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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Diet. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Diet. Editors Press:—"Weave the tissue of the organisms out of material that will not tear," is a sentence that occurs in my last communication, and as it may appear not to sufficiently explain the way to avoid death by hemorrhage or ulceration of the lungs, something further upon the subject may be admissable. To be plain, the diet of the majority of Americans, and of some others, is largely composed of substances from which too much of the fibrous constituents have been extracted; or, in other words, they live too much upon fine flour and fatty or oily substances. Then, with reference to the use of pork, there must have been some good reason for the Israelitish exclusion of the swine as food. Modern science supports the position also. It requires five hours to digest such food, so that those who take three meals per day, each of which consists in part of the ''unclean thing" in some shape, either as shortening or otherwise, require fifteen hours out of the twenty-four for constant...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Effect of Stimulants on the System. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Effect of Stimulants on the System. The, effects of alcohol on the healthy human body have recently been carefully observed by Drs. Parkes and Wollowiez, of the British army. One or two fluid ounces of the stimulant, per day, increased the appetite; while four or more ouncefe sensibly diminished it; the effect was more marked with brandy than with rectified spirits. Digestion was not, however, impeded or the temperature lowered; but though there were strong feelings of warmth in the stomach, face, etc., it is not clear that the temperature was increased. No direct effect upon the nervous system was shown by the elimination of phosphoric acid, caused by the action of the brain; but the physical state of the body changed with the size of the dose; narcotism being strongly developed when the first very small amounts were exceeded. The effect upon the heart was extraordinary. The experiments extended over a period of twenty-six days; and during eight of them, when water alone wap drank,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Dyspepsia and its Remedies. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Dyspepsia and its Remedies. Dr. A. O'Leary lectured recently at Cooper Institute, New York, on "Dyspepsia." Indications of disturbance of the stomach are. he said, caused by the fermentation cf food. No one should eat cabbage boiled with meat, or onions with steaks, as they create biliousness. Cabbage is one of the best articles of food when it is cooked properly. It should be boiled in pure water. As a cure for dyspepsia he recommended a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, which neutralizes the acid in the stomach. The causes of dyspepsia are the use of butter, grease, gravy, and eating too hastily. Dyspepsia does not come from large eating. Those afflicted with it should take a short sleep after dinner. The liver has much to do with dyspepsia. Whenever the white of the eye shows a yellow tinge, it proceeds from the liver; tenderness in the pit of the stomach is an indication of a diseased liver. A slight pain under the right ribs and back to the shoulder blade, also proceeds from th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Labor Conducive to Long Life. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Labor Conducive to Long Life. In view of the short duration of life entailed by some occupations, it must be regarded as a consoling, yea, a sublime fact, that labor in general does nt)t tend to shoi-ten life; but, on the contrary, by strengthening health, lengthens life; while on the other hand, idleness and luxury are productive of the same results as the most unhealthy occupations. Dr. Guy, an Englishman, in calculating the average duration of life in the wealthy classed, arrived at the very surprising result with regard to adults, that the higher the position in the social scale, the more unlimited their means, the less the probability of a long life. Wo have so long been accustomed to consider the possession of riches as the best guarantee for physical welfare, that many will be surprised to hear that "the probability of the duration of life lessens, with regard to adults in each class of the population, in the same degree as the beneficial impulso for occupation is lacking. If...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Weekly Crop. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Our Weekly Crop. The first step, speakiug generally, in farming is to break up the land, and on our first page this week is shown an improved Plow with which this first step can be takon.it is affirmed, with tho greatest ease over the hardest and most uneven ground. After viewing the manner in which this works, we take the second step in the library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress that we may learn to proceed in tho safest and surest paths. Onr third step is down tho coast, to Lower California, and back to Half Moon Buy. Then we walk into the General Land Office to inquire about Land Matters. We travel on merrily past the haymakers who toll us of the Philosophy of Haymaking, and paddle along the canals to study the Philosophy of Irrigation. And with a rapid stride wo step hither and thither to different parts of the coast, gleaning Agricultural Note* by the wayside. We cast a backward glance at a giant among men, and read of the deeds of George Peabody. We look again at the pr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Ageing Wine—An Important Invention. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Ageing Wine—An Important Invention. One of the greatest drawbacks in the manufacture of wine is the length of time required to givo " age" to the product. One and two years is the time usually considered necessary for " ageing" to an extent suflicient to determine the true character of the wine, so that it can be advantageously placed in the market. And any additional delay beyond that time is considered equivalent to adding a good rate of interest to tho value of the product. Time is money. Now if we can introduce a process which can be applied to the wine, say within two or throe months from tho time the juice is expressed, which will immediately givo to it the " age" of two, three or four years, that process is worth the interest on the original cost of the wine for the time so saved, added to the cost of storage, insurance, etc. It moreover releases the amount of capital otherwise stored up in cellars and vaults, and allows it to be put to active use, whereby it may earn more th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Visit from the Commissioner of Agriculture. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Visit from the Commissioner of Agriculture. Whilo at the Bureau of Agriculture in Washington, recently, we were pleased to learn that tho Commissioner of that Department, Hon. Horace Capron, intends visiting California, and probably Oregon and other parts of tho Pacific coast, during July or August of this season. Ho will be accompanied by the better half of his household, and wo bolievo will make us quite a stay, and one which will result in much benefit to our coast, and tho cause of agriculture at large. Wo hopo soon to announce moro particularly tho time of his coming. In the meantime, we hope our agricultural friends will prepare to give him a hearty welcome, and all the assistanco and information possible in furtherance of the objects of his visit. He will bo here in just the season to attend our various State and District Agricultural Fairs, and tho Grand Industrial Exhibition which will come off in this city undor the auspices of the Mechanics' Institute. Returned. —Mr. Dcwo...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS & INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

PATENTS & INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Fbom Official Rkpohtb to DEWEY h CO., D. 8. and i'omkion l'atknt auknth, and publiihkks of the Scientific I'hebh.] Foe the Week Ending Jdne 6th. Furnace for Roahttno Ores.—John P. Arey, Georgetown, Col. Tor. Buckle.— George F. Stephens, Portland, Or., assignor to himself and John Nation, same place Sewing-Machine. —Hannah O. Suploo and John H. Moonoy, San Francisco, Col. BBPXATnra Ordnance. —Alfred 11. Townsend, Georgetown, Colorado Territory. Furnace for Boasting Ores of the Precious Metals. —Jonas Sely Akin, ltye Patch, Nov. Manufaturb of Pneumatic Gas. —Homer Bloom field, San Francisco, Col. ; I'AitiiOß-SKATE. — Oliver Benjamin Oakley, San Francisco, Cal.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Sacramento Seminary. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Sacramento Seminary. The commencement oxercises of this popular school, under tho charge of Prof. Perry and wife, assisted by an able corps of teachers, took place in T«mple Hall, Odd Felowß Temple, lust week and was a great day in the history of the seminary. The beautiful hall was filled with nearly a thousand persons, representing the parents and guardians of tho pupils, from all parts of the State, with the many friends of education and tho seminary both in and out of the citr. Dr. Carr, of tho State University, delivered a most massive and brilliant address on tho importance of female education, claiming for woman the right of high montiil culture, asking for her no change of sphere, no masculine endowment, but tho privilogo of being clerer as well as good, and the acquisition of that varied power and influence that education can give. Tho exercises of tho occasion wero in the following order;—Music — Instrumental duet, by Misses Lorenz and Lindsay, Prayer ; Music — Anthem, " P...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Editorial Notes Eastward.—7. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Editorial Notes Eastward.—7. The Palisades—On the C. P. R. R. Our lively friend, the Hnmboldt, whom wo have been following so long, has piepared for us a mighty path. Some six miles before coming to the town of Palisado, wo saw some high cliffs and rugged crests which excited our admiration as we rushed through Twelve-Mile Canon, where the cutting is some of the heaviest we had ever seen. But all this vanished from our sight, and we entered the famous Palisades. Here our watery companion has been wearing away the rocks to a fearful extent, so that we shudder as we look upward from the platform of the car at the 57.1 mllr*a from San Francisco—Altitude 4,800 fret. jagged and overhanging cliffs, which threaten at every moment to fall upon and annihilate us. They received their name from the resemblance they bear to the renowned upright walls of rock on the Hudson river. At several points in the side of the cliffs, we see large hollows, or caves, where the rock has crumbled and fallen a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Breeding Gold Fish. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Breeding Gold Fish. A correspondent of the Scottish Farmer says:—A friend of mine some years ago constructed a tank about sixteen feet long, and between four and five feet broad, by three feet deep, which he stocked with fish, but they did not breed. I suggested to him that gold fish were very fond of eating their own young, and that if he wanted to breed fish ho must have the means of separating the old from the young. I also advised him to stretch across the tank a partition of wire-work, with a mesh small enough to prevent the large fish from pushing through, at the same time giving the young fry an opportunity of getting into a secure place. This answered the purpose perfectly, and they bred in numbers. Gold fish should be kept in water of an even temperature—neither too warm nor too cold. A very small quantity of the white of an egg, broken up into minute particles, is sufficient daily food for some half-dozen fish. To this a very small quantity of pounded vermicelli may be add...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
About Smoked Babies. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

About Smoked Babies. Israel Smudge is a highly respected and respectable deacon of "our church." Ho has been a pious, man all his life. Quite scholarly, too, is he, after a fashion of his own; and like all great thinkers, he possesses a "hobby," which he rides vigorously to and fro. His hobby is, curiously enough, Infauticide. If you should hear him rave about the alarming prevalence of this crime and scan the statistics which he has accumulated concerning it, you would look upon the present generation of women as little less than murderers. Israel naturally abhors the Sixteenth Amendment, and clamors loudly for a law which shall inflict the severest penalty upon any female who shall, in any way, intentionally quench the tiniest spark of life, intrusted to her care. Israel's wife is a gentle Quakeress. Of course their homo is poetically and literally fragrant with human blossoms. A stranger on entering might suppose it to be an embryouic foundling asylum, especially as the "wee bit ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Bottle of Oil. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

The Bottle of Oil. Onco upon a timo there lived an old gentleman In a large house. He had servants and everything he wanted, yet he was not happy, and when things did not go as ho wished, he was cross. At last his servants left him. Qnito out of temper, he went to a neighbor with the story of his distresses. "It seems to me," said tho neighbor, "it would be well for you to oil yourself a little." "To oil myself!" "Yes, I will explain. Somo time ago, one of tho doors in my house creaked. Nobody therefore liked to go in or out by it. One day I oiled its hinges, and it has been constantly used by everybody since." "Then you think I am like your creaking door," cried the old gentleman. "How do you want mo to oil myself?" "Thats au easy matter," said the neighbor." "Go homo and engage a servant, and when ho does right, praise him. If, on the contrary, he does souiethiug amiss, do not be cross; oil your voice and your words with the oil of love." The old gentleman wont home and no harsh o...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wonders of Insect Life. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Wonders of Insect Life. The Sting of a Bee. In our last number wo illustrated and described the eye of a bee. To-dny wo continue our remarks upon the wonders of insect life, by giving a representation of the sting of a bee, greatly magnified. A cambric needle, magnified to the extent of the sting herewith shown, would appear comparatively blunt. It takes a very powerful microscopo, however, to give anything but a very sharp point to the sting of a beo. The point, it Avill bo noticed, is barbed, like an arrow, which accounts for the fact that the bee generally leaves his sting in the wound. The letters b b and c indicato the poison sacks, without which the sting would be as harmless as a slight prick from a noodle. The poison is ejected through a little tube, which is represented by a fine black line running along the center of the barb, and is of an acid nature, for which reason the best application for alleviating the pain is an alkali, such as soda, tobacco water or something of t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
An Awful Story. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

An Awful Story. There was once an awful little girl who had an awful way <>f Having " awful" to everything. She lived in an awful house, in an awful street, in an awful village, which was an awful distanco from any other awful place. Slio wont to an awful school, where she had an awful teacher, who gave her awful lessons out of awful books. Every day sho was so awful hungry that she eat an awful amount of food, so that she looked awful healthy. Her hat was awful small and her feet were awful large. Sho wont to an awful church and her minister was an awful preacher. When she took an awful walk she climbed awful hills, and when sho got awful tired she sat down under an awful tree to rest herself. In snmmer she found the weather awful hot, and in winter awful cold. When it didn't rain there was an awful drouth, and when the awful drouth was over there was an awful rain. So that this awful girl was all the time in an awful state, and if sho don't get over saying "a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Stretch It a Little. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

Stretch It a Little. A little girl and her little brother were on their way to the store tho other morning. The grass on the common was white with frost, and tho wind was very sharp. They were both poorly dressed; but tho little girl hud a sort of a cloak over her, which she seemed to have outworn. As they walked briskly along, sho drew tho boy closer to her, and said, " Come under my cloak, Johnny." "It isn't big enough for both, sinter." "Then I will try and stretch it a little." And they were soon as close together and as warm as birds in the same nest. What a lesson! How many shivering bodies, and sad hearts, and weeping eyes there are in the world, just because people do not stretch their comforts a little beyond themselves. Reversing the Cahe. —" Mamma," said Ivan, showing a rent, "If a fairy were to turn me into a biff lady and you into a little boy, I wouldn't whip that little boy for tearing his panta." Always moderate, as far as you can, the unkimlneßß which is unkind to o...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 24 June 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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