW oH hmSRh ' | "*•• ■ ' i M I 4 - - I 'Sk ' i W H V R1 >JttU aafeajasr, J> * Jgt*L i Tr< iSt? mPI ™ T |fpnjiMW., ; ".% >:■•"'(* 5 v Virginia horse industry grows by leaps, bounds By JOHN...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau News Antibiotics save lives of livestock, vet says (Continued from page 2) "It's a very complex issue, and more research is needed," said Dr. Terry Swecker, an associate professor in large animal clinical sciences at Virginia Tech. "The public wants to know they have a safe food supply." This concern about antibiotic use in livestock appeared 20 years ago, he noted. Antibiotic uses and antibacterial products are abundant in everyday American life. Stores, restaurants and hotels offer everything from antibacterial soap to antibacterial lotion. Some doctors regularly prescribe antibiotic drugs, especially if a patient or patient's guardian insists. "It's up to all of us to use antibiotics responsibly," Swecker said. "Drug use in humans creates resistance. It's easy for someone to say 80 percent of the ear infections in kids don't need an antibiotic. But when it's your child, you may still want your child treated with an antibiotic. Bacteria have been "waging war against ea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 New services offered at Farm Bureau By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —To better serve its members, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation is offering three new services in its public affairs department and commodity/marketing department. Farm Bureau has added an associate legislative specialist, Susan Rubin, to its public affairs department. In the commodity/marketing department, the state's largest farm organization has added a feed ingredients manager, James Bolton, as well as a price and financial risk management program, headed up by Chris Cook. Ms. Rubin was a legislative aide to Del. Watkins M. Abbitt Jr., D-Appomattox, during the 1999 General Assembly session. She will compile information on state and national issues for the VFBF Web site, said Martha Moore, director of the public affairs department. In addition, she will handle members' requests for information while other public affairs staff members are traveling or out of the office. She will also ass...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau News Forget the farmer with bib overalls and pitchfork Forget the image of the farmer with bib overalls and a pitchfork and replace it with one of a farmer with a wireless phone. You're likely to find today's farmer, especially young farmers, with his or her hand on a computer keyboard and sending email to an Extension agent in search of answers to livestock or crop questions. You're likely to see today's farmer using a mobile phone on the tractor or in the truck to make quick calls to others on the farm. Many farmers today look up com- AITC receives donations for schools RICHMOND—The Virginia Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom recently re- I AITC update ceived donations from several companies and organizations for $1,000 or more. The donations were from Birdsong Peanuts, Montgomery County Farm Bureau Women's Committee, Shenandoah County Farm Bureau, Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company, the Virginia Cotton Board and the Virginia Farm Bureau State Women's...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 Tobacco growers hit with double whammy BLACKSTONE—First the federal government told tobacco growers not to plant as much of Virginia's No. 1 cash crop, and now a potent fungus is riding Caribbean winds into the South to attack what growers plant. Blue mold fungus promises to attack Virginia's tobacco plants, even those inside greenhouses, said David Reed, an agronomist at the Southern Piedmont Agricultural Research and Extension Center, which specializes in tobacco research. In the past, growers have sprayed plants with Ridomil, the only fungicide approved and labeled by the Environmental Protection Agency for tobacco plants. However, the blue mold now threatening tobacco plants in Georgia and other states is a Ridomil-insensitive strain of blue mold. It starts out in tobacco fields in Cuba and Mexico and its Former FB director 'Doc' Robinson dies at 74 BY KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist EMPORIA—William A. "Doc" Robinson, a sixth-generation Greensville County far...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. We are not responsible for typographical errors or errors due to illegible handwriting. Classified ads carried in the Farm Bureau News do not constitute an endorsement by Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. We also reserve the right to edit or reject ads, including ads that represent a business in competition with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation or Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Companies. I Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. ♦ Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. I Cla...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

May 1999 The Farmers Market (Continued from page 14) DECOYS WANTED - I buy old wooden duck decoys. One or whole rig. Call Jerry 540- 628-8601. SLATE TYPE TURKEY CALLS - $10 each. Animal tail skinners $5 each. $3.50 shipping and handling. Call 540-228-3770. GALVANIZED AND ALUMINUM TIN - 6 to 24 foot long in stock. Rough and dressed lumber, squared treated post up to 24 foot. Max Kendall Lumber. Axton, VA. 540-650-2825. NEW SECRET LOVE MUFFIN - Improve your love life. $3. Liberty. POB 31, King George, VA 22485. GUNS - Buy, sell, trade, gunsmithing, antiques. Charlotte Court House. Bob Moates 804-542-5536. $50-$ 100 - And more in free merchandise. Beautiful gift line by House of Lloyd Details. 757-499-5628. ELIMINATE PET ODOR — Cat litter boxes, gerbil cages, horse stables including skunk odor. Free info, SASE to 107 Cherry Tree Court, Sterling, VA 20164. I.ARGE BARN FOR SALE - You tear down. Oak/pine lumber, tin. poles, blocks. 540-236-3889 Galax. LINCOLN WELDOR 300 AMP - Six cylinder...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

What is the advantage of buying your Health Insurance through the Virginia Farm Bureau? ADVANTAGE #1 The Best Value for your $ [ '' You can save money and receive better coverage. "I saved our organization $2700.00 per year in premiums while offering our staff better group coverage." E.C.B. Rocky Mount, Va. i "We are just tickled with our new health coverage and are saving over BHppjßK $3000.00 a year in premiums." Mr. and Mrs. D.T., Lawrenceville, VA. With over 30 plans, you choose the plan that fits your budget... and your needs. ADVANTAGE #2 Personal Service Over 100 Farm Bureau Offices to provide you convenient, and personal attention for your Claims processing or coverage questions ■ ADVANTAGE #3 Comprehensive Insurance Programs .IjjMf If you are under 65 — Individual and Group Plans ft, ■ If you are over 65 — Medicare Supplement and Long Term Care plans '*£ If you are a small businessman — coverage for 2-90 employees. The Farm Bureau also offers Dental, Life, Auto and Homeowne...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

Farm Bureau News, Volume 58, Number 5 Elk reintroduction proposal elicits concerns By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—WhiIe some farmers oppose reintroduction of elk into Virginia, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will remain neutral on the issue until an $85,000 study is completed. Through financial and technical assistance, the foundation has helped Kentucky and Pennsylvania reintroduce elk, said Danny Smedley, state chairman of Virginia's chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Other states, such as New York and Illinois, have opted not to reintroduce elk. The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, which will make the ultimate decision on elk reintroduction, asked the foundation to fund the feasibility study on elk. Jim Parkhurst, an associate professor of wildlife sciences at Virginia Tech, along with a graduate student, began the study in late 1997. They determined which parts of the Old Dominion would provide the best elk habitat. In May, Parkh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

Farm Bureau News Elk require extensive habitat (Continued from page 1) John Mechler, a Tennessee-based field director for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Wildlife officials returned the elk to Kentucky, he noted. A small number of elk live in Loudoun County, wild and unfenced, Smedley said. They are descendants of the elk kept on a farm there by Arthur Godfrey, a broadcaster and entertainer who died in 1983, Said Matt Knox, deer program supervisor for the game department. "There are elk running around in Loudoun County now," Knox said. "A few have been killed on the road. A hunter killed one. Commercial and residential development is curtailing their habitat. Elk require an extensive range, and they need a habitat with very little disturbance." Benefits of elk reintroduction include education and a possible boost to tourism in parts of the state, Parkhurst said. "There's no question that hunters love to hunt elk. People put down $2,000 to $3,000 for a guided hunt for elk in New M...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

June 1999 Junk science must not determine food policy Imagine visiting the grocery store and picking over less-than-appetizing apples that were grown in Argentina. They don't look or taste as good as an American apple and they cost twice as much. Or envision selecting almost tasteless, greenish tomatoes trucked in from Mexico. They aren't as fresh and much more expensive than those grown in Virginia or other parts of the United States. Imagine other fruits and vegetables across the board coming in from overseas—aii with questionabie growing practices and a far higher price than domestic produce. If the Environmental Protection Agency doesn't implement some sound science in the ongoing Food Quality Protection Act, we could be EU food ban is unfair Frankenstein's monster was a work of European fiction. So too are the reasons behind European fears of wholesome, healthy food produced by farmers and ranchers from the United States. Despite those fears, foods produced with modern techniqu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

Farm Bureau News Milking contest, free ice cream to mark event What is there about the month of June that makes it so special? One thing for sure it is the 62nd celebration of June Dairy Month with the theme of "got milk? It does a body good!" This month is an opportunity to honor the thousands of dairy farmers in Virginia and across the country who work 365 days every year producing delicious, nutritious milk. Milk is the only crop that is harvested daily with an average cow producing 90 glasses of milk a day. That's enough milk for 30 people to meet their daily requirements! In celebration of June Dairy Month, the Richmond area will play host to Dairy Day in Festival Park June 17th from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This free event will feature live cows and calves, and enough free cold milk, ice cream and cheese to satisfy your taste buds. There will be educational exhibits, drawings for door prizes every half-hour and lots of free entertainment. Miss Virginia will be at the park all day sign...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

June 1999 Virginia's grape production on the rise By MELODIE N. MARTIN Special to the Farm Bureau News RlCHMOND—Virginia wine is filling more than glasses. Successful sales and a high demand for grapes are also helping fill the pockets of both wineries and growers. And it looks as though Virginia wine will fill even more glasses, thanks to an 8 percent increase in 1998 in the state's grape production from the previous year. The state's grape producers harvested 3,185 tons of commercial grapes in 1998, an increase from 2,957 tons produced in 1997. The amount of land for grape growing also increased by 3 percent in 1998 to 1,608 bearing and non-bearing acres. Virginia, with 53 wineries and more than 140 vineyards, ranks llth nationally in volume of fine wine production. Though grape growing is one of the smallest industries in the state, it is one of the fastest growing, said Mary Davis-Barton, program manager for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Service's wine mark...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1999

Farm Bureau News •'•: - - •*& 1 ' : " J W?I "" *v4lMfc\ -WW®s ; T r Z 1 BHKEeP ti am'l ?>tiw& ;m Am HI • m - #Mp[} wVi -c* or ji t ' ~Jmk a ••'•" jS Mtii jfrfla ~ ~ 1 I—J ■ D^■&* I •••" "1 [ ' ■j^Bf —__ ; 1_ Adding value creates marketable products By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Taking raw products and adding value to them is the name of the game for a growing number of farmers in Virginia. From turning sweet potatoes into potato chips to processing their own milk, farmers are finding ways to add value to products from their farms. "As it becomes more competitive out there, people need to take their product and add value to it," said Dave Robishaw, northwest regional marketing development manager with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Mil 1 11 M2**m. In Chesapeake, Leonard Bergey and his family operate Bergey's Dairy Farm, which has a small onsite processing plant and store. They sell pasteurized milk...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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