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Elephind.com contains 32,835 items from Gippsland Mercury, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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BUSINESS COURTSHIP. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

BUSINESS COURTSHIP: An amusing case was once decided in a Frankfort police court. It ap pears that a cook, no longer quite young, was courted by a tailor some what younger than she. On Sun days, and occasionally during the week, the gallant lover was in the habit of taking his lady for extended promenades and visits to restaurants. where the latter always paid the ex penses. She also provided him re gularly with his supper. Presently, however, the awful truth was brought home to the cook that she was not the only friend on whom the man of the scissors and the need le lavished his affections. Nothing loth, she went to the nearest police court, suing the faithless one for all the expenses of the clandestine meals provided by her, and all the money spent when "walking out" with him. The tailor, however, was once again too much for her. Instead of appearing before the tribunal as a repentant sinner, he came nto court with a long bill in his hand, on which was an account of the time lost...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FORTUNES MADE FROM BOXING. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

FORTUNES MADE FROM BOXING. Interesting information is given in "How to Become a Boxer'" regarding earnings of men who have won laur els in the ring. Packy 31'Farland, it is stated, was discovered to have box ing talent when working at the age of fifteen in the Chicago packing yards. Before he had reached the age of eighteen he had taken part in no few er than eighteen professional con tests, all of which he won. He is not twenty-five years of age yet, but he has accumulated a fortune of about sixty thousand pounds. Battling Nelson, after twelve years of fighting had a bank roll of £470,(0, which grew pretty rapidly during the five years -which followed until he re tired. Freddie Welsh, it is conjectured, has "tucked away more than £20,000." and George Carpentier, the French idol, has, though not yet twenty, put aside somewhere near £20,000. The gross earnings of Jack Johnson between December 26th, 190S, and July 4th, 1912, are computed to be over £100,000. From the Jeffries con test...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
More Important. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

More Important. Mr. Dustin did not approve of his son's choice of a wife, and was trying to persuade him to s e things as he did. "Yes, you are quite righ:. father., said the son. "Mabel has her defects,. she is vain, full of pretensions and egrand ideas, with a very difficult char acter. But, father, in spite of all. 1 simply adore her: I can't live with out her." "But that is not the question. my boy," said the father. "Can you live with her?"

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Meeting the Difficulty. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

Meeting the Difficulty. A good story is told of a worthy Quaker who lived in a country town. The friend was rich and benevolent, and his means were put in frequent requisition for purposes of local char ity or usefulness. The townspople wanted to rebuild their parish church and a committee was appointed to raise funds. It was agreed that the Quaker could not be asked to sub scribe towards an object so contrary :o his principles; but then, on the other hand, so true a friend to the town might take it amiss if he were not at least consulted on a matter of such general interest. So one of their number went and explained to him their project the old church was to be removed, and such and such steps taken towards the construction cf a new one. "Thee wast right," said the Quak er, "in supposing that my principles would not allow me to assist in build ing a church. But didst thee not say something about pulling down a church? Thee mayst put my name down for a hundred pounds to pull it down...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Judging From Appearances. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

Judging From Appearances. When Shimmerpate gave his little son Sammie * drawing-book, the lat ter gazed intently at the pictures of arms, legs, feet and heads on one of the, pages. "What do you think of it, son?" ask ed Shimmerpate. "My word, father," replied Sammie. "it must have been an awful explo sion." "The New Magazine" is unique. For sixpence w get several pages of il lustrations in tints, of scenes and characters in the last popular London play. In this number (April) it is "Hullo. Tango," and a great array of illustrated stories by that popular authoress Olive Wadsley, H. P. Han shew, Randolph Lichfield, Sax Rolih mer, and many other well-known writers. There is a complete long novel entitled "The Devil's Corner," by Andrew Soutar, and many useful pages specially for the ladies and the home, embracing fashions, cookery, etc., under the heading of "The Wo man's Kingdom.'t

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

STATE SAVINGS BANK OF VICTORIA grants LOANS ON EASY TERMS. up to three fifths of valuation. ON BROAD ACRES .... ..... . .. .. .. .... £2000 to £25000 ON TOWN PROPERTIES .. ... .... .. .. .. ..£500 to £25000 for a term of 3 or 5 years with option of paying off a portion on any pay day. Interest 5 per cent. CREDIT FONCIER LOANS up to two thirds of valuation. ON FARMS ...£50 to £2000. Repayable by Instalments spread over 30 years, with interest at 5 per cent. Security may be either Freehold, or Crown Leasehold that could be made Freehold at any time on payment of the balance of Crown Rents. Loans may be granted for the purpose of purchasing the land taken as security, or paying off existing liabilities thereon, paying Crown Rents, improving, developing, or carrying on the farm, purchasing stock, machinery, etc. ON COTTAGES, VILLAS and SHOPS .. .. £50 to £1000. Repayable by Instalments spread over 19% years, with Interest at 5 per cent. No Charge for Mortgage Deed. Full information on a...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GREATER THAN GOLD Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock and Co., London & Melbourne. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER I. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

GREATER THAN GOLD By L. T. MEADE, Author of "The Soul of Margaret Rand," etc. ....----*---- Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock and Co., London & Melbourne. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER 1. -'Is that you, Peter?" The eyes of Paul Danvers were raised with difficulty, his breath was ccming fast, he looked through the dim shadow of death at Peter Bel lairs, the friend of his life. "You have come. You are good," said Paul, and he smiled faintly as le moved one very tlhin hand until it touched the hand, firmn, brown and strong, of his comrade. "I was the lucky one, in one sense," he added after a pause. "We both rnude up our minds to be rich, but somnehow I got tile gold and-you?" 1 am a poor man still," answered peter Bellairs. 'Well, never mind, never mind," said Paul. "You are not dying in your youth and I am. I have made my pile. The diamond fields at Kimber key, you understand: I was in at the rush, and I have left some of the money in trust to you for Sheila, my little ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PARIS—A SYNONYM OF YOUTH. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

PARIS-A SYNONYM OF YOUTH. Paris when your skies are graying, how many of us know you? Do we know your Rue du Pont Neuf, with its silent melodrama under the dawning heavens-or do we know only the farce of your Montmartre? Do we see the laughter in dancing eyes in the Rue Mouffctard-or. in the revel of your Saturday night, do we see only the belladonna'd leer of the drabs in the Place Pigalle? Do we know the romance of your peoples-or the ro mance of your restaurateurs? Which? I wonder. Paris has changed. It isn't the Paris of other days, you say; and Paquer ette. little Easter daisy, little flower of France-little Paquerette is (lead. And you are old now and married, and there are the children to look out for-they're at the school age - and life's quondam melody is full of rests and skies are not always as blue as once they were. And Paris, four thousand miles beyond the seas Paris. isn't what it used to be! But Paris is. For Paris is not a city-it is Youth. And Youth never dies. To ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WINTER IN ARCADY. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

WINTER IN ARCADY. Is it months or years, dear Kitty, Since we left the murky city, (The rain is wanly dripping through the plaster in the hall), And our wand'ring foot.teps rested 1n the shade of this sequestered Little cottage with the jasmine cling ing coyly to the wall? When we found this haven. dearie, We were pleasure-cloyed and weary, (The wind is softly sobbing through the panels and the lath). I considered it rheumatic; But succumbed to your ecstatic Approbation of the streamlet at the bottom of the path. There like Rosalind in Arden You disported in the garden Till the sunset crowned the willows with its golden aftermath: And we watched the aspens quiver. Yes. I felt the timbers shiver; (tTis the summer-house a-cruising up and down the garden path.) H-ow we dallied with the hours 'Neath a canopy of flowers (Another prize chrysanthemum's gone crashing by the beam). But these sylvan joys are fading And to-morrow we'll be wading To the city through the pathway at the bottom of...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
START. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

START. There's art in a start. Every good thing has waited for years, perhaps for ages, and only for a. starter. The good things in our life have waited in the same way, perhaps are waiting still. The art of start is this: Just begin. "Don't wait to feel like it, for you I wont. Don't wait till it is easier, for it never will be. If the thing ought to be done, start it, and start it now.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OLD POETS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

OLD POETS. If I should live in a forest And sleep underneath a tree, No grove of whispering saplings Would make a home for me. I'd go where the old oaks gather, Serene and good and strong, And they would not sigh and tremble And vex me with a song. The pleasantest sort of poet Is the poet who's old and wise, With an old white beard, and wrinkles About his kind old eyes. For these young flibbertigibbets A-rhyming their hours away, They won't be still like honest men And listen to what you say. The young poet screams forever About his sex and his soul, But the old man listens and smokes his pipe And polishes its bowl. There should be a club for poets Who have come to seventy year. They should sit in a great hall, drink ing. Red wine and golden beer. They would shuffle in of an evening, Each one to his cushioned seat, And there would be mellow talking And silence rich and sweet. There is no peace to be taken With poets who are young, For they worry about the wars to be fought And the s...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRANGE HONEYMOONS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

STRANGE HONEYMOONS. Surely one of the strangest was that of an American couple who, in June of last year. set out from New York harbor on a honeymoon trip to the Bermuda Islands in a tiny "cockle shell" boat some 12ft. long by 3ft. broad. No less thrilling a honeymoon ex perience was that of a MIr. and Mrs. Edgar, who were married in Peking in tile Legation chapel, on the day preceding that on which the Boxer riots broke out, and who, perforce, had to spend the first few weeks of their married life prisoners in the in vested city. witnessing many of the horrors of the rebellion, and going in daily fear of assassination. Another couple on the Continent, immediately after the marriage knot was tied, started off by balloon for England. Leaving Paris at four o'clock in the afternoon, they man aged to land across the Chan nel the following morning, after a soniewhat exciting time among the clouds. Then an adventurous pair of Swiss lovers, both keen mountaineers, chose the summit of Mont ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BADLY-DRESSED QUEENS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

BADLY-DRESSED QUEENS. It has been often asserted by those who know that scarcely one royal lady in Europe is really well dressed. Some of the younger royalties wear dresses too old for their years, and some of the older garb themselves in a fashion that is too young. The Empress of Germany is the best-dressed woman on a European throne. Sne does not 'buy her dresses in Paris, but in Berlin, London and Vienna. Counting every item, the Kaiserin spends about £2000 a year on dress. The Queen of Holland is said to be the worst-dressed sove reign. In spite of this, she manages to spend about twice as much on her clothes as does Queen Mary. The former spends about £4000 a year, whilst the latter spends, on an aver age. about £2000. Queen Wilhelmina is accused of showing very bad taste in the choice of her frocks and hats. How-ever, she has some excuse. for in loyalty to her ow-n country she only e ploys Dutch dressmakers, and w-ho ever heard of a noted Dutch modiste? The costumes and hats ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Counter Irritation. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

Counter Irritation. "Father." said Mabel, "do you enjoy hearing me sing?" "Well," was the answer, "I don't know, but it's rather soothing in a way. It makes me forget my other troub!es`

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Like a Man. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

Like a Man. Mrs. Hicks: Dick behaved like a man in church. Hicks: Sat straight, did he? Mrs. Hicks: No, he went to sleep. A man who has his price gives him self away.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TAKE A HOT FOOT-BATH BEFORE GOING TO BED. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

TAKE A HOT FOOT-BATH BEFORE GOING TO BED. There is a mode of using hot wa ter. which is an exceedingly valuable one, according to the late Sir Hen ry Thompson in '"Diet in Relation to Age and Activity." It is the habit of taking a hot foot-bath every night before going to bed. for about ten or twelve minutes as hot as it can be borne. The effect of this on the feet, which should be immersed over the ankle, is to fill their vessels with blood rendered apparent by their deep red color-and this affords relief, by 'vithdrawing it from the brain. Es pocially after intellectual activity re sulting from public life, etc., as above referred to. also after prolong ed study or literary labor at nigh, the tranquillising effect on the ner vous system is very remarkable, and uiet sleep is promoted. Let the high est temperature which can be borne be maintained for at least ten minutes by repeated small additions from the hot-;rater can close at hand. According to Paris statistics. out of 2.525 wi...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A LAKE OF SOAP. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

A LAKE OF SOAP. One of Nature's marvels is to oe seen in the north-east corner of the State of Washington. It is a lake which bears the name of Soap Lake, and is three miles in length by one wile in breadth. The water in th lake tastes like a mixture of soap nud salt. and its peculiar properties are such that when the water is heat ed no soap is required for a bath. for as soon as the water conmes in contact with the natural oil of the skin. and is gently rubbed, it forms beautiful lather. The only drawback is that whan applied to the head, one's hair is apt to turn from its natural color to a dusty red, if not washed with fresh water. In other words. it bleaches. the soda in the water no doubt ie ing the cause of this. The Soap Lake is well knoiwn throughout America on accorunt of its wonderful healing properties. In deed. it is asserted that its waters provide a cure for all the ills the flesh is heir to. Rheumatism, skini diseases, stomach and blood disor ders-all seem to give wa...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Pluck in Defeat. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

Pluck in Defeat. A recent Socialist candidate said of his defeat: "At any rate we put up, we Social ists, a brave if hopeless fight. And now, in our defeat, we are as cheery as the traveller. He bought a ticket, Lnd then, going out on the platform, said: ' How soon does the train start?' " "'Why, there she goes now,' said a station hand. 'You've just missed h er.' "The traveller leapt on to the line and set out in pursuit of the train with all his might. But in two or three minutes he came trudging back over the ties. "A laughing crowd had gathered, and the station hand said: 'Well, did you catch her?' "'No,' said the traveller; 'but, by jingo, I made her puff.'" "Cassell's" for April-the largest magazine in the world-is just issued. There is the same wonderful value, the repeated wonder of fine subjects and favorite writers as in previous numbers. Warwick Deeping. Olive Wadsley, H. G. Wells, Radcliffe Mar tin, and a host of other well-known authors contribute to this issue, and the...

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What He Said. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 18 April 1914

What He Said. Counsel: I insist on an answer to myj- question. You have not told me all the conversation. I want to know all that passed between you and Mr. Jones on the occasion to which you re fer. Reluctant Witness: I've told you everything of any consequence. - Counsel: You have told me you said to hinm, "Jones. this case will get into the court some day." Now. I want to know what hie said in reply. Reluctant Witness: \Well, be said, "Brown, there isn't anything in this business that I'm ashamed of, and if any snooping. little. yee-hawing, four 'by-six. gimlet-eyed lawyer, with half a pound of brains and sixteen ounces of jaw, ever wants to know what I've been talking about. just tell him.'

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUCTION SALES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Mercury — 21 April 1914

AUCTION SALES. Messrs. Theo. B. Little and Co. hold their Rosedale sale on Friday. In addition to their borough yards sale on Saturday, they will sell _ acre in Thompson-street for Mr. J. O'Shea. Their Stratford sale takes place. next Monday. Messrs. 3fathieson and Davis hold a great clearing sale for Mr. D. Lang lands at lleytield to-day. Their Cow warr sale takes place on W1erdnesday. Their horse sale will be held on Thurs day, and on Friday they hold their. Darriman sale. They hold a special sale of store sheep and cattle at the borough yards on Saturday .next. Messrs. A. M' Lean and Co. sell at' Longford to-day splendid sheep and cattle. On Thursday, April 23, they hold a special sale of store sheep, when 7000 will be yarded. They hold a sp)ecial cattle sale at Sale on W,'ed-' nesday next. Messrs. A. - Macarthur and Co. sell at Bairnsdale on Friday 2000 good store cattle.

Publication Title: Gippsland Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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