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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 The Farmers Market (Continued from page 14) Montgomery County. Brushy Mountain. Davis, McCraw Realty. 540-674-4864. ROANOKE — Colonial with wrap porch. Rural setting. Three bedrooms, three baths, AC. Excellent condition. 540-077-0724. TWENTY + WOODED ACRES — Stream, no mobiles, lake rights, $27,500. Marshall Thackston, Statewide Realty. 804-392-6163. LEE'S NECK FARM — 5 acres, building lots, owner financing, $ 12,000 and up. C-21 Country Estates. 800-321-6673. WATERFRONT HOME — 1.2 acres fronting Davis Creek. Three bedrooms, two baths. C-21 Country Estates. 800-321-6673. I'M LOOKING — For the bed and back fenders for a 1940 Podge pick up truck. 804-561 - 1137. 1985 FORD — F-600 truck with 12 foot refer body, single phase 220 volt stand by. Excellent condition, $5,595 or best offer. 703-321-7562. 1976 |EEP CHEROKEE — Engine with rebuilt transmission. 804-492-3234 $ 1,500 or best offer. 1991 DODGE DYNASTY — $3,500. 1984 Ford LTD $300. 1974 Cadillac deVille $1,500. Prices ne...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

HWhat is the advantage of buying your Health Insurance through the Virginia Farm Bureau? ADVANTAGE #1 The Best Value for your $ You can save money and receive better coverage. "I saved our organization $2700.00 per year in premiums while offering our staff better group coverage." E.C.B. Rocky Mount, Va. " We are just tickled with our new health coverage and are saving over $3000.00 a year in premiums." Mr. and Mrs. D.T., Lawrenceville, VA. With over 30 plans, you choose the plan that fits your budget... and your needs. ADVANTAGE #2 Personal Service / * Over 100 Farm Bureau Offices to provide you convenient, and personal attention for your Claims processing or coverage questions " s ''" 5^ ADVANTAGE #3 Comprehensive Insurance Programs JijHHL fiiSm j If you are under 65 — Individual and Group Plans t" If you are over 65 — Medicare Supplement and Long Term Care plans v If you are a small businessman — coverage for 2-90 employees. ■>'< The Farm Bureau also offers D...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News. Volume 58, Number 3 Despite challenges, young farmer is living his dream Editor's Note: This is the third in a series of articles about the challenges confronting Virginia's present and future generations of farms and farm families. By CHRISTY MCKAY Special to the Farm Bureau News HANOVER—When most young folks are fleeing the family farm for urban jobs, a Hanover County man is one of the few following in his father's footsteps. Although there was no family farm to hand down from father to son, Kevin Engel is determined to make a living from agriculture. Growing up on a King William County farm that his father managed, Engel knew he wanted to be a farmer. Since grade school, he said he couldn't wait to get home and work on the farm. "It's the challenge of growing crops. Agriculture is one of the most vital functions of humanity," said the 38-year-old. Engel and his wife, Denise, started renting land in 1991. Renting has become a trend among young farmers, he said, b...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News Farmer travels U.S. to learn about new grains (Continued from page 1) domestic health food supplements to special sauces shipped to Japan. Wheat straw is shipped to Pennsylvania for compost for mushroom farms. "Farmers have to keep learning, keep challenging ourselves and trying to survive in agriculture by thinking outside the box that farmers find themselves in," he said. Engel said he travels the country to learn about new grains and to network with other growers for specialty crops that bring higher value. Soybean candles burn cleaner than wax; clothes can be made from corn starch; and future human healthcare could come from food products. For example, he said, instead of going to the doctor, future immunizations could come from eating breakfast foods. The problem with specialty crops, though, is growers need to have consistent yields despite Virginia's unpredictable and inconsistent rain. That's where the Engels have an advantage. With farm acres as scattered a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 Estate taxes still threatening family farms Virginia has a proud farming heritage that dates back to the 1600s. Farmers for nearly four centuries have tilled the rich soils of the Old Dominion, raised livestock on its green rolling hills and provided a wonderful bounty of food and fiber for a growing population. And the legacy continues. Hundreds of farms are still being operated today by the same families whose ancestors cleared the land and cultivated the very first crops In the 17th and 18th centuries. In fact, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation found that at least 115 farms in Virginia had been continuously operated by the same family for more than 200 years. More recently the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services found that at least 418 farms in the state have remained in the same family for nore than 100 years. But this sort of proud her- Baby boomers are living evidence that pesticides are safe for world The Baby Boom generation holds a lot of d...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Irradiation may provide longer shelf life for meat RICHMOND—Zapping meat with low-level gamma rays could give it a longer shelf life and reduce the amount of food wasted in America, which is about 96 billion pounds annually. Killing food pathogens with gamma rays is known as irradiation and is used in 40 countries but not in the United States. U.S. environmental groups and some organic food growers have opposed irradiation, and it has been hotly debated over the past few years. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman announced recently that the government will allow raw meat and raw meat products to be irradiated to reduce contamination with micro-organisms and improve food safety. The proposed rule, announced in February, will take effect after a 60-day comment period. Irradiation is the only known method of completely eliminating the E. coli bacteria in raw meat, and it can also reduce the presence of listeria, salmonella and Campylobacter. All ir...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 Some cities are polluting state's waterways By JOHNNA MILLER VFBF Video Producer RICHMOND-People who try to blame hog producers for polluting Virginia's waterways should point the finger at somebody else, agriculture and environmental officials said. Some cities, like Richmond, Lynchburg, Alexandria and Covington, pollute the state's streams, rivers and lakes. "We never put point source pollution into streams, but some municipalities do," said John Parker, program director for the Virginia Pork Industry Board. "The bottom line is, hog farmers are getting the blame for water pollution, but we've never once had a lagoon spill." Golden leaf growers get crash course By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND —Some Virginia tobacco producers are getting a crash course in business basics. A pilot program began with about 12 Southside Virginia farmers from Charlotte, Halifax and Mecklenburg counties in February at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation headquarters with...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News Slope meter warns of possible tractor mishaps By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND —Farmers now have two more tools to put in their safety kits—a slope degree indicator and new, improved Slow Moving Vehicle decals. Both safety devices are being offered through the Virginia Farm Bureau Safety Program at substantial savings. "The SMV emblems and the slope indicator will save our members money, and give them another safety device to help create a safer workplace," said VFB Safety Coordinator Bruce Stone. Tractor rollovers can kill Statistics show that many farm deaths occur during tractor rollovers, and one of the best ways to change those figures is to use a Rollover Protective Structure and wear a seatbelt, Stone said. "The slope degree indicator may alert the farmer to a problem and help prevent a rollover to begin with. "A ROPS and seatbelt will give you protection if you ignore the slope indicator and roll over," he added. Slope degree indicators...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 Keep your life in balance, motivator says By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist BRISTOL —Life is a wheel that constantly needs balancing. That's what motivational speaker Donna R. Tyson told a record number of farm women attending this year's Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Statewide Women's Conference March 7-9. The wheel of life contains six spokes that represent each per- son's career, social life, physical well being, financial situation, spirituality and emotions, Ms. Tyson said. When one spoke is weak, the whole wheel breaks down. "All of life is about balance," she explained to the 266 women at the conference. "Love what you do ... be there wholly, but don't ever let that job become who you are." She encouraged the women to make sure each spoke is equally as strong. "When you can't control what's happening around you, you can control what happens within," said the 43-year-old mother of three. The way to do that is to put emphasis on all areas of your life, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News Farm expansions are necessary to make a living By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND —If family farms still had only a few cows and chickens as they did decades ago, then they might also have to rely on outdoor privies and handcranked well water. That's an observation from Dr. Jim Pease, Extension farm management specialist with the Virginia Cooperative Extension in Blacksburg. For most American farmers, surviving in today's global agriculture market is a matter of producing more hogs or more corn for less pay per pound or bushel, Pease said. a The American public is not willing to pay for the cost to produce the raw products, and the result is you're seeing an industry being destroyed by apathy. Some family farms in Virginia have 5,000 acres, or rows and rows of hog houses or poultry houses, said Spencer Neale, an assistant director of Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Commodities/Marketing Department. Of course, Virginia has hundreds of small family farm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 Right to Farm Act protects modern agriculture By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Without the Right to Farm Act of 1994, many farmers wouldn't have the flexibility to participate in modern agriculture. The law helps protect farmers from nuisance suits filed over noise and dust. It also protects them from unfair treatment by local officials when they are considering land use. Lawmakers introduced three unsuccessful bills during the 1999 session of the Virginia General Assembly that would have weakened the Right to Farm. A number of citizen groups also rallied behind the lawmakers who introduced the bills. "I don't see citizens leaving the Right to Farm alone as long as local governments keep using it to mislead their citizens regarding control of farm practices," said Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. The reason county governments do that is because many county officials would like for agricult...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News Lawmakers approve new state agronomists (Continued from page 1) "Our members really came through by contacting their representatives when it was needed and explaining the farmer's side of many issues. Thanks to their dedication and hard work we were able to win some victories on many priority issues and dodge a few bullets aimed at farming," Hiatt said. Farm Bureau efforts helped kill several bills that had set their sights on weakening Virginia's Right to Farm Act. That law protects farms from unfair restrictions and lawsuits. Senate Bill 733 would have revoked Right to Farm protections for livestock operations of 1,000 animal units or more. House Bill 1907 tried to remove those protections for small hog operations. HB 1923 would have changed the definition of "a farm" to the extent that many of Virginia's livestock operations would no longer be considered farms. "Our members are the reason we were able to successfully defend Right to Farm," said Wilmer Stoneman, s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 Variety is truly the spice of life on this farm By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist CUMBERLAND—The school of hard knocks has taught Jean and Donald Bishop that farming from A to Z is the key to success. The Bishops grow everything from apples to zucchini, and just about everything in between. To make it work, they're constantly changing the mix. a So many Virginia farmers are just locked into what their daddy did and they see change as a bad thing. —Dr. Charlie O'Dell On the Bishop's 70-acre farm, they double- and triple-crop, allowing them to harvest 75 acres of fruits and vegetables. They grow apples, bananas, broccoli, cabbage, cantaloupes, collard greens, grapes, kale, okra, peaches, spinach, squash and strawberries, which they sell both locally and to wholesalers. The Bishops also raise 26,000 layer hens for Tyson Foods, and they sprout seedlings in their three greenhouses for much of their produce. Mrs. Bishop also grows lush ferns and cala lilies, which s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News Wheat acreage increases (Continued from page 7) acreage increased from 241,042 to 257,063. The number of farms produc- ing peanuts fell from 935 to 702, with peanut acreage dropping by nearly 20,000 acres to 74,867. Production slipped from 258.5 million pounds to 190.5 million Agriculture Census Highlights The latest Virginia agriculture census indicates the Old Dominion has 8.2 million acres of farmland. Of that, 2.5 million acres are used for harvested cropland. Here are other numbers from the 1997 census, released in February: 1997 \992 Total farms 41,095 42,222 Average farm acreage 200 197 Beef cow farms 21,753 22,519 Milk cow farms 1,671 2,369 Farms that sell hogs 823 1,596 Broiler farms 671 640 Broilers sold 258 million 201 million Tobacco farms 5,870 8,444 Pounds of tobacco sold 115 million 113 million Orchard acreage 27,650 32,963 Federal aid comes just in time for dairy farmers By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—The price Virginia dairy farmers are...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 Hog industry decreasing in Old Dominion By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RlCHMOND—Virginia's hog industry has been decreasing in the number of hogs and hog operations since 1980 and is now a fraction of the size of North Carolina's. Virginia's 1997 Census of Agriculture, released in phases in February and March, shows a decline in the hog industry from 1992 to 1997. The number of farms that sold hogs dropped from 1,596 to 823 during that time. Virginia producers sold 715,452 hogs in 1992 and 710,320 in 1997. North Carolina has 9.7 million hogs, while Virginia has fewer than 420,000 at any given time, said Spencer Neale, assistant director of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Commodities/Marketing Department. lowa has 14 million hogs. Over the years, concerned citizens have tried to negatively compare Virginia's hog industry with North Carolina's industry, which suffered a major setback in 1995 when storms caused hog waste lagoons to overflow and leak into waterw...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. > Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) » Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the STK of each month preceding the publication month. I Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. I Ads MUST include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the sth.) NAME: MEMBER NO.: COUNTY: ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: Z...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

April 1999 The Farmers Market (Continued from page 14) WATERFRONT - Northern Neck, Nomini. new two story, two acre, broad view, pier, lift $335,000. 804-493-8774. PLACID BAY — $70,000. Owner financing available. Two bedrooms, two baths, living room, dining room, washer, dryer, refrigerator, central heat, AC, completely furnished except for one new bedroom, shed. 804-224-9634. 19 + ACRE FARM - Nicely renovated, 10 rooms, barn, out buildings, stream, $285,000. 540-943-2715. URBANNA - Secluded, unique +/-3800 square feet, two story, five bedrooms, 3.5 baths, stables. $895,000. Abbitt Realty. 804-693-7200. RENTAL - Mobile home, two bedrooms, two bath, two decks, wooded lot, Elizabeth City, NC, $350 month. 703-368-0889. VICTORIA - 94 acres, eight room house, garage, on road. Century 21 Dominion Properties. 800-553-5454. CAPECOD HOUSE - 8 miles from Blue Ridge Parkway, Southwest, VA. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths. Terre Goodman, 800-529-9942, 540-238-1001. EASTERN SHORE - TWo story, garage, acreage...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1999

HWhat is the advantage of buying your Health Insurance through the Virginia Farm Bureau? ADVANTAGE #1 The Best Value for your $ You can save money and receive better coverage. "I saved our organization $2700.00 per year in premiums while offering our staff better group coverage." E.C.B. Rocky Mount, Va. "We are just tickled with our new health coverage and are saving over $3000.00 a year in premiums." Mr. and Mrs. D.T., Lawrenceville, VA. With over 30 plans, you choose the plan that fits your budget... and your needs. ADVANTAGE #2 Personal Service Over 100 Farm Bureau Offices to provide you convenient, and personal attention for your Claims processing or coverage questions ADVANTAGE #3 Comprehensive Insurance Programs mHHL Mjf If you are under 65 — Individual and Group Plans If you are over 65 — Medicare Supplement and Long Term Care plans mggmaiK If you are a small businessman — coverage for 2-90 employees. S The Farm Bureau also offers Dental, Life, Auto and Homeowners Insurance. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau . News Volume 58, Number 4 Sagging farm prices tied to global economy By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—Asian countries don't have enough money to buy their usual share of U.S. farm products. Europeans are trying to ban American farmers' genetically modified crops, as well as beef from cattle produced with growth hormones. Brazil has replaced acres of coffee plants with acres of soybeans and that country, along with Argentina, has produced a bumper crop. This contributes to the world's oversupply of grains. It all adds up to a bad farm economy for Virginia and the rest of the nation. Yet, much of the rest of the U.S. economy is bustling. Many newcomers are investing in the stock market, sending activity to record highs. Unemployment and inflation are low. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan told bankers in March the weakened agriculture economy is "one of the more notable soft spots" in an otherwise strong U.S. economy. However, he added, American farme...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1999

Farm Bureau News Livestock producers restrict antibiotic use By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—Americans have the safest, most abundant food supply in the world, but that could change if federal officials overly restrict the use of antibiotic drugs for livestock. The Food and Drug Administration has proposed new guidelines that would restrict the use of antibiotics in livestock production. FDA officials say in a report that bacterial resistance to antibiotic drugs raises questions about the role of such drugs when used in foodproducing animals. Some groups are concerned that putting antibiotics in animal feed, even as a livestock growth promoter, could encourage bacteria to become drug-resistant. But livestock producers have already placed their own restrictions on antibiotic use. "The old days of giving a cow a shot of penicillin and seeing if she gets better are gone," said Dr. Robert Franck, a veterinarian. Veterinarians treat sick cattle in a way that's based on ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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