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Title: Vancouver Independent, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,989 items from Vancouver Independent, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

Vancouver Independent. OmciAL Papu or Citt akd Cochtt. Vancouver, Clark* County, Washington Territory. TRCE TO THE CORE. The tall forest trees were casting long shadows, and the sun sinking low in the western sky, when a lady and gentleman paused in their walk to rest at a rustic stile that divided the field from the pretty grove that had been spared by the woodman's 1 ax, and which added much to the beauty of a scene naturally fine. The gentleman was a tall, finely-formed man, with a gay, dashing manner. The lady was almost as tall as he, her figure full" and graceful. She was rather inclined to be too silent. Perhaps one of her attractions to George Eustace was that he liked to talk and she to listen. She was listening in silence now, while ho told her he loved her, and asked her to be his wife. Her eyes were cast down, and her face flushed and troubled. "Then you don't love me, Lucia?" he said, when she made him no answer. "Then you don't love me?" he repeated, and the brown eyes...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

HE WASA'T ENGAGED. I went to live with Aunt Edmonton when poor papa died. That was half a dozen years ago, yet my trouble seems as fresh to-day, my loss as irreparable as on that terrible morning when I left him lying in his lonely grave under the wil lows. Poor papa! how fond we were of each other. He had no one in the world but me. Mamma diod when I was a wee baby, not quite two summers old—died away off in Southern France, and she sleeps there now nnder the shadows of the purple hills. I have seen many fair women, but never a face half so lovely as hers. Her portrait used to hang in the old gallery at Edmonton Hall, but it is gone now. Aunt Edmonton had something to do with its disappearance, for she never did like my mother. The Edmontons are a proud race, with a pedigree running back to the old Cava liers, and an ancient crest on their mas sive old silver, and the bluest of blue blood in their aristocratic veins. At least Aunt Edmonton says so. Papa al ways laughed at her high ...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

VANCOUVER INDEPENDENT. THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1881. The K.vi.ama Extension.—The Tacoma Ledger of April -9th says that a full engi neering party, consisting of about 14 men, left Tacoma that morning for Kalania to make a thorough instrumental survey for the extension of the Pacific Division east ward along the north bank of the Columbia river, to a connection with the Oregon it California railroad at Portland. An instru mental survey and location of this line was made several years ago, but it is thought that the same may be much improved on in some respects, particularly in avoiding the necessity for a considerable length of trestling by keeping on higher ground. And the further important object is uow ar rived at of fixing upon the best location for a bridge across the Columbia river. Engi neer Be in, who has been with Mr. Ward in the mountains as topographer, has charge of the party, and will continue in charge until the arrival of Mr. E. E. Cooper, who has been relieved from duty in Mr...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

BRIE* MENTION. Wiljl strawberries are g>tting ripe. Mayor Sohns arrived lionib 0 n Monday. Useful ami ornamental improvements in city property are prominently nptice»hl e . Portland lias already begun to make prep, •rations for a celebration of the Fourth of July. The Board of County Commissioners will not finish up its btisiiicsr before the end of the week. News about the Vancouver boys up coun try will bo found iu die correspondence from Texas Ferry. The river is -slowly going down, and once more permits bunt landings to be made at the lower dock# The steamer IVaahinyton is to make a trip from I'ortl.iuii to the Cascades on Saturday, starting at ) l\ M. The waifs of John Jaggy's new building arc about completed, and the finishing work will go on rapidly. Mr. J. C. Proebstel has closed up his bus iness at Stoughton, and removed to Vancou ver with his family. Arthur Baker is not yet recovered from his attack of rheumatism, which has been with him two months. The steamer Traveler ...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

A LULLABY. In hsr pretty willow cradle softly swaying, Lulled to slumber by my tender, rytmnie pray iug, Lies my baby, while mv mnther-hoait is saving, '•ijod keep her there!" Keep,oh,keep Mr sunny head upon its pillow. Shining out between its twining withes ol wil- F>w, Rockinj lightly as a bark on fuirv billow, "liod keep her there!" Breathing siTeetU with a bab''s soft pulsation, To the measure of the era le's light vibration, In the cadence of mv parting aspiration. "God keep her there!" — [From"Mntherhood, a Poem." THE SELF-SACRIKirE. It was a Western home—plain and small —the prairies stretching away from it on all sides in green billows. Near it was a little group of maples, their ten der foliage stirring softly in the evening air. There were a few stars out, and low in the west a orescent moon hung, look ing for the nonce like a broken ring, one golden half gone. This thought came to Sarah Vane as she sat in the low porch, with her face resting against her hand. Something...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

The Boston Portias. There was a little ripple of unwonted life during a hearing before the Supreme Court of Massachusetts recently. Four of our seven Supreme Justices were on the bench; a few lawyers were within Ahe bar; possibly half a dozen other peo ple were in the Court, and somo dull question of law was dragging its slow length through the sleepy hours, when on a sudden the door swung back lightly on its hinges, and a young lady tripped into the court room. Behind her came another; then a third and a fourth, some thing after the fashion that sisters, cous ins, and aunts, come tripping on to the stage in the wake of the ruler of the Queen's Navee. They were pretty young ladies, and tliey tiled in, each with a bag in her hand, took seats on a settee, drew forth from the bag each her notebook, and composedly began taking notes. The Court emilod; Chief Justice Gray—the conservative, hard headed and flinty hearted old bachelor whose decisions on some notty points are calling forth s...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 5 May 1881

A Fervent Prayer Meeting. It is said that the scene which pre sented itself on board J. W. & V. Cook's mess-house scow, when she broke from her moorings recently at Sand Island, were almose indescriba ble. Everything breakable on board was broken by the wild pitches which the boat made, and the men fearing that they would go to sea were in a furious state of excitement. It is said that it was one of the largest prayer meetings ever assembled on board of a scow in the Columbia river. There were between ttfty and sixty men oil board at the time. Episcopal Conference.—Bishop Tuttle, of Utah, is on the way over land through Idaho, and will be joined by Rev. Thomas Smith at Union or La Grande. They will go over the mountains together to meet Bishop Morris at Pendleton. The three will then journey to Walla Walla to meet the new bishop of Washington Territory, Rev. J. A. Paddock. There they will meet the Rev. Mr. Wells and the Rev. Dr. Xe vius, where a consultation will be held as to f...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

VOLUME 6. THE INDEPENDENT Is Published every Thursday. J J. BEESON - - - EDITOB. Terms of Subscription: rer annum, when paid in advnnee $ 2 00 If not paid before the expiration of six months 3 r>o Six months, when paid in advance 1 35 Rates of Advertising. One square, ten lines or less, first Inser tion $2 00 Barh subsequent insertion per square.. 1 00 Advertisements inserted three months or longer periods at liberal rates by special eon tract. Legal notices will be charged to the attorney or officer authorizing their insertion. Advertisements sent from a distance, and transient notices, must be accompanied by the easb. Notices of births, marriages and deaths in serted free of charge, obituary notices at reg ular advertising rates. JOSEPH M. FLETCHEIt, Attorney and Counsellor At Law. Office up stairs in Sohns A Schuele's build lag Main street, Vancouver, W. T. wr Particular attention given to convey ancing and the examination of land titles. DOWNING &DEHOFF, Contractors and l...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

MY JOSIAR. Things nas come to a pretty pass The whole wide eouutry over. When every married woman has To have a friend or lover; it ain't the way that I was raised, An' I hain't no desire To have some feller pokin' around Instead of my Josiar. I never kin forget the dav That wetwent out walkin' An' sot down on the river bank An' kep' on hours a talkin'; He twisted up my apron string An' folded it together, An' said he thought for harvest time 'Twas cur'us kind o'weather. The sun went down as we sot there— Josiar seemed uneasy, An' mother she began to call, "Looweezv oh, Loowez)!" An' then Josiar s]M'ke right up. As I was just a startin', An' said, "Loowezy! what's the use Of us two ever partin?" It kind o' took me by surprise, An' \et 1 knew 'twas com in'— I'd heard it all the summer long, In ever? wild bee's hum mi n'; I'd studied out the wav I'd act, But, law! I couldn't do it, I meant to hide mv love from him, But sepms as if he knew it. An' lookin' down into my eyes He must have...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

A Happy Village. I write this from a country village con taining about 1000 inhabitants. It is a lovely little town, nestled on a side hill to break off the raw winds of winter and the hurricanes of summer. When I ar rived this morning it seemed to me as if there could not bo a bad man or solding woman in the villago; but four hours havo passed and I am a wiser man. I came hero to see old Mrs. Brown about a pension she wants from tho Govern ment, and when we had finished our business I said: "I see you havo four churches." "Yes, but we never have any sermons worth listening to." " The men looked intelligent And smart." "Humph! They are regular pokers! There isn't a man in Farmville who knows enough to ask hoot in a horse trade." " But the women look happy," I pro tested. "Then they look what they ain't," she answered. "I don't believe there is a happy woman in the whole villas 3. If you know of the awful carryings on here you wouldn't look for happy wives." "What awful things do the...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

VANCOUVER INDEPENDENT. THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1881. Woodville is the name of a new town in Idaho, some twelve miles dis tant from Spokane bridge, and in all probability will be the county seat of the new couuty of Lahtoh. It will also be the depot for freight and pas sengers for Fort Coeur d'Alene. The new town consists of a store, eating house, two or three saloons, and a brewery in the course of construction. Sprague & Fairweather are about to open a general merchandise store at this point. Commenting on the moulders strike in Portland, the Oregonian says: "When the rules of trades unions or ganize and attempt to maintain a con spiracy, as they often do, to prevent boys from entering honest employ ment and learning useful trades, it is time for employers to remonstrate, as it is the duty of all who have regard to the true interests of society to com mend and sustain them." We fully and emphatically endorse the remark. Give the boys a chance. Edmund Marsh, an old pioneer of 1840, pa...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

BRIEF MENTION. !N. U. Bloomfield's black horse died a few ys since. Dr. J. R. Smith is now recovering from a ry lame foot. There will be a Sunday school picnic from trtland at this place on Saturday. Miu Webster, of ttteilacoom, is in the 9, a guest of Miss Ella Stoughton. The water in the Columbia is 13 feet 6 aches above low water, and on a stand. Wash. Mucltle, of St. Helens, canto up q Saturday to get a breath of fresh air. The government wharves have been made eady for the annual rise of the Columbia. The city assessor has commenced his rorlt, and ia making no favoritism in his lalla. Bishop Paddock and his family arrived in Vancouver last evening, and will leurn to-day. M. R. Hathaway has gone up to Cascades Locks, where he is employed upon govern ment work. Mrs. H. E. Hunt has roturned to Santa Cruz, Cal., from Michigan, and may return to Vancouver. Rev. J. R. Thompson, of Olympia, has gone East to attend the Presbyterian Gen eral Assembly. R. Wolf is piling up much lumber fo...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

Vancouver Independent Official Path of City and Cocntt. Vancouver, Clarke County, Washington Territory. THE KISH AMI IIIS DOUBLE. It happened about A. D. 56 in Ceylon, the island of elephants and ivory, prec ious stones and peacocks. In those days the peasants were as slaves to the princes who made the poor people work without pay. None of them were allowed to have a house with more than one story, or to have it even whitewashed, floored, or have windows in it without the royal permission, and it was a crime for any one except the princes or the king to have chairs with backs to them. What happened at the time spoken of was this. The family of Bakmigaha-ul patagama Sewama, who was a poor la borer in spite of his long name, was in grief because King Yasalalaka Tisso hail said that all masons should help build some new buildings at Anuradhapura, and Sewama, as he will be called for short, was a skillful and ingenious ma son. Sewama and his family were in grief because he was poor, and...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

HER BEbETTING SIN. We chsose to call it a sin, because it can hardly be called a vice, and yet it is vicious and demoralizing—not a venal sin, but one of those sins against the peace and comfort of home which, when allowed to become a habit, renders not ;unlytlie principal ridiculous, but ren ' ders other people uncomfortable. . Mrs. Sawtelle's besetting sin was mirrored in the speech delivered daily, and almost hourly, "I told you so; O, I knew it wonld be so!" When her husband needed comfort —when he had been be traped—when accident had befallen him —no matter what the occasion—no mat ter what the circumstance, from her he only received the inevitable "I told you so; O, I knew it would be so!" And then she was wont to blame him for his stupidity, for his stubbornness in not having listened to her. "Polly, would you believe it, Jack has sold the Jersey stock—the whole of it, twenty-two head, and has used the money in payicg his debts, and I can't—" "I told you so," interrupted his ...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 12 May 1881

Another Conl Strike. While the Wingateand Miller veins of the Carbon Hill Coal Co.'s mine, on the south side of Carbon river, are being worked in a way that daily in creases the capacity of the out-put on that side (having now reached nearly 300 toii9 per day), the tunnel on the opposite side of the river is being driven as rapidly as possible, and has attained a length of about 1,300 feet, passing through several veins of coal, though without cutting any of the Henrv series. Recently Superinten dent Win gate deemed it advisable to test the accuracy of thedirection given to the north side tunnel, by sinking a shaft from above which at a short dis tance from the surface entered a vein of coal 11 feet in thickness, having a pitch and direction of the Henry se ries, as indicated in the croppitigs along the bluff. Computing frorii the angle of incline of this vein, it will be entered at a distance of about 230 feet beyond t lie present face of the north tunnel. It lies between roof and ...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 19 May 1881

VOLUME 6. THE INDEPENDENT Is Published every Thursday. J J. BEESON - - • EDITOR. Terras of Subscription: rer annum, when paid in advance $ 2 00 If not paid before the expiration of six months 2 50 Six months, when paid in advance 1 25 Rates of Advertising. One square, ten lines or less, first inser tion $2 00 Each subsequent insertion per square.. 100 Advertisements inserted three months or longer periods at liberal rates by special con tract. Legal notices will he charged to the attorney or officer authorizing their insertion. Advertisements sent from a distance, and transient notices, must be accompanied by the easli. Notices of births, marriages and deaths in serted free of charge, obituary notices at reg alar advertising rates. JOSEPH M. FLETCHER, Attorney and Counsellor At Law. Officc up stairs in Sohns & Sehuele's buiid- U( Main street, Vancouver, W. T. Particular attention jjiven to convey ancing and the examination of land titles. DOWNING &DEHOFF, Contractors ami ltu...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 19 May 1881

IMPOUNDED. Sunset Rook —almost all New England villages can boast of a Sunset Book— was a low, gray tumulus, crowning the top of the long hill on whose eastern slope lav the hamlet of Teverton. Ham let, I culled it, but it called itself a town, eveu as a dwarf may call himself au old man by virtue of the years he has seen; but for all its century of experience, Teverton was. for size and importance, a hamlet still. Standing on Sunset Rock and looking westward, the first thing that met the eye was a low stone wall, pierced with iron doors, above which rose the headstones and long uncut grasses of a neglected grave-yard. Be yond lay a tract of meadow land, on whose surface granite boulders were more conspicuous than was the crisp, stont herbage that imbedded them. Further still, the land dipped into an orchard-huug valley, bevond which rose a group of nobly formed hills, belted by forests, and raising sharply defined pointed crests to the sky. To north, to south, stretched a far bine ...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 19 May 1881

Bloody Baqfos. The colony of British Honduras is in a state of excitement over the capture and shooting by order of President Banjos,of the Republic of Guatemala,of the Jesuit Sriest, the Kev. Father Gilliet. By the iws of Guatemala, all Jesuits have been banißhed, and should any be caught in the Republic they invariably meet their doom by being shot the prison walls, or out on the plaza, in full view of the entire nopulace. It appears that Father Gilliet visited Guatemala for his health and not as a qlergyman. Never theless, he had scarcely set foot in Liv ingston, wheu, being known by the com mandant, he was arrested, ironed, and thrown into a dungeon to await orders from the capital—Gnatelama City. On the receipt of the telegram ordering his being brought on to the capital for trial, he was divested of nearly all his •lothing and forced to walk barefooted a distance of 100 miles over the moun tains, liis captors using mules an mea* 8 of trarsportation. Arriving after fAree days, ...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 19 May 1881

VANCOUVER INDEPENDENT. THURSDAY, MAY 19, 1881. We have often had occasion to refer to the fact that the state of Oregon gives Washington Territory little or no credit for its productions, and even ignores many of its rights in various Ways. Oregon has even gone so far as to legislate against this Territory, and its courts sustain such laws. The latest case is one in which Oregon lias legislated Washington Territory pi lots out of their calling, and Oregon courts sustain the law , and the result is to practically declare that Wash ington Territory has no right to license u pilot on the Columbia river. A ves sel was at Astoria bound to Portland, having a man duly licensed and qual ified as pilot, under the laws of Wash ington Territory, on board, engaged to pilot the vessel to Portland and re turn. For all that appears, there is no reason to suppose that he was not just as competent as anyone who of fered to perform the service, but an Oregon pilot who desired the fees ten dered himse...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Vancouver independent. — 19 May 1881

BRIEF MENTION. Mr. A. Downing has gone to Boisfort on a short visit to relatives. A branch of the Irish Land League has been formed in Vancouver. Over on the Sound butter is CIJ cents per roll, and only 50 cents here. Portland peddlers have been very numer ous in town for about two weeks. School Supt. Robb is in the Lewis river country this week on official business. Mr. and Mrs. Judy were in tho city Thursday and Friday, visiting friends. The strawberry crop is beginning to ma ture, and will coine into market next week. Bishop Paddock will hold service in St. Luke's Church, Vancouver, on Thursday next. The up river breezes from the ocean have commenced their regular movement for the season. Davidson will move his branch photograph gallery from this placo to Astoria in a day or two. Tho adjourned session of the Board of County Commissioners will commence to morrow. The fishermen at Astoria have struck for 60 cents per fish. They have beeu getting 50 cents. The East Portland M. E. Su...

Publication Title: Vancouver Independent, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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