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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

HIUIJI IIHWMII" ipJll i 208 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. How George Ket his Promise. A True Stouy. Many years ago, in a Catholic school at Rouen, France, a boy of ten years was among the First Communicants. He was handsome, studious, fond of play, yet pure and pious as an angel. He went to confession once a fortnight and was especially devout to the Blessed Virgin. As the great day ap proached he prepared for it in the most edifying manner. Finally, on the evening before he said to his teacher, who was also his confessor: Father, I have thought of something. I want to keep my white cravat that I shall wear to-morrow, and put it on always when I go to Holy Communion, so that I may be reminded never to commit a mortal sin. Do you think that would be a good plan?" "Do you mean that you wish never to wear it except when you approach the Holy Sacrament, George?" "Yes, Father, that is what I mean." "I think it a very good plan. Have you said anything to your mother about it?" "Not yet, Father; bu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

wo wmmuwW- U!'J THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 209 and confusion. Seeing the Prussians advance in triumph into the heart of France, the fiery soul of the Norman youth felt impelled to join the ranks of those who were fighting for their beloved country. He was eighteen years of age. He asked and odtained permission of his father to enroll himself under the banner of the famous Charette and march to the deliver ance of unhappy France. In the army as at college he was the same fervent young Christian, with this difference: whenever possible now he ap proached the Holy Table every week instead of every fort night. At the same time he was one of the bravest and most cheerful of soldiers. It was in January, 1871. Five hundred Zouaves were or dered to storm a hight occupied by the enemy in the environs of Mans. Two hundred of these young men paid the penalty of their heroism. At the first onslaught George was mortally wounded. The army chaplain soon made his appearance to adminis ter the last holy r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

IFKPWBI '"vjf i Tifrrc 2IO THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "I am ready, Father, to receive Holy Communion for the last time." When the Viaticum had been administered, the young man turned once more to the priest. "Father," he said and now his voice grew fainter and fainter, "I have one more request to make of you. As soon as I am dead, take off this white cravat and send it to my mother. Write her this: 'George sends you his white cravat; it has never received a single mortal stain but the blood he shed for his beloved France.'" He expired shortly after. The chaplain fulfilled his pious request, confident that with his last sigh another saint was added to the heavenly cohorts. The Nagging Father. "If he be sincere with himself," writes the Catholic Record of the faultfinding father, "he must own that he has tried and succeeded in making home the dreariest place on earth for wife and children. His children fear him, the wife endures him. When he enters the house it becomes as still as the grave...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

EDITORIAL. JTHETliroiAN ' ADVOCATE Tttttlitttt'..????????!?!?!!?ttttttttt?!!!;!!!?!t!?l?!!ltt'ttttttttt???Tt?? I I 4 it Published by the Benedictine Fathers of if . J ! w i H W I J SACRED HEART MISSION, OICLAHOMA. jj I A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. THRMS OF SUHSOKIPTIONi Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVILEGES, r. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of Sept...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

.ai ysRjprjgB "-wj 212 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. t! The good we cannot do to God because He has need of nothing, we should do to our neighbor for the love of God. A head properly constituted can accomodate itself to whatever pillow the vicissitudes of fortunes may place under it. To be effectively honest a man must be honest at heart. Honesty that comes through a bell punch is full of holes. French history appears to be repeating itself. The Reign of Terror of one hundred and ten years ago is finding its dup licate in the reign of Combes, the apostate. According to a decree of the Congregation of Rites, after the invocation "Mother most Admirable" in the Litany of the Blessed Virgin, there should be added that of Mother of Good Counsel. "So far," says the New Century, "compared with the present treatment of the Church in European countries, the action of the United States Government in the Philip pines is wise and tolerant." "That is true," answers the Cath olic Columbian; "and compared ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 213 the watchful eye of restriction, he takes to himself the most playful companions, regardless of their morals. Thus; it often happens, that he loses more in two months than he has gain ed in a whole year. Let parents keep a sharp eye on Jack dur ing the vacation. The Indian Bureau has resolved to discontinue the prac tice of serving Government rations to Indians on the reserva tion out West. Instead of this, it will offer them a regular daily wage for work, employing them on its farms, making roads, and in other ways. Those who do not work will go hungry. This plan, prudently administered, is most desirable. There was no sense, quoth the above named exchange, in the policy of feeding theaborigenes in idleness. It only encourag ed them to be worthless, to learn nothing, and to do nothing. The "Johnny-get-your-hair-cut" order has been revoked by Commissioner Jones; but the "Lo, get-to-your-daily-task -or-you'11-lack-your-daily-bread" regulation will be enfor ce...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

214 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Episcopal Visitation. On Saturday, June 13, Sacred Heart was honored by a visit from the Rt. Rev. Bishop Meerschaert, Vicar Apostolic of Indian Territory. He came for the purpose of administer ing the Sacrament of Confirmation, which happy event took place on the following day June 14. The Bishop presided at the Solemn High Mass and after wards confirmed seventy persons of all age, sex, race, and nationality. The children (19) who made their first Holy Commun ion on Ascension day and the other candidates for Confirma tion (seventy in all) had been receiving careful instructions for a long time and were well prepared by the exercises of the re treat given by Rev. Fr. Norbert O. S. B., for the great things which God was to accomplish in their souls on these, for them, eventful days. May the remembrance of these sacred days keep green in their memories throughout life, and may the graces of Holy Communion and Confirmation fructify and be a source of strength in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 215 Tor Nixon's Kid. Tom Hall. ThO roofs of the busy little cattle town lay scorching in the rays of the hot July sun. The prairies, parched and bare, stretched away in every direction as far as the eye could reach. To the south lay the river the Arkansas now but a line of quicksands with an occasional pool bordered by a fringe of undergrowth; which drooped motionless in the heat. Far be yond, near the sandhills on the horizon, groups of dark mov ing odjects could be descried bunches of moving cattle driven up from Texas for shipment eastward. Midway between the town and the river there whirls along a little cloud of dust, which on nearer view, discloses a sturdy little mustang, coming onward at a slow lope with its head down. Its rider, a cowboy, stretches out his foot and looks at his worn leather leggins derisively, then touches his belt, were lies money enough to buy new ones and more, much more. If luck favors him tonight he thinks of Dawson's ranch now for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

mmmmmmm 216 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. garment, with a head of yellow curls and a pair of wide blue eyes which last have been regarding him admiringly from the doorway. He picks the child up awkwardly, expecting a tem pest of tears, but instead receives a smile and a pat on his brown cheek. "Oo is bootful," coos the small thing in its baby voice. "Oo dot a pitty hat, and dot a pitty tie and everysing," In all his life no one had ever called Long Jim beautiful before, and this open admiration pleased him greatly, He presses a dollar into the little fat hand. "Buy yerself somethin'," he suggests. A soft mouth is lifted up to his. "Kiss baby," it demands. The pressure of the soft baby lips g'ves the man a cur ious sensation, and he looks after the child wistfully as it patters down the store. "Why, howdy, Jim? Makin' up with Nixon's kid? Ain't he a cute little un?" exclaims a voice at his elbow, and he turns to greet another of his kind, dressed like himself in full cowboy panoply. "Howdy, B...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

nHHpRfPPfT1 WPSfHll'W'5JW'HJJ n THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 217 many are, early in the evening; those who are left drinking more heavily and betting more recklessly as the time goes on. Long Jim has had phenomenal luck from the start. The cards he needed have come to his hand, the pile of chips in front of him has grown higher and higher, till all the room are talking of "Jim's luck." There are but four in the game now. If Jim wins this time visions of Dawson's ranch flit through his mind as he puts another handful of chips into the "pot." One man drops out. The second follows him in the next raise, leaving Jim and one antagonist opposite each oter, each grimly intend on his hand, and the growing pile of spoils bervveen them. The betting goes on calmly on Jim's side, nervously on the part of the other who drums noiselessly on the table. To Jim it meant Dawson's ranch; to the other feverishly he sees himself restored with this money to the world he has lost. Lost through his own fault, yet ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "He drawed his gun first," says someone and the crowd repeats it. "Nixon was always a bad one," says another. "Nixon?" Jim's hand pauses in midair over the money on the table. "Nixon." He sees a little curly head with blue eyes and feels the pressure of a pair of soft red lips. He pau ses but a moment. Then from his neck he unties the bright yellow handkerchief. Into it he sweeps the pile upon the table. He ties it firmly and lays his revolver on the top. Then he goes over to the bar and pushes the bundle across to the man behind it, the crowd watching him. "It's for the kid," he says gruffly, "Nixon's kid." Midway between the town and the river, there whirls a little cloud of dust, which on nearer view discloses a sturdy little mustang going outward at a slow lope, with its head down and its rider, a cowboy. We received from the Rev. Editor of the Canadian Mes senger (Montreal) two manuals for the special benefit of Schools and Academies they are also useful fo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

"apmppwwm " '.!' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 219 (Communicated. ) A Pleasant Evening. One of the enjoyable incidents of the visit of His Lord ship, Right Reverend Bishop Meerschaert, to Sacred Heart, was the entertainment given in his Honor by the pupils of St. Mary's Academy. The school rooms were tastefully decorated for the joyous occasion; Miss Annie Lareau presided at the piano, and as the children marched in file to their places on the stage, all present promised themselves a pleasant evening, nor were their expectations disappointed. The exercises opened with a welcome address to the Bishop on the occasion of his first visit to St. Mary's, since the school had been rebuilt, and it expressed the pupils' heart felt gratitute for the active interest His Lordship had taken in having their school restored. The children then sang a welcome hymn which had been composed for the occasion. A duet, "The Sinking Ship," was very effectively rendered by the Misses Detrick and Burnett. "A Flag Son...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

'in.MiHwmjlj i.nnyjpi.ii i,hp wwii 220 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. iL the scholastic year, and expressing his satisfaction that their so-called "second home " had been restored, and moreover as it was the sisters first mission in the Territory and as they had come to the Territory expressly for Missionary work and particularly for work among the Indians, it was his earnest desire, as well as that of the Sisters, that they should resume the work at St. Mary's again which he hoped would continue to prosper. Those who had the pleasure of being admitted to the school rooms expressed their delight and appreciation of the work in very high terms. Their only regret was that invita tions had to be restricted to a few friends residing in the im mediate vicinity. We are happy to notice that the work of the Sisters of Mercy is recognized the world over as being thorough in ever sense of the word, for with that indefatigable zeal so charac teristic of those who sacrfice themselves for others, they hav...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 221 y' sand dollars towards the rebuilding of St. Mary's Academy; nor can we pass over the aid received from the magnanimous Mother Catharine Drexel, whose name should ever be held in veneration as one of the noblest benefactress' of the Red Man, as the great work she has done clearly demonstrates. THE CLEVER KITTENS. "My cat speaks French," said little Jeanne, "As plainly as can be; Says ,s'il vous plait' (that's 'if you please') And thanks me with 'mercil' I know, because I understand Each word she says to me," "And mine speaks German," with a nod, Said Lisa from the Rhine; "Says 'bitte' when she wants a drink And 'ja,' of course, and 'nein;' I wouldn't have a cat that spoke A different tongue from mine!" "That's thrue for you!" sweet Nora said, With merry look demure. "Me own shpakes Oirish! Whin I set A saucer on the flure An' ask her would you like some milk The darlint tells me 'Shurel' " I met those kittens afterward, No matter where nor how; I listened w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

i ULr 222 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. $ Local Paragraphs. May 21, the Very Rev. Wm. H. Ketcham, Director of the Catholic Indian Bureau visited our schools. Mr. Andrew Haeringer took the holy Habit of our Order May 31. Bro. Rupert is the name given him. Our Schools are closed, both students and teachers are gone to re create thamselves and to re-visit the dear ones at home. Mr. Albert Monntt, an old student of Sacred Heart College, is spending his vacation with his parents at Sacred Heart, Okla. Oklahoma and Indian Territory are tied in the matter of railroad mileage, each having 2,200 miles to its credit. Both are bulding more at break-neck speed. The Picnic held by the Catholic Forresters (Sacred 'Heart Court) May 18, was a complete success in every respect. The Forresters hereby express their thanks to all who attended As we pen these lines our confreres, Fathers and brothers are busily engaged in harvesting, gathering fruits, and digging potatoes "Ora et labora" "Work and pray" is the B...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

The Indian Advocate L Vol. XV. AUGUST, 193. No. I 1 .EC FLOWERS OF THE HEART. X There are some flowers that bloom, Tended by angels even from their birth, Filling the world with beauty not of earth, And heaven-born perfume. Along Life's stony path, To many a toiling pilgrim, cheer they bring, And oftentimes in living glory spring Besides the poor Man's health. Fairest of all the band (E'en as the snowdrop lifts its fearless head In storm and wind, unmoved, unblemished), Truth's precious blossoms stand. The daisy's star is bright, O'er vale and medow sprinkled wide and free, So to the shadowed earth doth Charity Bring soft celestial light. O cherish carefully The tender bud of Patience; 'tis a flower Beloved of God! in sorrow's darkest hour 'Twill rise to comfort thee. So when all else hath gone Of joy and hope, through winter's icy gloom, The Alpine violet puts forth its bloom Where sunbeam never shone. Strong Self-denial's stem Of thorns, clasp well, for, if not upon earth, In Para...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

ppnpp9nppr-- 224 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE w i,,i;''P?fyy,flf (From St. Anthony's Messenger,) False and True History of Spanish America. (conclusion.) "3y declaring the Indian to be a crown vassal, the laws placed him on an equal footing with the native of Spain in one sense, and yet, practically, he enjoyed a much more favorable position. He became a special ward of the royal government, and the complaint by Spanish settlers is very well grounded, that everything was done for the Indian, and but little for them. The original form of the Indian govern ment was maintained, and only such modifications made as became necessary to assure the supremacy of Spain in case of need." "Any other nation governing the Indian according to European systems might have achieved similar results; but the special merit of Spain consists in having achieved them, whereas other natipns occupying American soil have given comparatively little attention to the well-being and con servation of the red man. Certain i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

-, Liiimi. iiipiwjii.ujk u v,, -w THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 225 The royal decrees in favor of the Indian were numerous, and the labor bestowed by the Kings of Spain and their councils on the Indian question was immense, so that it would require a special monograph of great extent in order to do justice to the subject. . . . No reliance can be placed upon rhe numerical statement concerning the so-called Spanish blood baths, particularly none upon those of the Bishop of Chiapas, Bartolome de Las Casas. The whole literature of that period should be read with the same reserve with which we receive the political 'campaign literature' of the present." Chas. F. Lummis writes in his "Spanish Pioneers": "The legislation of Spain in behalf of the Indians everywhere was incomparably more extensive, more comprehensive, more systematic, and more human than that of Great Britain, the Colonies, and the present United States all combined. Those first teachers gave the Spanish language .and Christian fai...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

226 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE time. It is due to the generous and manly laws made by Spain 300 years ago that our most interesting and advanced Indians, the Pueblos, enjoy today full security in their lands; while nearly all others (who never came fully under Spanish dominion) have been time after time ousted from lands our government had solemnly given to them. i "That was the beauty of an Indian policy which was ruled, not by politics, but by the unvarying principle of hu manity. The Indian was first required to be obedient to his new government. He could not learn obedience in everything all at once; but he must at least refrain from . butchering his new neighbors. As soon as he learned that lesson he was insur ed protection in his rights of home and family1and property. Then, as rapidly as such a vast work could be done' by an army of missionaries who devoted their lives to the danger ous task, he was educated to citizenship and Christianity." If we consider attentively the great achi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 August 1903

ft r-' ") 'JHMWWWT' THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 227 we remember that it isa means and not an end, a tool and not an accomplishment which points of business common sense we are quite as apt to forget in Wall Street as in the mines. The scientific history of today has fully shown how folishly false is the idea that the Spaniards sought merely gold; how manful ly they provided for the mind and soul as well as for the pock et. But gold was with them, as it would be even now with other men, the strong motive. The great difference was only that gold did not make them forget their religion." I will close with a short comparison taken from Bande lier's "Gilded Man": "The Spaniard took and held the land, and saved its inhabitants; in the United States we have des troyed the people to get their land. The Spaniards subdued the aborigines openly; we approach them in disguise of neigh bors, pursue them and vex them often for years, till the de sired offense is committed which affords us a pretext of re...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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