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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 A MAN OF THE GEORGIA MOUNTAINS BY:JACK ROTTIER ©1989 He is a special breed - R.L. Anderson is a mountain man. He was born in the mountains of N.E. Georgia, near Hiawasee. He lives there and plans to die there with his wife of thirty years, Geneva. They are practically self sufficient. Seldom do they shop at a grocery store - sugar, salt, flour and a few sundries are all they need. They raise their own potatoes and other vegetables in a small garden on their 100-acre farm. R.L. grazes about 60 Black Angus from which he butchers a heafer a year for their meat supply; he has two cows for milk and butter for their table - any extra is sold to neighbors. He raises two pigs every year for their bacon and hams, and keeps a flock of chickens to supply eggs for themselves and neighbors. Several beehives give them an ample supply of honey. R.L. hunts deer, usually on his own property; when the spirit moves him, he takes his two coon hounds out for an even...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. The slogan of my father during our farming years could be capsuled, "No cotton, no money." Without a cotton crop, there would be no money for clothes, no trading at the country store for products not grown on a Georgia farm, such as sugar, coffee, spices, soda, salt, vinegar - and flour and meal, in case no wheat or corn had been grown for processing at Tanner's Mill. Papa spent his winters mapping Cotton Land, Corn Land and Syrup Cane Land. The richest upland acres would be planted in cotton, upon which everything depended. The bottom land, watered by creeks and riverlets, were set aside for corn and syrup cane. Cotton plants, tender in embryo and in the early-growing stages, required moisture. During a drought, we prayed for rain and kept the plants growing by constant plowing and hoeing. From landowner to halves-farmer is a fea...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

-PAtiE'2fO M€)UNt ' BJNITARV', Shoppe - one of the area's largest collections of local mountain music for sale and Harmon's Outlet Center. In the back room of Harmon's Mens Center is a museum of area memorabilia featuring a lot of Indian artifacts and Sidna Allen, Hillsville Courthouse Tragedy information. 10.2 (6.6) We are now in Galax Virginia. We will proceed directly through Galax, continuing to follow highway 58 west. 13.6 (3.4) Here we turn right off of highway 58 west and 221 south on highway 94 north, going toward Fries. 14.7 (1.1) We are now crossing over the high steel bridge over the beautiful New River. Riverwind Outfitters canoe rental is on the right after we cross the bridge. A high steel bridge over the New River. See mileage number 14.7 17.7 (3.0) The New River continues to parallel the road to our left. 18.0 (0.3) Here we will turn right, continuing to follow highway 94 north. State road 274 west goes straight, but we will turn right toward Fries and Ivanhoe, Virgi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

N T _ £ —e» / 25 tO (0.1) Here we bear right on Riverview Street. Directly ahead is an old Norfolk and Western railroad caboose. It has been made into an information center for the Town of Fries and New River State Park. 25.1 (0.1) At this stop sign we will turn left, going back the way we came into the downtown section of Fries. Buster's Place restaurant will be on our left. We parked on the side of the street here and visited Buster's. Charles "Buster" and Doris Mottesheard operate this cafe. Buster is also the town Police Chief and has worked for the Fries police force for the past 19 years. As we went in the door, Buster was behind the cash register and Doris was sitting at the long table in the back. She looked up, smiled and waved an invitation to join her. Doris grew up in Fries and her father, Ben Haga, worked at the mill in the card room. Through the years he invented several things there to make the operation move smoothly. The Town of Fries Information Center. See mileage...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 and order." It helped secure an enjoyable family way of life and assured quality people occupying the community. As much as we were enjoying the conversation, we had to be leaving. Out on the sidewalk, we ran into the mayor, Sanford Byrd. He also was quick to offer a big smile and extend his hand in a hearty handshake. When asked how he was doing, he replied, Still eating around the edges." Sanford Byrd will tell you that he only asked for one job in his whole life. When he was 16 years old, he applied to the mill for a job sweeping floors. That was in 1936. In 1985, 49 years later, Sanford Byrd retired as plant engineer. Today the town of Fries faces a serious dilemma. The mill, faced with a dwindling textile trade, began slowing its operation several years ago. That meant cut backs and a serious loss of jobs. This year the mill closed its doors for the last time. The huge four story structure sits idle for the first time since the turn of the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

BACKROADS (Continued from page 22.) such. You might like to stop a minute and look around. 30.7 (4.2) On our left is the entrance to Shepherds Corner Picnic Area, a part of Mount Rogers National Recreation Area. 31.7 (1.0) Here state road 602 turns right toward Byllesby Dam, another recreation area. 35.7 (4.0) Here we enter Wythe County and leave Carroll County, Virginia. 36.9 (1.2) We are now passing through the small community of Ivanhoe, Virginia. In the last year Ivnhoe has done wonders in its community. They have become very active by generating grants and interest and have accomplished a "Jubilee Park" for community activities and attracted a factory for the employment of its residents, among other things. 38.8 (1.9) On our right, across the river, you can see an old iron furnace stack. 39.3 (0.5) Here state road 619 turns right to Austin ville. We will not turn, but continue straight ahead on state road 94. Austinville was named for Sam Austin, who was born here. He was also ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

,^ le ue irXouuiaiftt) " *^wi'**' mmwrr ' # y Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life Q. January 1989 Volume 5 Number 6 $1.25 PAGE 24 are hidden away on mountain backroads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our B ACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite places with you each month. HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

'Pkotinfaiz jLaurel I must admit I am not writing this article from an interview, but from memory. Not a memory, but many memories of one very special lady, Oma Craig Handy, and whatever flows from my pen and my mind onto this paper will only be a fraction of her personality and experiences. Mrs. Handy isn't a story, she's a whole book. On January 2, 1989, she was 101 years old, over a century of lively wisdom contained in one frail body with a gold capped smile and hair not yet completely gray. Her mother let her sister Lula pick out a name for her, and she chose Oma. Oma Handy, who just about everyone calls "AuntOma", was the youngest of ten children born to Peter and Sallie Wood Craig. Her father fought in the Civil War. She told me the family had one slave during that time period and in the last days of the Civil War, a man offered her father a hundred dollars for the slave. With such a large family, Mrs. Handy's father decided to keep the slave because much help was needed arou...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 Mrs. Handy Continued From Page 1 seemed to exist in their lives. It was more of a contest of wits and wills. Both people having a large portion of both, it was a pretty even contest, but a continuous one none the less. Mr. and Mrs. Handy lived quiet rural lives, but their lives touched everyone who met them. In the book, "Walking with Spring", by George Schaffer, who was the first man to walk the entire length of the Appalachain Trail in 1947, he mentions an encounter with Mr. Handy. (The Appalachian Trail used to go right by the Handy farm.) When we read this book and realized this, we mentioned it to Mr. Handy. Remember now, this was some 40 odd years ago. But, Mr. Handy replied as if it were yesterday, "Oh yes, I remember. He was hiking. It was raining. I was plowing my field next to the road." Mr. Handy had fed Mr. Schaffer a meal, given him a bed for the night and became a page in a book still in print today by the Appalachian Trail Confere...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

Arts & Crafts T\ 7 a_\ *ll T* * * Country Music Festival Antiques VV \/ I ll ill \/ 1 T"11 f\ Chautauqua Summer Festival Outlet Shopping j vXxv/ Y AllVj Yll Historical Museums New River Trail State Park Jefferson National Forest sho. Tower state park "Crossroad of the Blue Ridge" Appalachian Trail Roma V (at the intersection of 1-77 & 1-81) WYTHEVILLE, VIRGINIA Pizzeria & Restaurant Easy Access: r ' I'Hotels •32 Restaurants We Make our own pasta by recipes handed * Charlotte, N.C. 158 miles • Historic Museums down through the family, from generation * Atlanta > Ga. 334 miles • \ i & Walking Tours to generation and offer a wide variety of • Cleveland, Oh. 375 miles For Free , . ... 7 • Nashville, Tn. 403 miles • v ■„ fnTlnT authentic Italian dishes. ... .. „ < ■ w y »i«vui., w fnlnr Rr/whnrp £ti! 11l WvtheShoDDine Plaza • Washington, D.C. 301 miles • c,o„™i c BL,. Color brochure IMI II 11 wytne anopping naza . Pitt...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 Mrs. Handy Continued From Page 2. got as high as the roof of the house. When she did, the top flew back and hit her father in the throat. She said it nearly killed him. For weeks he was unable to speak or swallow solid food. They would soak bread in coffee and put it in his mouth. Euell Handy's father was a bigger than life character. He had a bear skin coat that still hung upstairs in the Handy house along with Oma's side saddle. In her day, a lady never rode astride a horse. It was a part of a social ritual of young people. When a lady rode up, a gentleman would help her get off the horse. I imagine it was the beginning of many a romance. There were many such subtlities in her day. It is a pity we have been robbed of so many excuses for romance in the name of progress. Around 1975, Mrs. Handy fell and broke her hip. She was in the hospital for a long time, and many people thought she would never walk again. Many people thought she would be nur...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

Come Enjoy. WELCOME to Southwest Virginia. Explore trails blazed by such famous pioneers as Daniel Boone. Crisscross the 19 counties on interstate highways or explore winding backroads. All have breathtaking views. Our air is clean and our water is pure. Our people are friendly. Our way of life is slower paced, geared to enjoyment and relaxation. When you come here, you'll feel like you've Location Guide DID YOU KNOW? • The Bristol International Speedway is the The numbers beside the attractions and events listed below correspond to fastest half mile race track in the world. numbers on the map shown below. . The "Grand Canyon of the East" can be " The Va " Hl S hlands Festival in Abingdon is STATE ATTRACTIONS «• Jeff Mathews Museum r* USA. by the American Bus Association. 1 Breaks Interstate Park 19. John Fox Jr. Museum • George C.Scott, Gregory Peck and Patncia } 2 Claytor Lake 20. Rock House Museum Neal and many more well known actors have Re i h ' 3. Clinch Mountain Wildlife Mgt....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. In the 1920's we never had more than one cow in the pasture, and she endeared herself to us as our "only-cow". We could hardly have survived without milk and butter, which Mama extracted to the last drop from the large swelling udder of our cow. A cow might stay with us a long time, and then Papa would trade her off for a "good milker," or for a cow he believed might give more milk than the one we had. A new cow meant getting used to her name, for whatever name she answered to at a former owner's house, that was her name at our house. Each cow - while she was ours - had somewhat the status of an only-child. Trading for a new cow was always an eventful day, but one "trading day" stands out above all the others. In 1921 Papa traded for a cow at Belmont, Georgia, a smoky railroad hamlet to the we...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

During the spring rains of 1925, the streams were loaded to capacity with the usual debris and winter ice. In the Pinnacle coal camp on Crane Creek, in the McComas area, of Mercer County, West Virginia, the water became trapped behind a huge mountain of mine waste known as a bone pile. When the mountain moved, it swallowed seventeen family homes. At about nine o' clock at night the local telegrapher intercepted a message on his railroad wire "Send help, all houses destroyed, all believed dead, looting." The agent read aloud in the Justice of the Peace's office, assembly center of lawmen in the hills. My papa, W. S. "Bill" Reynolds, a deputy sheriff of three months standing and Charles William James Walker, the first white man born in Matoaka were there. Pa and CWJ Walker were arch enemies. It was quickly decided that the new deputy was obliged to go. The wire implied urgency. As Papa suited up for the wild ride, through dark mountain gaps, across a red-dog road, and hazardous stream...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 Jilted By: Carl "Skinny" Rowland ©1989 If you like Skinny's poems, you might like to order his book, "Truths, Lies & Otherwise", 45 pages, $5.00 (includes postage and handling). Order from Skinny Rowland, 1002 Breckenridge, Helena, Montana 59601. All books autographed. Now a long long time ago, back early in my life, I once came almighty close, to taking on a wife. I had on my tux and tophat, and white spats on my shoes, and was walking to the church, where we'd exchange "I do's". But just as I arrived there, she came outside and ran, and got into a buggy, holding to another man. Well then he cracked the whip, and the horses gave a lurch, leaving me to stand there, on the doorsteps of the church. So I went and shed those city clothes, and saddled up my roan, and headed out for open space, riding all alone. Then I found the place I sought, a cliff a mile high, and a tree grew on the edge, with a limb stretched to the sky. And down bel...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

Down through the years, the lowly potato has had great historical significance. If it weren't for the potato famine in Ireland, many of our Irish ancestors would never have come to America. There were a lot of the Irish who settled in the Blue Ridge and perhaps their blessing enriches the rich, dark mountain soil to grow some of the world's finest potatoes. The history of one entire community in Southwest Virginia started with planting potatoes. There is a historical marker in Tazewell County that reads: "Site of James Burke's Garden. In this fertile soil James Burke, who discovered this hunters paradise, planted potato peelings by the camp fire of a 1748 surveying party led by Colonel James Patton. The next year a fine crop of potatoes were found here so the name Burkes Garden was jokingly given. On the bluff east of Station Creek, Burke built a cabin where he lived from 1753 to 1756 when he was driven out by the Shawnees." It's almost the time of year to start thinking about garde...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 Tales And Trails BY Spike Knuth INFORMATION OFFICER VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF GAME AND INLAND FISHERIES Virginia's owls are quiet hunters that attack with sudden swiftness on silent wings. They hunt by sound or by sight with special sensitive ears and eyes that are specially designed for low light conditions. In addition to their extraordinary vision and hearing, they have soft, downy plumage enabling almost sound-less flight. Owls seek seclusion during the day, although some northern owls - the hawk owl, snowy owl and short-eared owl - will hunt in daylight. Both the eyes and ears of owls are remarkable. In the darkness their pupils can be dilated almost to the width of the eye allowing much light in, like the widest opening of a camera lens. The pupils contract to a small speck when exposed to intense light. The eyes of owls have more rods and cones (receptor cells) which renders them color blind but gives them superior vision in poor light. The...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

I, Nellie Jewell Howard Wilson, was born on September 3, 1910 at Riner, Virginia, Montgomery County. I was born and raised on a fruit farm near Riner. My father was Mr. Charlie Jewel of near Riner and my mother was born near Carroll County in Floyd, Virginia. Her maiden name was Annie Susan Hatcher. Out family were two boys and five girls. We children had to walk to school and had a hard way trying to get an education when we were young. When our father bought a baby Overland car, we had a better way to go. I was the youngest girl in our family. The winters were awful hard in those days and made it unusually hard for everyone that lived in the country, but they were the good old days. We enjoyed the long hikes and would go to the neighbors' houses and have candy pullings and bean stringings. I remember when my father would take us children out on walks to hunt little young chestnuts that grew up in the woods. When chestnuts dropped off in the fall, some stayed buried in the ground a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1989 The Mail Box To the Editor: My ancestors came from Patrick County [Virginia]. Family legend has it that one of them, a Stanley, discovered a silver mine in the Pinnacles of Dan. He used the silver to decorate the stocks of old long rifles which he made, never told where the mine was, and no one else ever discovered it. This ancestor died in 1879. One of my aunts says that every child in school with her claimed an ancestor who was the only person to ever discover the silver mine. I'm hoping the readers can send me stories about a sliver mine in the Pinnacles of Dan. I am writing a family newsletter, and this information would flesh out a rather scanty story. Please answer the questions who, what, when, where, how and why as far as possible, and tell where you heard the story. I would also like to know more about the Pinnacles and its dam, since this also figures in our family history. Sincerely, Sandra G. Holland 529 Oakhaven Pleasanton, Texas 7...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1989

GENE^L QGY | GENEALOGY I am researching Moore/May berry. John P. Moore married Rachel Mayberry, daughter of George Mayberry and his wife Christina Kimberline. George, son of Frederick Mayberry and wife Barbarah (last name unknown) b. 1751 NJ, d. 11 Nov. 1848 Periy/Bobb County, Alabama. Married 5 January 1782 Bedford County, Va. George's brother Henry Mayberry died Hickman County, Tn. Believe George moved to Tn. then Al. Seeking any information on John P. (possibly Pinckney) Moore. I am interested in corresponding with and sharing information with anyone doing research on this May berry family. Judy Moore Leonard 1124 Linganore Place Charlotte, NC 28203 T "nd Subscribe Today or * J^durel Send a Friend a Gift to The Mountain Laurel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life w U^? Cri,3erS: , 1 Year (12 Issues) Only SIO.OO With each subscription well send a J FREE Complimentary Copy to one of your friends. Just list their ? Vparc (*>d Onlv 00 name and address below or use a separate s...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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