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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Quite Correct. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

Quite Correct. He was one of those inquisitive, loquacious strangers who, not con tent with telling you of all their doings and achievements, insist on learning all your secrets. And poor .Tones found Himself alone with the man in the com partment of a railway train which ran without a stop from Crewe to London. Having asked countless questions concerning his fellow-traveller's busi ness and the object of his journey, the stranger began to make inquiry about his family. " Well, if you really want to know," snid the exasperated Jones, "I'll tell you. I have a wifo and five children, but I'vo never seen one of them." "Never seen one of them ?" bogan the stranger. "But—but " "I U»U you I'vo never seen one of them," repeated .Jones. "I've been away from home for a week, and my youngest kiddie was born yes terday." A man rang the hell at Willie Budd's house one day. and Willie, aged eight, answered it. " Is Mr. Iludd in?" said the limn. "I'm Mr. IJudri," said Willie, "or do you want to s...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. TRIAL OF THE DORSETSHIRE LABORERS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

PEN PICTURES OF THE PAST. TRIAL or THJB DORSETSHIRE LABORERS. The first important epoch in the history of modern British labour politics was tho formation, in 1834-, of the Grand National Consolidated Trades Union, a really important association, numbering ob it did half a million adherents, who represented every branch of labour, including agriculture. Even women's unions wero affiliated. The tremendous possibilities of such a -initel Ivdy of workers naturally aroused tho attention of the governing classes, and a prosecution was instituted for "unlawful conspiracy," of which tho most saliont incident is that of tho Dorchester labourers. At. this period, when the average wage of tho English farmhand was 10s. a week, tho Dorset laborers re ceived 7s. Half u dozen of such men, Methodists and local preachers, started a "Grand Lortgo of the Na tional Friendly Society of Agri cultural ^Labourers" nt Tolpuddlc (Dorsetshire). Soma farmers insti tuted a prosecution for "conspl racy/' The fa...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
When Walking is Hard Work. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

When Walking is Hard Work. People often express surprisa that soldiers on (ha march covor only ten or twelvo miles of ground per day. Even then a gooil ninny men fall out through fatigue, some fnlnt, and the whole are. completely dono up at tho end of the day. But the soldier is, nevertheless, a first-rate walker. It is nil a mat ter of foot-tons of energy expend ed. Take an ordinary laborer, and his day's ' work will bo equal to 300 tons lifted ono foot high. An eleven-stone mnn, wnlking seventeen miles on tho level, does the snmo amount of musclo work. Hut mark, it ho carries an overcoat weighing Gib., ho does !S11 foot tons. Now, tho soldier is a regular pnek-horso, and the kit that ho enr ries averages about 601b. in weight. So that I10 does exactly as much work in a twelve-mile march ns nn ordinnry man in his seventeen-mile walk. Resides, the soldier has to "break camp" before starting, and at the finish of tho march he lins to pitch camp, draw water, collect fuel, clean rifles...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Rare British Moth. ENTOMOLOGISTS AND THE THOMPSONI. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

Rare British Moth. ENTOMOLOGISTS AND THE THOMPSON!-. This moth, which is a striking example of the ruriou* colour variation common among insects, linla, nnd animals, is a special ob ject ot interest t«j entomologists, in view of the recent discovery of a new nnd third variety by Mr. J. Thompson, a Chester entomologist. •This form of the insect appears at present to bo confined to Dela niore Forest, Cheshire, and is very rave. It is named Thompson!, nfter its discoverer, nnd is black, with a conspicuous whito border to its wings. Jn its second variety the moth exhibits the first culminating stage of variation, and is black, with grey wing fringes, a chango to a darker huo from tho common or ordinary type. Tho second variety, if which we al so glvo an illustration, is named Hobsoni, of Hartlepool. Neither of these varieties, howevor, is an abrupt transition, for between the typical insoct and each of them aro var ious intermediate forms. From '1HE THOMPSON!, THE UAU10 BIUTJSH MOTU WHI...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Latest in Flying. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

The Latest in Flying. 1 I The authors, Mr. Gustav Hamel and Mr. Charles U. Tumor, tell enthusiastic talcs of some of their practical experiences, and at tho same lime give many useful hints to tho budding uvintor. Witness tho I following extracts : i "To everyone who has done much flying across country must comc 1 tho memories of scenes that mnkc it diflicult for him to understand why the lure of the air is not felt by alt the world. Over Versailles ut sunrise, the great wooded slopes, the winding Seine, Paris in u blur of mist, its only visible feature the Kiflfcl Tower silhouetted against the red disc of tho sun, mako an im pression never to ho removed ; ahead and far below, like a black limpet among tangled weeds, Mont Valerien, a landmark for its aerial tourist." "In his first attempts at a cork screw descent the pilot should pro ceed very cautiously. The first es sential to climb to n good height, nml then practice steeply-banted downward turns through half cir cles. gradually ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The "Commercial" in an Indian Bazaar. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

The "Commercial" in an Indian Bazaar. popular conception or India Is ol necessity bused on what illustrated j papers dish up for us, and ns thoy ycem to prefer in the main some of l lie imposing buildings and streets hi tlie liuropenn quarters of Horn-1 Imy and Calcutta, varied occasion-' „lie with views of the famous show-! places, such ns tho Taj nt Agr*, | ,ir some notnblB llosque or Tem- i pie, with which tho country abounds, wo naturally think of India on the Mime broad lines as the picturos visualise for us. Put this is not the real India ; to i j-ct (o its heart you must leave i i In- broad streets of European com merce, and dive into its bazaars, ulii're the teeming millions of na nus still live lo-dny exactly as ihiy did hundreds of years ago, and -,s tlioy will, in all likelihood, be hitiml hundreds of yonrs hence, for llie placid fatalism of linstcrn tem perament abhors change and innova-1 linn, and calmly defies all the laws nf hygiene and sanitation by lierd jntr togeth...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SAVED BY HER SKIRT. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

SAVKD BY HEU SKIU'I'.-.V T|mt the hobble skirt bus its uses u as shown at ritssburg recently, when Miss Criice Stewart, ,n young woninn of «as save.! from drowning by Hie buoyant qualities of a tight skirt inllateil by air. .Miss Stewnrt attempted, to commit suiiide bv throw iui: hertit'lf from the V'uilt.hlit'bi 'lli-idge into the Monon .'iiliela Hher. I» I" doseeut. liow the rush of air inflated her s'.irl and the tif-'litness of the lower port ' acted as an admirable retain in,; valve, with the result that she onlv sank half her length, and then remained afloat. The young woman was rescued by n boatman who Imd hurried to her assistance.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Ether of Space. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

The Ether of Space. Sir Oliver Lodge delivered n lec ture at Hertford College, the other day, on the "Ether of Space." He; stated that "his was not sure" I nbout the ether being cohesive or not. Mr. G. T. How ley now writes :—"I would like to project the theory that ether beyond the boundary of our gaseous atmosphere j can be no other thud cohesive, be- J cause it is certain that there arc no gases or dust, or vapour, of any description to suparnto the parti-1 clcs of ether in the unfathomable space. Therefore it must be pure, and, being pure, must essentially be cohesive. Not so where it abounds in our atmosphere, for the molecules of oxygen and hydrogen, together with the other gases, being con stantly changed by the climatic influences, interfere with tho cohes- i ion of ether. It might, be said of j the ^inexplicable nature of radium,' thut it is n substance which dis agrees with the particles of ether I coming into contact, with its sur face, and throws - them off again, I maki...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Snow in Southern Climes. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

Snow in Southern Climes. The Old Year ended and the New Year came in with severe snow-' .storms in ninny parts of the world. To sny nothing of Britain, Berlin, as well us other parts of Gernmny, experienced the heaviest snowstorm recorded for over-a century. With the exception 'of the niotor-'bus, traN fie of all klmls was hold up, and in places the snow reached a depth of two feet. Berlin is on. about the. saiue latitude . as Yarmouth. What, then, must we think of the heavy snowstorm in Algiers ? There, in ,a country which borders on the hot African deserts, and one In which snow is. seldom seen, the snow lay so deep upon the roads that Mr. Lloyd George's motor-car was- held up, and he and his companions luul to get on to Constantino by special train. The general theory that the North of Kurope is cold in win ter and the South warm is subject to many, exceptions. During a part of the timo we are speaking of. Ice land was not only warmer thnn Bri J tain, but than Snn Sebastian, in •...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NOT FAIR. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

NOT 1" A lit. A little Rill had heen l<> church for the first time. °» rcturmnp home, her mother asked her w w she thought of churi-h. "] liked it very iiukIi." she plied ; "but there was one tiling didn'l think was fnir." "What was that, dear?" nskcdn, uiothor. • "Whv, one nmn did all the l»B. nntl then nnothcr nmn round and got nil the n»one>.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
To Clean Copper Vessels. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

To Clean Copper Vessels. 3. Copper vessels, such as tea urns, etc., are often superficially coated with bronze ; it gives them an agreeable appearance, and pre vents tarnish. To accomplish this the copjku' must be perfectly clean ed, by washing oft all grease, etc., by a hot solution of caustic pot ash, well rinsing in water, cleaning the surface of all oxide hv nitric | acid, nnd rinsing again. ' This be ing done. proceed ns follows :•* ! Two parts of verdigris and one part of chloride of ammonia are dissol I ved in vinegar ; the solution is boil ! ed in a porcelain vessel, skimmed, nnd diluted with water till it only tastes slightly of copper, and ceases to deposit a white precipitate. Jt is then poured into a copper pan and rapidly brought to boil. The art iclc is then brushed over with the -W.Umk - ouluUunv -\n-rr\l~-\Mv-«»~ tide can be boiled in the ^solution for a few minutes, so much the hotter. (It is better .Hint' the pro cess should be too slowly than too rapidly effected....

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHEAP IN IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

CI I ISA I' IN' llfKI.AND. Aii Englishman travelling < in"'*. Ireland went into u resUun.nt. whore lie ordered some l'*"' finishii'iK the mei.l 1»' i"<l«'l('d ' price, mid oil heini? told. '""'p" ed of its beiiiK so dreadfully m • "Why, in England," sn"1 hl; „ can K<* fish for iitllo or »oth,"K b l'at, who had I'M" stl ,lnf...,.n Ii«telling to tlic ar«ument hen _ the waiter and Engltohnmn, canio up to him and said , r -W-l. if. cheaper i" ever it was in England. • ^ people liero nr* cleaning •• dows with whitir.c. It's tlm

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Reason Alpine Climbers Go to Pieces. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

Reason Alpine Climbers Go to Pieces. f M. Vnllot and M. llnyeux have I presented to the Academic des t .Sciences an interesting communica tion concerning the relations of muscular exercises' to altitude. They I made use of a squirrel confined in I n rotary cage, and were able to de | terniinc that the animal at * he sea i level made 0,700 turns of the , wheel' a day. After thin fact, had ! been established by repeated obser vixtions the animal was taken in his 'cage to the summit of .Mont Illanc, [at which altitude it inndc only 000 turns a day. When brought down to the plain it made .">,000. This experiment clearly shows that the fatigue felt, on muscular work by Alpinists is not solely due to the exertions of climbing, even though , they take a considerable part in it. As a matter of fact, say the Paris correspondent of the 'Lancet' in commenting on the facts, the person or animal transported with out fatigue to the summit finds him self in a medium in which the rarefaction of ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. EFFECT OF DRAINING ON THE SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

the farm. m'ECT 01'" WAININU ON THR M 1 untf.. The most important result is that | if makes the soil wnrmer. A wet sliil is rijlfl, chiefly because the water i" il iw constantly ovnporat mill evaporation is n cooling niorcss. 'J'o illustrate this : If tho '.nib of one thermometer is covered villi wet muslin, and the bulb of nnothcr similar thermometer is left uncovered," the wet thermometer mny register as niticli as l*!i degrees cooler when both nrc swung in dry n|r. This is duo to tlie cooling ef fect of the evaporation of the water. Moreover, water is a poor conduc ior of hent ; wet soils miriri in the s in .slowly, because the water they contain holds down the temperaturc. There is usually n dilTeronce of 5 lo J" degrees between drained and imdrnincd soil in the Bnmo field. | in furl, the temperature of a soil in summer is very largely determin- I Hl liy the amount of wulc it con- | tains ; the wetter it is the colder it i i.s. tVn'mfh is one of the chief I ifs nlials for the ge...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Desperate Remedy. WILLIE SMITH AND HIS FRIEND ATTEMPT TO CUBE A COLD. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

A Desperate Remedy. WILLIE SMITH AND HIS FRIEND ATTEMPT TO CUBE A COLD. "Guess what, my pa's got 7" In vited Willie. - | •'Parish relief !" was the reply, of. Carrots. Willie turned away in offence, anrl J stalked with dignity back to his< front door. "Ere i" called Carrots, a prey to curiosity. "Joking apart, what's up with the old josser ?" "He's got influenza," said Willie, relenting. "Got a cold, 'oz 'e 7" replied Carrots. "Well, 'e ain't the inven tor * of 'era, is 'o 7" "Ah, but you never heard n cold like his," declared Willie. "It's n regular snorter." ' Oh, 'ush !" begged Carrots primly, "Vou know your ma don't like you to talk slang." "I mean that he snorts, .that's all," explained Willie. "He!s done all he enn to' cure his cold. One friend told him to have a cold bath and go to bed." "Got that. tired feeling, 'as 'e ?" queried Carrots. "Feels as if 'e'd got no further interest in life— ch 7" THE COST OF A CURE. "He says he'd give a million pounds to be cured," ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARCONI MAGIC. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

MARCONI MAGIC. I Mr. Marconi announces that he can light a lamp six miles away by wire less. The bulb of the lamp was at tached to a wireless receiver connect ed in its turn with a receiving aerial wire. At the other point of the ex periment a transmitter in space was linked up with a power of 100-h.p. As soon as the power was applied the bulb six miles away was lighted up, and remained alight so lone as the power was kept on. This experiment Mr. Marconi hopes may be a forerunner of the use though not, perhaps, in our day—of wireless power for ligoting and heat ing houses. "At present," he said, "the first call is to push on with wireless telephony. I am now aimin; particularly at obtaining a distinctly audible message, which is really more valuable than 'spectacular' calls over long distances. "I have been able to commuuioati quite easily and clearly at 100 miles distance, using ordinary receivers nnd an apparatus VCry much lik3 the usual telephone. The difficulty liw with the tran...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Gals and Buoys. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

Gals and Buoys. The thin little man wearing peb ble glasses and-brown canvas shoes stood near the bathing machines and eased himself of a series of chest notes that would have made an opera basso squirm with envy. "Bravo, Liza !" he bellowed, look ing out to sea, "You're teachin' >m jest 'ow ter do it. There ain't oo ropc-holdin' and screechin' about you. Keep *your 'ead under, old gal ; you're a-doing it All" He gave his lungs and vocal chords Jull play for some time, then traces o( anxiety appeared on his face. "1 suppose my missus's 'eatl can't by any means *ave got stuck in the mud ?" he inquired of the machine proprietor, as ho jerked his thumb in the direction of a round, brown object. "She's 'ad it under water this last ten minutes." "If your missus is the party wot 'ad the houtsizc costume, she's out o' the water and listenin' to the niggers," camc the reply. " Wot you're lookin' at, and makin' such a unhearthly row about is a buoy, guv'nor !-' When you suspect worms at t...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LIFEBOATS FOR WATEHPLANES. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

LIFEBOATS FOR WATEHPLANF.S. The Admiralty have decided that all waterplanes used by naval air men shall carry a miniature lifeboat suspended underneath the body of the machine. In so doing they have adopted an idea of Lieutenant Spencer Grey, who laBt summer HaH hnilt for him a tiny dinghy which he carried beneath his Sopwith machine. It was made of cedar, find with a couple of small oars, a mast, and sail, weighed close on 30rb, j It has frequently carried two pas sengers across Southampton Water, and can be lowered into the fch from , the aeroplane, and lifted out again i with very little effort. . i

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Fads of Fatalists. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

Fads of Fatalists. A great many people like to ima gine in their own minds that they are fatalists—that is, that from the moment of their birth their destiny has been mapped out for them, and that no effort upon their part, however strenuous, u ill have tho slightest effect upon their careers. If they are destined to be successes in life, they will he so ; if failures, nothing will prevent them. Of course, this wn.v of viewing life, if strictly carried out, can have but one ending—failure. Iror I it means that the individual who believes in it must simply allow] himself to drift with the stream, [ trusting to his destiny to land hint at the right port, and if that port happens to be the port of failure, he would put it down to his nl reudy-mnpped-out career, and would resign himself unconditionally to his fate, without attaching any blame to himself. But, luckily for the human race at large, nobody is really at heart a fatalist, any more than there is really such a thing as a genuin...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUBMARINE WITH WHEELS. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 25 June 1914

| SUBMARINE WITH WHEELS. A submarine-boat with wheels to enable it to travel on the bed of the occan or of river and harbour chan nels, is one of the recent striking ad ditions to the United States Navy. Although the new vessel "The Seal" is the first submarine in the United States Navy to be equipped with wheels, the idea was found practi cable on a Russian experimental sub marine, which was thus able to navi gate channels and to get near to breakwater fortifications, without be ing discovered. "The Seal" is the fastest submarine in the U.S. Navy. Her speed on the Biirface is about 21 miles an hour, and when submerged and but a few feet from the bottom she has made 12.67 miles.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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