ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
WHERE KIPLING IS STAYING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

WHERE KIPLING IS STAYING. Mr. Rudyard Kipling is at present with his   family at Woolsack Cottage, a charming little   retreat in a corner of Mr. Cecil Rhodes' estate   at Rondesbosch, near Cape Town. This minia-   ture dwelling-place was built by Mr. Rhodes   some years ago, as a sort of hermitage when   he wished, as he often does, to be quite away   from all human society. On the occasion of   Mr. Rudyard Kipling's first visit to the Cape,   some few years ago, says "To-day," he was   much struck with the beauties of this spot, and Mr. Rhodes at once offered to place it at his   disposal whenever he desired to occupy it, with   the result that the poet has been there three   times since. As his friends are aware, Mr. Kip-   ling is by no means of a robust constitution,   and he finds the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE UNHAPPY BRIDEGROOM. AS A WOMAN SEES HIM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

THE UNHAPPY BRIDEGROOM.         AS A WOMAN SEES HIM. Inasmuch as there are many more eligible   women than men, and the supply of bride-   grooms is not, therefore, equal to the demand,   it would seem that at a wedding the most con- spicuous and important personage would be the man, and that his would be the name that was the headliner on the programme. So far is this from being the case that at no other time and place is the lord of creation of such small consequence, and many a man   never fully realises of how little importance he is in the world until he attends his own wed- ding. Nobody notices him, nobody speaks to him except the heroic friend who has undertaken to see him through, and who bids him in hoarse asides to "brace up." Nobody consults the bridegroom's tastes or preferences in the wed- ding arrangements, or cares how he looks, and if by any chance he should be acc...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DELICATELY ADJUSTED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

DELICATELY ADJUSTED. "Undoubtedly among the most perfectly made instruments in the world must be reckoned the scales we use in our business," says a diamond merchant. "For one thing, the weights are so extremely small, the unit being a carat, which in itself is no more than 3 1-6 grains. "This, which was originally a small berry or seed used in India for weighing gems, is made of platinum, and has been divided and sub- divided into halves, quarters, eighths, six- teenths, and even sixty-fourths. So you can imagine that scales have to be true.     "For that reason the balances are never re- moved from beneath their glass shade except   when in actual use, while the weights them-   selves are put into the scale with forceps, to   prevent them being affected by the touch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE DISAPPOINTED ONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

THE DISAPPOINTED ONE. "He promised to be here at 5 o'clock, and now it is half-past 7. Just think of the many heart- aches a man causes a woman. I'll be bound he's transferred his affections to Jessie Dugan."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CAUSE AND EFFEC[?]. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

CAUSE AND EFFECT. She: "Some doctors claim that unhealthy re- sults follow kissing."   He: "They've got cause and effect twisted. Kissing is generally the result of a heart affec- tion." —Philadelphia Record.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ACTRESS AND ACTOR. "H.M.S. IRRESPONSIBLE." MISS KITTY LOFTUS SUES MR. ARTHUR ROBERTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

ACTRESS AND ACTOR.   "HM.S. IRRESPONSIBLE." —♦— MISS KITTY LOFTUS SUES MR. ARTHUR ROBERTS. Miss Kitty Loftus brought an action in Mr.   Justice Darling's Court recently against Mr. Arthur Roberts to recover damages for breach   of contract in regard to the West-end run of   "H.M.S. Irresponsible."   This musical play, said Mr. Rawlinson, K.C.,   for the plaintiff, was first produced in the pro-   vinces in November of 1900, and Miss Kitty   Loftus agreed to play the leading lady's part in   a suburban tour at a much smaller salary than   she would take in London, on the express under-   standing that if it was produced in the West-   end she got the same part on West-end terms,   The agreement, signed by Mr. Roberts, ran:   "In the event of the above play coming to town   under any West-end ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Latest Portrait of De Wet. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

The Latest Portrait of De Wet. There is something particularly interesting about this characteristic portrait of the grim, bold raider. Those who remember the photographs published when his deeds first caused his name to be in every mouth will note how much more grisly and war-worn Christian De Wet's features now appear. To-day he looks like a man who has endured countless hard- ships and privations; and his countenance wears an air of sterner resolve than ever. Note, also, the peculiar slant of the mouth. Christian De Wet is evidently a man in the prime vigor of life, and the months that   have passed since he first appeared on the scene of action, and by his remarkable achieve- ments won world-wide notoriety, have left their mark in the sterner lines that now appear on his resolute face. There is nothing of the dandy about him; his appearance being what, for want of a better word, may be termed "neglige." He is essentially a man of action, boldly ambitious, yet curbin...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NOISE DESTROYER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

A NOISE DESTROYER. At last, an electric carriage call has been de- vised, which will, no doubt, be universally adopt- ed at theatres and other public buildings. By a simple arrangement, the number of the carriage wanted is shown in a position where it can be seen for some distance, and thus the present noisy system of shouting-up and down the streets is done away with, greatly to the comfort of the people living and trying to sleep in the vicinity.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CAMBRIDGE TRAGEDY. ARREST AND DEATH OF A WEALTHY "DOCTOR." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

A CAMBRIDGE TRAGEDY. ARREST AND DEATH OF A WEALTHY "DOCTOR." A great sensation was caused in Cambridge (England), recently, by the arrest and tragic death of a resident of apparent wealth and high standing. Mr. G. Rowland Sinclair Rowland, M.A., M.D., as he called himself, occupied Edenfleld, one of the largest and most fashionable resi- dences in the outskirts of Cambridge, where he lived in great style. One afternoon a Scotland Yard detective ar- rived in the town, and, accompanied by members of the local police force, proceeded to his house to arrest him. His wife, niece, and a little boy had previously been taken into custody. The police searched the house for a consider- able time without finding him. At last he was discovered concealed between the ceiling and the roof, having gained access to this hiding place by a door masked behind a piece of furni- ture. He was taken to the police station, but shortly after arrival there he suddenly died, from an attack of apoplexy. It is s...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HAD BEEN THERE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

HAD BEEN THERE. "Divorces," said the man who wanted to talk   and philosophise, "cost more than marriages."   "Certainly," said the practical man. "Why   not? They are worth more."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KUBELIK FLED. EMINENT VIOLINIST IN DANGER AT THE HANDS OF ADMIRERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

KUBELIK FLED.   EMINENT VIOLINIST IN DANGER AT THE HANDS OF ADMIRERS. —♦— Kubelik, the eminent violinist, created a fu- rore among the New York ladies which quite puts in the shade the record held by Pade- rewski. In Brooklyn the other night, Kubelik's necktie was torn off by ladies who were endeavoring to kiss him and clip off a lock of his matchless hair. When the policemen finally got him into his carriage he imprudently waved his hand from   the window. It was at once grabbed and almost   wrenched off.   Another night Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt in-   vited a couple of hundred ultra-exclusive guests   to hear Kubelik play. At the conclusion the   ladies wept, and mobbed him till he fled.   An Irish policeman, who chaperoned the ex-   cited violinist to his cab, said, "Me son, ye don't   know your luck!"   Kubelik replied, "It's magnificent—...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ARMY OFFICERS. EXTRAORDINARY STORIES OF IGNORAMUSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

ARMY OFFICERS. EXTRAORDINARY STORIES OF IGNORAMUSES. Candidates for commissions in the British   army have now so low an educational test to pass that the examiners have recently been con- fronted with an array of smatterers anxious to lead soldiers in the field. It was at one time thought that the exigencies of war promoted this abnormal condition, but that has been exploded, and the commission now sitting in England is finding that the trouble is much more deep-seated, and that it lies in the fact that a sufficient number of men of the right educational standard is not coming for- ward. It has been found necessary to lower the   standard for admission, and it is recorded officially that one candidate was recently passed into the cavalry who got 168 marks out   of 20,000: and six cavalry officers between them   got less than 15,000 marks out of 120,000.   This absence of educational qualification is   in ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EDUCATION IN AMERICA. STRIKING RECORD OF BICH MEN'S GENEROSITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

EDUCATION IN AMERICA. STRIKING RECORD OF RICH MEN'S GENEROSITY. —♦— A striking contrast is frequently made in   America between the generosity of its wealthy   classes in supplying funds for public education   and the relative rarity of similar generosity   among the wealthy classes in England.   The year 1901 has proved to have been a record   breaker in the matter of donations for educa-   tion in the United States. In 1899 the gifts to   colleges and schools had amounted to £11,000,000.   It was thought that for some time to come that   fine total would not be surpassed. As a matter of fact, the total for 1900 dropped to about £7,000,000, but for the year just elapsed the total has figured at more than £15,000,000. Of this sum £9,000,000 was contributed by three individuals. Mrs. Leland Sanford gave the magnificent sum of £6,000,000 to the Western Univ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DYNAMITE AS A LIFE-SAVER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

DYNAMITE AS A LIFE-SAVER.   —♦—       "Queer as it seems," observed a manufacturer of explosives, "it is nevertheless a fact that the invention of dynamite brought a feeling of re- lief to many minds.   "Before the invention of dynamite, those who required powerful explosives had to use nitro- glycerine, which is so dangerous that acci- dents were constantly happening—in one in- stance, a manufacturer of the explosive and nine other persons were blown to atoms by the perilous stuff.   "Then it was discovered that by mixing nitro- glycerine with a finely-powdered mineral sub- stance, it was converted from one of the most dangerous to one of the safest explosives, able to resist both heat and damp. "So you will see, therefore, that dynamite is a more humane production than it at first appears."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BEST COURSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

  THE BEST COURSE.   "Have you ever read an article on how to tell   a bad egg?"   "No I haven't; but my advice would be, if you   have anything important to tell a bad egg, why   break if gently."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FIGHTING CONSUMPTION. FRENCH DOCTORS LAY STRESS ON A NEW METHOD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

FIGHTING CONSUMPTION.   —♦— FRENCH DOCTORS LAY STRESS ON A NEW METHOD. An important scheme for the combating of   tuberculosis is on foot in Paris, undertaken by a   society of philanthropists, doctors, and chemists,   the feature of which is the founding of 200 hos-   pitals in that city and the provinces, where con-       sumptive patients will be treated on one method.   Before, however, proceeding to the actual work   of building, it was decided to establish one hos-   pital where the best approved methods should be   tested. A home was therefore founded at Rou-   baix, which is the centre of the most tuberculous   districts of France, and on Tuesday, January   14th, at the weekly meeting of the Academy of   Medicine, Dr. Livet, the head of the home, gave   an a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FIERCE DUEL. REMARKABLE COMBAT WITH A MILITARY OFFICER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

A FIERCE DUEL. REMARKABLE COMBAT WITH A MILITARY OFFICER. Midshipman Diraison, whose book "Les Mari- times," provided him with a sheaf of duels, fought his fifth on January 12 against Lieu- tenant Vidal, of the 112th Infantry, on the Island of the Grand Jatte, on the Seine, near Paris. The weapons selected were swords, and it was soon apparent that the army man was superior to the seaman. Diraison, stout, yet brave, fought coolly enough, but stiffly. After four minutes it was found that the points of the swords had been blunted by being knocked against the guards. It was agreed to have the swords sharp- ened and resume the combat at midday. During the suspension all the party, duellists, seconds, and all, lunched on the spot. On the resumption of the duel the combatants fought for some minutes without result. At the 13th round Vidal's sword was seen to bend against the lower part of Diraison's body, and a halt was cried. Diraison was found to have sus- tained a slight flesh wound of...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISER'S FORTUNE. BEING FOUGHT FOR IN THE PARIS LAW COURTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

MISER'S FORTUNE. BEING FOUGHT FOR IN THE PARIS LAW COURTS. A fortune of £60,000 is now being fought for in the Paris Courts by the heirs of Mme. Marie Chretien, an extraordinary old miser, who died, aged 77, a year ago, in Paris. Several years before her death the old woman lived quite alone in a miserable hovel in the Rue de la Michodiere. When the officers of the law came to search the dwelling after Mme. Chretien's death, they found it in such a disgusting state of filth that the whole hovel has had since to be destroyed. Prior to this, however, they found scattered all over the place £2460 in specie, bonds worth £46,600, and deeds proving that the old miser was the owner of seven houses. It was at first thought that she had left no relations to benefit by this wealth. Subsequently 14 cousins, five and six times removed, came forward to share the spoil, and they are now squabbling in the law courts over the validity ot their respective relationships.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ARAB MAXIMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

ARAB MAXIMS. Here are five Arab maxims, which have under- lying them a deal of truth:— Never tell all you know, for he who tells every- thing he knows often tells more than he knows. Never attempt all you can do; for he who at- tempts everything he can do often attempts more than he can do. Never believe all you hear; for he who believes all that he hears often believes more than he hears. Never lay out all you can afford, for he who lays out everything he can afford often lays out more than he can afford. Never decide upon all you may see; for he who decides upon all that he sees often decides on more than he sees.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIS CUSTOM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 1 March 1902

HIS CUSTOM. She: "I suppose you will commit suicide if I refuse you."     He: "That has been my custom."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x