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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Importance of Scientific Knowledge to Housekeepers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Importance of Scientific Knowledge to Housekeepers. Not many years have passed since the science of housekeeping began to be talked about. Until recently, how the idea of a housekeeper —a woman needing scientific knowledge would have beon scouted! Yet the labors of her life have been a series of philosophical and chemical experiments; though for want of the requisite knowledgo, frequently imperfect, sometimes unsuccessful, occasionally disastrous. The violation of laws and principles of which she knew nothing, has not only caused great vexation, loss and disappointment,but endangered house and furniture; destroyed life, even. Ignorance of chemical affinities and combinations has produced unnumbered woes in the household, and will continue to do so until women receive an education suited to their varied and numerous duties. Wives and mothers do not often knowingly murder their husbands and child/en; yet how many die of slow 2>oison administered, unsuspectingly, in their fo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How to Collect Odors of Flowers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

How to Collect Odors of Flowers. A fair floriculturist writes that those persons who would secure for themselves genuine odors of flowers, and at the same time pleasantly employ themselves, may do so in the following manner: Roses, and all flowers containing oils—and most highly perfumed flowers contain a quantity of oil —may bo made to yield their aromatic properties by steeping the petals or flower leaves in a saucer or a flat dish of water and setting it in the sun. The petals should be entirely covered with the water, which, by the way, should be soft—rain water would be the best. A sufficient quantity should be allowed for evaporation, and the vessel should be left undisturbed a few days. At the end of this time a film will bo found floating on the top. This is the essential oil of the flower, and every particle of it is impregnated witli the odor peculiar to the flower. It should be taken up carofully and put in tiny vials, which should bo allowed to remain open till all water...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Boiled Wheat. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Boiled Wheat. It is posßibly not as well understood as it should be, among housekeepers, that a healthful and nutritive food may be prepared by boiling wheat, to be eaten with milk or molasses—the former to be preferred when attainable. It is a first-rate thing for children, while adults may use it to advantage. Some have the wheat cracked in a mill before using, which is perhaps the preferable plan, but it will answer well without this preparation. A lady correspondent of tho Ohio Farmer says:—"The wheat should be cracked in a mill. Take one quart and put it into half a pot of warm water, and let it stand upon the stove several hours; then boil slowly, and stir it occasionally, till it becomes thick; put in a handful of salt. For children it can be used with milk. If left standing till cool, it is very nice to cut in slices and use with cream and sugar, or fry it like mush; the last mentioned I prefer for general use, but it can be prepared in various ways " If boiled whole the whe...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Purification of Lard. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Purification of Lard. Take twenty-eight pounds of perfectly fresh lard; place it in a well-glazed vessel that can bo submitted to the heat of a boiling salt-water bath, or of steam under a slight pressure. When the lard is melted, add to it one ounce of powdered alum and two ounces of table salt. Maintain the heat for some time—in fact, till a scum rises, consisting in a great measure of coagulated proteine compounds, membrane, etc., which must be skimmed off. When the liquid grease appears of a uniform nature it is allowed to cool. The lard is then washed. This is done in small quantities at a time, and is a work of much labor; which, however, is amply repaid by the result. About one pound of grease is placed on a slate slab, a little on the incline, a supply of good water being set to trickle over it. The surface of the grease is then constantly renewed by an operative working a muller over it, precisely as a color-maker grinds paints in oil. In this way the water removes any trac...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Dinner Time. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Dinner Time. Dinner time should bo at noon, as to the great masses of society. An unfortunate necessity may impel some business men in large cities to take dinners late in the afternoon, and some may follow the practice with apparent impunity, but the risk and responsibility are their own, and there it is left at least for the present. As a common thing persons cannot take into the stomach more food than will last six or seven hours; if more is taken, it cannot be acted upon to advantage by the stomach, nor can the person work well. Ordinary labor exhausts the strength contained in a common meal in the time specified. Persons may habituate themselves to flat more and work; but taking everything into account, families, consisting of old and young, of strong and weak, of robust and the sickly, will find it most convenient, as an average, to eat at about six hours interval; and this, with an early breakfast, brings the dinner at noon. The work since morn whets up the appetite for dinne...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Domestic Receipts. Farmer's Pudding.—Take one pint of bread crumbs, one quart of milk, half a cup of sugar, four eggs, taking only the yolks, butter the size of a walnut, one lemon, grated; bake until done, but not watery; then spread a layer of currant jelly or any preserved fruit over it. Take the whites of the eggs and sugar, in which has been stirred the juice of the lemon, beat to a stiff froth, pour it over the pudding and brown it. Serve cold with cream. It can be made without a lemon. Flavor with nutmeg. Mock Venison of Corned Beef.—Cut the beef in thin slices, and freshen by soaking for three or fonr hours in tepid water. When sufficiently fresh, lay the slices on a gridiron, and heat through quickly. Make a gravy of drawn butter; add a little pepper, and the yolk of an egg chopped fine, and pour over the meat; or butter, pepper and salt, like beefsteak. This will be found a savory dish when only salt meat can be procured, but it is better with fresh beef. Tomato Soup.—Take...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Mechanical Hints. Moistube in Woods.—According to Dr. Larsig's experiment, woods (trees) generally contain, during the winter monthß, an average of 50.7 per cent, of moisture; in March and April, about 45.9 per cent; in May, June and July, about 48 per cent; while up to the end of November the quantity of moisture increases but little. Airdried wood (lumber) contains from 20 to 25 per cent, of water, and never less than 10 per cent.—wood which,by being artificially dried, has been deprived of all moisture is thereby entirely altered as regards its cohesive length—it becomes brittle, loses its elasticity and flexibility. How to Make a Brick Oven. —Many a house-keeper, especially a farmer's wife, longs for a good old-fashioned brick oven, especially when there are several loaves of bread and a dozen pumpkin pies to bake at once. A brick oven built in the old style, out of doors, entirely separated from the dwelling house, is more safe, so far as danger from fire is concerned, than if ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LIFE THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

LIFE THOUGHTS. Beactifui/, very beautiful, can time, with goodness, make an old man look. Thebe are many things we can afford to forget, which it is well to learn. He is not only idle who does nothing, but he is idle who might be better employed. Conceit is to human nature what salt is to the ocean; it keeps it sweet and renders it endurable. "The way to true riches," said Plato, "is not to increase our heaps, but to diminish the covetousness of our hearts." There would be no evil speakers if there were no evil hearers. It is in scandal as in robbery —the receiver is as bad as the thief. No person ever got stung by hornets who kept away from where they were. It is so with bad habits. There is no computing how much real good is crushed out of the world by the gloomy and selfish spirit that withholds praise and open approval from those who deserve it. In the depths of the sea the waters are still, the heaviest grief is that borne in silence; the deepest love flows through the eye and ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Courage. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Courage. Courage is an indispensable necessity to fortitude. No coward can ever possess or exhibit it. But it contains another element even more essential —that of perseverance. He who is only brave may acaccomplish great and noble deeds, but the man of fortitude shows a continued bravery, an undying courage. He will resist and oppose evil of every kind not only with intrepidity, but with a steadfast persistence that never wearies, and will only cease when the work is accomplished and the evil conquered. Not only in attacking outward ills and adverse circumstances is the virtue of fortitude needed, but yet more in^conquering the faults of our own natures." No heroism is so great as that of sell-government. If we are progressive, we shall continually find enemies within our own breasts more difficult to contend with than any outside foes; —impulses to restrain, desires to check, passions to curb. All the elements of true fortitude are needed in this conflict, and no other success can...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Meteorological Observations. At Sacuamknto. Cat.., BY THOS. M. LOGAN M. D. Permanent Secretary of State Board of Health. Lat. *r Jl'4l" N., Lon>*. 12F29'44"W. HightatLever above moan low tide, at San FraneHeo. "4 feet. HiklH ot lowor surface of mercury, !M feet. The amount of cloudiucs- is de*icnat<-<1 hv figures, 10 heinß entire elondtaeaa; 8, half cloudiness; 0, entire clearness: and intermediate numbers in proportion. The force of the wind is also rPKisteroil in the same manner; 0 hcing a calm. 1 ft very liuht br.■»>/.>. and 10 a hurricane. The means are derived from three daily readmps at 7 a. m., 2 P. JC. and 9 P. *:., in uniformity w it" the arrangements of the Smithsonian Institute. •ThorinometoKrajih. tßain. Rkmauks.- With the nceeptfoa of another brief heated term on the lfith, which was soon interrupted by a sudden change of wind from N. to S. E., the weather during the, week has been all thai could be desired. The met...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Right and Left. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Right and Left. Eos. Press:—ln a late number of the Press, I noticed an interesting article with. this title, and with a pretty full discussion of the subject. The lecturer was entirely right, as it seems to me, in the view of the case which he took, viz:—that the tendency of the body was toward tlie right; and not^ as the correspondent stated, to the left. Now if the writer of that article would take the trouble to experiment a little on the mutter in hand, w© think he might come to see differently. We have tried it practically and find that the results go to strengthen this opinion. It is done in this manner: When walking with a friond one day, I requested him, without telling him my object in so doing, to place himself in line with two fixed objects, a tree and a post, and, having done so, with his >ys thut, to endeavor to come as neur the post us he could. He did so, and I watched him closely. The experiment was repeated several times, and then I did the same thing my...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Eighteenth Annual Fair of the CALIFORNIA State Agricultural Society, [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Eighteenth Annual Fair of the CALIFORNIA State Agricultural Society, To commence on the 18th ami end on the 2.1 dof September, 1871, at SACRAMENTO CITY. OVER $20,000 APPROPRIATED FOR PREMIUMS! Literal SPECIAL PREMIUMS for all worthy articles exhibited, not mentioned in the Schedule Also, in addition to the Premiums named, the Society will give a GOLD MEDAL to the most Meritorious Exhibition in each of the HTM departments. The Pavilion will be open for the reception of Article* for Exhibition on Friday and Saturday, September 10th and loth, 1871. LIST OP PKEMIUMS, Open to all the States and Territories. FIRST DEPARTMENT. LIVE STOCK. HORSES. In this department the name animal cannot be entered more than once, except in Bweepstakes, or ah a colt with its sire or dam, as a member of a family. No animal will be allowed to compete for a premium unless free from disease or blemish which can bo transmitted to posterity. CLASS I-THOROCGHBRED HORSES. In this class none will bo permitted to co...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 398 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Thoroughbred Cotswold Sheep. COTSWOLD KINO. IMPORTED FROM THK FLOCKB of Lane, Game At Fletcher, England, and 3. D. Wing, of New York, with their grades half and thiee-quarter breeds. REFERENCES.—Secretary of State Agricultural Society, who says: "Your Cotnwold and Merino grade rams (recommended by himself to parties in Sacramento) give entire satisfaction since they have seen the result ofthecroßB." A. Lovell, of Millerton, and Charles Peck, of Snelling, with others from different parts of the State, say, in regard to their cross with Merino sheep: " Have more and larger lamb*, with better staple wool than ever before." Win. O Brine, of S;m Francisco, purchased all of our quarter Cots wold lambs at f J per head on our rancho. Christy* rtise sold thirty-nine bales of our grade wool at thirty-two cent* per pound, for six months clip. l,;< 00 Spring Lambs, shears in May, averaged 2*» lbs. of wool per head. Below, tiud statement of wool scoured by me for the New York State Sh...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 398 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Farmers and Teamsters, SATE YOUR MONEY! BY USING TUB Patent Wood Horse Collars and Hames Combined, Which has ninny advantages over the Leather Stuffed with Straw. Ist. Durability, lasting at least ten times as long. 2d Convenience. Opening below, can be laid on and off the Horse, having one fastening in place of two or three. „ , , 3d. Is one-third lighter than leather collar and hame. 4th. Can be easily fitted, as it is so constructed that the length and width can be changed in a few minutes. 6th. as there are no stitches to break, or stuffing to press out, it never loses its shape, always bearing upon the muscular part of the shoulder, near the Met— the proper place for draft. 6th. Its smooth, hard surface, giving equal pressure on the whole line of draft, never sweats ob bubs off THE HAIR. 7th. It has an important advantage in the stationary curved arch, keeping the collar fbom setting tight around the top OF THE nub when heavy tongues have to be carried (as in some machines), th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 398 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Patented Articles for Agents. Longshore's Combination Tool. This device is Just what its name indicates. As a Kitchen Tool it is tndispensibla It will fit ami lilt with perfect safety, any Stove Lid, Frying Pan, Pie Pan, Pot Kettle, or any other vessel or dish used about a stove. It is a complete tool for stretching carpets, driving tacks, pulling tacks, ko., &c It answers the double purpose ot hammer and pincers, and is also a good Nut Cracker. It is made of the best malleable iron, and the Hammer, Pincers and tack puller, are all hardened so as to stand the roughest usage. An Agent is wanted in every town on the Pacific Coast to sell this valuable little implement. Ketnil price fifty cents. Richards' Corner Protector. This is a novel and beautiful invention. It completely prevents dust from settling in the corners of rooms or fairways, and at the same time makes a very tine finish. They sell very readily. Stud 50 cents for samples. Finger Guards. No lady who Sews can a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 398 Advertisements Column 4 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

FIRST PREMIUM AWARDED at the State Fair, 1870, for the bwt Farm Wagon: also for the best improved Thimble Skein. All kpids of Wagons on hand and iiiutlr to order, of the Kent Euutern Material, and Warranted to give satisfaction. E. SOULE, Corner Eleventh and I streets, oi>22-3m Baciumknto, Cal. BAKER & HAMILTON, IMFOKTEIM OF Hardware, Farming Implements, MACHINES, ETC. THE EXCELSIOR MOWER. Arc Sole Agents for IXOXLSIOR MOWICR AND BBAPXR, CHAMPION MOWER AND REAPER, Bl HKKS EAGLE MOWER AND REAPER. Xi:\V YORK MOWER AND REAPER, Haines 1 Genuine Illinois Harvester, Pitts' Improved California Thresher, Portable Steam Engrines, Etc., Witli a full stock < f all kinds of implements needed in Farming. Send for List of Prices. THE CHAMPION SELF RAKE REAPER. 9, 11, 13 and 15 J street, SACRAMENTO. 13, 15, 17 and li> Front Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 17-vl-3m McLURES PATENT CHURN. Patented May 17, 1870. llus taken the premium at all the State Faint East of ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 399 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

•■-*■ IV Ti-rarTCT BESTI i^su7%f%^fA%/ycr\rYy ®fSELFRAKINI}?EApE rUNUFAcfiiREb BT ADRIANCe)IATT&CO STYLES, SIZES & PRICES TO SUIT ALL FARMERS. Dojcrtptfva Circulars Forwarded by MalL MARCUS C. HAWLEY & CO., Agents, 108 Si 110 Front Street, San Francisco, Cal. GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES OF MACHINES AND EXTRAS FOR 1871. The Buckeye is the BEST MOWER NOW IN USE. As a Reaper, We guarantee it superior to any SELF-RAKING REAPER yet invented. Sole Agents for the Celebrated H>veopstttlces Thresher. Also, Sole Agents for GENUINE HAINES' HEADER, HOLLINGSWORTH WHEEL-HORSE RAKES, BURDICK'S NATIONAL FEED-CUTTER. Wo have also WOOD'S MOWER, KIRBY MOWER and REAPERS. Also, Extras for the abovo, with a full fetock of Agricultural Implements and Hardware. MARCUS C. HAWLEY & CO, 108 and 110 Front street, and Nos. 10 and 12 Pine street, up'2'2-3m Ban Francisco. THE STUDEBAKER WAGOIV. TIIK BEST FARM WAGON; THE BEST RANCH WAGON; THE BEST TRUCK WAGO...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 399 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

BOONE'S C-SPRING ROLLER SKATE. PATENT GRANTED. This SKATE surpasses [in Elasticity, Durability'and Ease of Operation, any other Skate in existence. Its superiority has be»n proved wherever it has come in competition with any other Roller Skate. FOR DESCRIPTION SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR. Warranted to run longer without requiring to be repaired than any other Skate. Owners of Rinks will find it the most profitable as well as the most satisfactory to their patrons. The patentees guarantee the right to run this Skate to purchasers of rights for the full term of the patent, and Warrant it to be no Infringement on any Existing Patent. State, County, Town and Rink Rights for sale at reasonable terms. Apply by letter or in person to UNDERHILL BOYNTON, 105 Montgomery Street, S. F., Cal., General Agent for the United States. The World Mower and Reaper. IT HAS .NO EQUAL. IT MOWS-IT DROPS-IT SELF-BAKES! This Machine is the harvest-gathering of twenty years' experience in the manufacture of ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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