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Elephind.com contains 2,951 items from Wide West, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,951 results
In and Out-Door Air. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

In and Out-Door Air. If a small portion of the air of a crowded room is made to pa-.- up through distilled water, a sediment i- h it. which contains various colored fibres of clothing, and |M»rtions of hair, wool, hits of human skin, or scales, with a kind of fungus grnwth. wilh its particles of rvpriMlucti.ni. which MMN wliereier they strike at lull on wet surfaces ,or bruisos, or -..re places, and grow whereevcr they adhere ; there i- al-o a small amount of -and and dirt, with great numliers of the various forms of animal life. No wonder, then, that the blood is soon tainted and corrupted by making sittiug a|iartments of our chambers, by s|iending hours in crowded assemblies, or stage coaches, or railroad ears, when- evcrv breath we draw is a mouthful of monster life. Hut if that room Ik- emptied for a few hours, and a |>ortiou of its atmosphere bo treated in the same way. nothing will be found but a little sand and dirt, a few fibres of wool und cotton, only a trace of...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cold [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Cold For every mile tluit we leave the surfa'-c of our earth, the tcm|>ei uture falls live degrees. At fortvlive miles distance from the globe, we get beyond the atmosphere, and enter, strictly speaking, into the regions of space whose tem|ierature is two hundred and twenty live degrees below zero ; and here cold reigns in all its power. Some idea of this intense cold may be formed by stating that the greatest cold in the Arctic Circles from forty to sixty degrees below zero ; aud here many surprising ( fleets are produced. Iv the chemical laboratory, the greatest cold that we can produce is about one hundred and fifty degrees below zero. At this temjierature carbonic gas becomes a solid suii-tance. like snow. If touched, it produces just the same effect ou the skin as a red hot cinder ; it blisters the lingers, like a burn. Quicksilver or mercury freezes at forty degrees below zero ; that is. seventy-two degrees below the temjierature at which water freezes. This solid m...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"Catching" Jewelry. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

"Catching" Jewelry. The Kmpress Kugenie seems to be a capital hand at whiting away her own and other people's time, when residing at obscure watering places, where the accustomed resources of royal gaiety are at fault. One game that she invented, aiid which gives much delight, was this : A costly jewel is placed upon a saucer, and covered with an inverted teacup; a lady then tosses them to a gentleman seated on the opposite side of the room, and if he catches the Hying utensils with such a steady hand that the jewel is not displaced from under the cup, the gem becomes the projierty of the lady. Of course, the gallant who is to "catch" feels an intense solicitude, inasmuch as the prize for the lady which his adroitness may gain or his awkwardness lose, has a value which renders its possession exceedingly desirable, and makes its loss acutely felt. It is said that the Emperor is the best " catcher ' of them all; and when he is present the game is played with an enthusiasm which would ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Putrid Sore Throat. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Putrid Sore Throat. A correspondent, writing trom % olcano, Amador county, furnishes tbe following receipt for cases of putrid sore throat, which is said to be an infallible cure: " Take two teaspoonsful of cayenne pepper, one tcaspoonful of salt, to half a pint of boiling water ; let it stand one hour, then add half a pint of warm vinegar. Dose—one tablespooiiful every hour, i and use as a gargle."

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Force of Repetition. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Force of Repetition. The reiterating process of literature is just the reverse ol what is known as the t'lesarian operation in surgery. It aims to strengthen the language by re|ietition, as in this verse of the wellknown song: " My love is like the red, red rose." How the repetition of the adjective intensifies the idea, beautifies the language, and converts into poetry what would otherwise have all the flavor and the toughness of prose ! Besides, to say, " Sly love is like the red ruse," is not only prosaic, but docs not impart that sanguineous idea which was evidently intended. A red rose may mean one of the common cabbage province variety ; but a red-red rose is evidently something of a deeper tint, a brilliant crimson or bright scarlet. We have nothing to say in favor of the poet's choice, supposing the red-red to apply to his love's hair, or eyes, or even nose. In fact, any part of her except her lips we should rather not Bare red rmi ; but then tastes differ, aud we are not di...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Blessing Unknown to the Ancients. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

A Blessing Unknown to the Ancients. There is. we believe, but little that is definitely know n as to the mode in which diseases are COBB municated. Therefore, all unnecessary contact or contiguity had lictter Ih- avoided, es|>cciallv by unprofessional parsWßßi It may bo by inhalation af effluvium or inlectcd air. the morbid particles being thus brought in contact with the Mood in tlie pulmonary circulation, which would in effect be a kind of inuoculatiun. The non-recurrence, generally s|>eaking. of the more virulent diseases in the same aabjeet, is assuredly a merciful dis|iensalion. and is very likely connected with the security afforded by cow pock virus against what is called assail pcs iv the human suliject. The way in which Or. Jeaaattr discovered the eflbctof vaccination.and literally changed •■ the face" of society—for it is now a rarity to see a face marred with the small-pox-is generally knowu : but as an example of the value of facts to found a theory...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How People Take Cold. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

How People Take Cold. The time for tuking cold is alter your exercise : the place is in your own house or ofiitv. It is not the act of exercise which gives the cold ; but it is the getting cool too quick after exercising. For example, you walk very fast to get to the railroad station, or to catch an omnibus, or to make lime for an appointment; your mind ahead ot you, the hear* makes an over effort to keep up with'it ; and wh(U yen get to the desired spot, you raise your hat and find yourself in a |XI apU alius: You take a seat, and feeling quite comfortable as to tem|>erature. you begin to talk to a Iriend. or to read a newspaper ; and before you are aware of it. you ex]ierience a sensation Of chi II uc-s. ami the thing is done. After any kind ol exercise, do not stand a moment ut a street corner for anybody or anything: Bar at any open door or window. When you have beea exercising in any way whatever, w inter or summer, go home at once, or to some •heltcred place ; and h...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Washing Clothes. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Washing Clothes. A corres|K>ndent of the Country Gentleman gives the following receipt; ■ " 1 have uscil for several years a washing fluid, which very much lessens the labor of washing, without injuring the clothes in the least. It is made as follows—Take, for one gallon of water, oue pound of washing soda, and one quarter of a lound of unslackcd lime. Put them in the water, mil simmer twenty minutes. When cool, |>our off die clear fluid into glass or stoneware, for it will uin earthenware, causing it lo crack until it falls lo pieces. " If the clothes are very dirty, put them in soak over night ; wring them out iv the morning ; soap them, and put them in the wash-kettle, with -nough water to cover them. To a common-sized ■cattle or boiler full, pet a teacupful of fluid. Boil half an hour, then wash well through one suds, aud rinse thoroughly in two waters. Those careful housewives who have always washed their clothes twice, then boiled them, and then washed th...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wood Gas. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Wood Gas. A simple and economical wood gas apparatus has been invented, consisting of a small furnace. • , ith a retort uiaeed over the fire. Tbe gas is produced from pine and other resinous woods, small blocks of which are placedoa a shell within the • etort. The act ion of the heat causes the resinous .iroducts of the wood to melt, and, escaping from ihe pores, they slowly drip down iqiou the bottom ..f the retort, where the heat is more intense, and by which they are converted into carburetted hvIrogen gas. The gas there formed then goes through a slight purification, when it is ready for burning. The substance kept in the retort, after producing the gas, is charcoal of a very superior quality.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Curious Mode of Silvering Ivory. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Curious Mode of Silvering Ivory. Immerse a small slip of ivory in a weak solution of nitrate of silver, and let it remain till the solution has given it a deep yellow color ; then take it out and immerse it in a tumbk,- of clear water, and expose it in the water to the rays of the sun. In about three hours the ivory acquires a black color ; but. the black surface, on beiug rubbed, soon becomes changed to a brilliant silver.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Magical Mango. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

The Magical Mango. Everybody has heard of the Indian juggler's trick of producing a young mango tree from a seed •kith he takes from his hag, and submits to your examination. The seed is sound, anil fit for planting. The juggler collects a quantity ol earth, moistens it with water, and taking a mango-stone from his bag. plants it in the earth he has prepared. Over all, he places a nwdorate-sized round basket, upon which he spreads his cloth or a native blanket. After au interval of discordant music and incantation, the cloth aud basket are removed, the muddy seed is taken from the earth, and you observe that long, slender, white fibres, forming the root, have suddenly shot out. Again it is planted, and covered as before, and the music becomes more discordant, and the incantation more furious. At length the charm is complete, and the removal of the basket displays a young and tender shoot, with two opening leaves at its summit. Exclamations of surprise from the bystanders, and satisf...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Game of the Fox—Trap for Pigeons. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

A Game of the Fox—Trap for Pigeons. The late news from Kurope contains, among other items of po.itical interest, the rumor that the Kmperor Napoleon is laboring severely from a disease of the lungs j and some more venturesome letter-writer has absolutely predicted his speedy demise. The Bed Bepubficans, anticipating the death of the usurper, by natural causes or from violent means, have long arranged an insurrectionary scheme to follow any coup d'etat, or state occurrence. In spite of the vigilance of the police, a few only of the members of the Marianne have as yet beeu denounced and captured, and those only of the lowest class of conspirators, who appear to have offered themselves as martyrs to the great cause of Eaaopeaa republicanism, well aware that, in the event, of a successful upraising, their shackles will be stricken off' aud their brows crowned by mural coronets. But if the subordinates have been detected, it is certain that the leaders have not ; and it is now believed t...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Coffee a Deodorizer. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Coffee a Deodorizer. Now that the " game season" has again come in, we beg to remind sportsmen t nd others that fresh ground coffee is a perfect and safe deodorizer —a sprinkling will keep game fresh and sweet for several days. Clean your game—that is, wipe off the blood—cover the wounded parts with absorbent paper, wrap up the heads, and then aft inkle ground coffee over aud among the feathers or fur, as the case may be, pack up carefully, and the game will be preserved fresh and sweet in the most unfavorable weather. Game sent open and loose, cannot, of course, be treated in this manner, but all game packed in boxes or hampers may be deodorized as described. A teaspooiiful of coffee is enough for a brace of birds, and in this proportion for more or larger game. Fresh ground coffee may be used with advantage in a sick room ; a few spoonsful spread and exposed on a plate, burnt by a red-hot iron, is a safe aud pleasant fumigator.

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cool. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Cool. While at Windsor I took cold, and was laid up with a fever. 1 had been in bed three duvs, when my landledy came into my room. " Well, Captain, how do you find yourself by this time?" '• Oh. 1 am a little better, thunk you." I replied. " Well, 1 am glad of it. because 1 went to whitewash your room, and if the oolorßUUi stops to do it to-morrow he il I* charging us another quarter of a dollar." '• But 1 am not able to leave my room." " Well, then. I'll speak to him ; 1 dare say he iron'l mnul your- being "» bed while he whiteweuhet.'"

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

SCHOOL BOOKS. Noisy Carrier's Book and Stationery Co., INVITE THE ATTENTION OF SCHOOL TEACHERS, Scholars, and Dealers, to their assortment on hand and constant supply of all the favorite series of school books in use. READERS, SPELLERS, PRIMERS, DICTIONARIES, GRAMMARS. GEOGRAPHIES, ARITHMETICS, MATHEMATICS, ALGEBRA, GEOMETRY, HISTORY. RHETORIC, PHILOSOPHY, CHEMISTRY, BOTANY, GEOLOGY, ASTRONOMY, HYGIENE, ELOCUTION, COMPOSITION, BOOK-KEEPING, Ac, Ac., Ac, Ac. The Noisy Carrier's Book and Stationery Co., HAVE CONSTANTLY ON HAND A COMPLETE ASSORTmentof the above. SPELLERS. Sanders's Webster's Town's, McGuffey's. READERS, Sanders's Ist, Sd, 3d, 4th, and nth, Town's " " " " " " McGuffey's " » " « " Swan's " " " " » » ENGLISH GRAMMARS, Smith's Kirkham's, Weld's Bullion's. —also— Andrews and Stoddard's Latin Grammar, Quackenbos's Lessons in English Composition, Elements of Geology, Newman's Rhetorio, Porter's Rhetorical Reader, Northend's American Speaker, Zacho's American Speaker. ARITHMET...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Utah and Polygamy. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

Utah and Polygamy. The most perilous periods of the history ol the United States of America have been invariably those in which additions have been made to the great family of the Union and the only instances in which their integrity and unity have been seriously threatened are found in the discussion of the issues incident to the admission of new members of the confederacy. Heretofore, the qacstioa of slavery has been the only one involved in these unfortunate difficulties, but BOW an instance seems likely to arise involving a new principle, and calculated to determine in its settlement the relation which the religious element of our social condition bears to its political character—to decide how lar a moral and theological influence may enter into the determination of our system of national domestic polity. The question in its present shape is as perplexing as it is important ; and while its settlement cannot but be attended with excitement and prejudice, it cannot l>e ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Kxaatrfated Patriot*. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

The Kxaatrfated Patriot*. Two more of the grateful recipients of Vigilance Committee action hare- instituted suits for damages against the officers of that body in New York, and one of the complaints includes the names of the entire Executive Committee. The names of these worthies are familiar among us as " household words." Tbey are, Charles P. Duane and Billy Mulligan. It is amusing to read the detailed complaints of these victims of popular persecution, and comical to note their names attached to documents which neither has the capacity to comprehend, and three of the simplest sentences of which would be beyond their acquirements in the art of English composition. It is a pity that the fac-similes of the signatures of these injured individuals could not be published with the documents themselves, in order to add to the air of respectability with which they are invested. They would then be worthy of preservation by others than those lawyers who are now placing them on file as mode...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Right of Property in the Routes of Newspaper Carriers. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

The Right of Property in the Routes of Newspaper Carriers. Messrs. Editors:—l Living observed that the price for carriers' routes in this city, when they are sold, is a Terr high one in proportion to thut demanded Tor routes on papers in the Eastern cities, I make bold to inquire whether there is any law or legal decision which renders the carrier any more secure in the possession of his route (or right to serve subscribers in any particular district) here than elsewhere? As Ex-Carrier. There is certainly no law in this State that gives a carrier any right of property in his route, which the publisher ofa paper may not nullify by refusing to furnish him with copies of the journal he has been in the habit of serving to subscriliers, and we know of no decision having beeu given on tbe subject. The high prices which have at times been paid for routes in this city on particular newspapers has frequently excited our surprise. In the ordinary manner in which routes are sold by one carrier...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Police in Uniform. [Newspaper Article] — Wide West — 16 November 1856

The Police in Uniform. With the inauguration of the new city government has been revived the question of a uniform for policemen. The enactment imposing this regulation has been a dead letter during the existence of the weak, corrupt administration which has just drawn to a close, and it would be a very proper step for tbe new authorities to begin their work by a rigid enforcement of this much-needed regulation. There are a variety of reasons why the police should be in uniform, and no really good ones why they should not. The objections urged, mainly on the part of policemen themselves, that the uniform partakes of the character of a livery, that to wear it is a degradation, are simply alisurd, and grow out of a ridiculous vanity which should be rebuked. A policeman who is ashamed that his dress should declare him such, is not fit for that responsible position. If there is nothing discreditable in licing a policeman, there is nothing disreputable in wearing the police uniform. The ...

Publication Title: Wide West
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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