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Title: Wellington Times Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 439,509 items from Wellington Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Misplaced. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Misplaced. A Salvation Army convert was giving his experience on the platform at a oertain barracks recently. He began his address as follows : - - ' 'Friends and cumerades, -i am an excavator, commonly called a navvy, and rough enough I look, but there's many a true heart beats beneath a pair of moleskin trousers.' The gathering was a 'solemn one, but the remainder of the address was postponed owing to the risibility of the audienoe. '

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
One Consolation. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

One Consolatior. I An Irishman had the misfortune to lose both his legs in a railway accident. While he was in the hospital. a fellow countryman came to see him, and the following conversation took place ; 'Pat,' said the visitor, ?it's very sorry I am for yer, to be sure.; but there's one consolation ye have to remember.' Pat : 4 And phwat's that, Mike?' ' Why,' said Mike, ' ye won't have to worrit where the next pair of boots is coming from I'

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Good-Bye. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Good-Bye. We aay lb for an hour, perhapa for years, We say it smiling, aay it choked, with tears ; We aay.it coldly, say it with a kiss. And yet we have no' other word than this — Good-bye. We have no dearer word for our heart's friend, For him who journeys to the world's far end, And soars our soul with going ; this we say, . ? . As unto him who steps but o'er the way — Good-bye. Alike to thctee we love and those wo hate, We say no more in parting. Ac life's gate, ? To' him who passes out beyond earth's sight, t . . We cry as to the wanderer for.a night Good-bye.

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
One Every Time. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

One Every Time. An old 'beer-chevyer' started home one night in his normal condition with a turkey which he had bought for his Sunday dinner. . ' The .road was rough, and he fell several times over all sorts of ob structions in the path, dropping the turkey each time, but picking it up again. Entering his house, he steadied himself as well as he could, and said to his wife : ' Here, wifey, I've brought you eleven turkeys.' . ' Eleven turkeys !' cried his wife ' I see but one.' 'Nonsense, you're blind,' cried her good man. ' Why, I. fell down eleven times coming home, and I swear I picked up a turkey every time I' Professor: 'Too bad! One of my pupils to whom I have given two courses of instruction in the, cultiva tion of the memory has forgotten to pay me, and the worst of it- 1 can't remember his name.' ? Beware of microbes in akissl' Cold-hearted Science cries. . Alas ! where ignorance is bliss, What folly to be wise I

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Last of the Pirates; OR, DOOM DRIVEN A Romance of the End of Ocean Outlawry. CHAPTER XXXV. A WOMAN'S DESPAIR. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

The Last of the Pirates; DOOM DRIVEN, A Romance of the End. of Ocean Outlawry.* ' ? ♦— — : — By Col. Prentiss Ingraham, Author of ' Merle the Mutineer,' &c., &c. CHAPTER XXXV. ? ? a woman's despair. Basil Barton was almost a changed man after his interview with Celeste. - Bad she stormed at him, upbraided him, and told, him that she hated him, then he would have met her with scorn and indifference. . But her forgivenness of him, not-, a word of censure falling from her lips, almost unmanned him. At first he tried to believe that she was treacherous, playing a part for revenge, as the poor Cuban girl had done. But this thought he was soon compelled to dismiss. He rose from his kneeling posture by her, and ordered breakfast served for thfem. Neither ate much, and at last he made an excuse to go on deck. He was glad to escape from her presence. His men saw that his manner was subdued, and those who had their suspicions that the ringleader of the plot to betray him and h...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Scotch to the Bone. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Scotch to the Bone. 'Haditnbt been the Sabbath day,' aaid a Perthshire preacher to an elder, | between the preachin's,' 'I would just have asked ye how the. hay was selling in Perth on Friday.' ? (Woii ? „„;j a'. _u„. it-.j -i ' °'i »'i »»'u ma uiuor, nta IE not been the day it is, I wad juBt hae tell'tye it was gaun at a. shilling the stane.' ' Indeed ? Well, had it been Monday instead, of the Sabbath, I would hae told ye I hae some to sell.' ' Umph, ay, ou ay, sir. And had it been Monday, as you say, then I wad just hae tell'tye: I wad gie the market price for it.'' 'And had ib not been the Sabbath day,' said the preacher, ' I wad just say take it.' The elder's carts were at the manse early on Monday morning, and. the preacher's haystack vanished like a highland mist.

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Knowing "Cop." [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

A Knowing 'Cop.' A policeman, a native of Tipperary, while passing a villa residence in Orown street, Sydney, the other day, noticed the lady of the house standing at the gate, with a poodle dog beside her. He accoated her with : ' It's a foine morning, mum.' ' It is,' the lady answered. - ' What a beautiful wee dog yes has.' ' The lady, proud of her dog, was very pleased to hear it praised. ' How old is the toiny orater, mum ?' 'Two years old.' 'Shure yee would nover pay for a loicenae for a wee thing loike that ?' 'I don't,' she answered. Two days after, the lady was much surprised to receive a summons for keeping an unregistered dog, and was more surprised at being fined ten shillings and costs on the next court day.

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Humorous Column. Took the Little Man's Part. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Hnmoroos Column. Took the Little. Man's , Part. A Bailor whose Bhip had been paid off at Sydney took the tram for Waterloo. Before he entered the tram he armed himself with a battle of rum, so that when he arrived at his destination he was very mixed. ' Waterloo 1* shouted the conductor. - Au rignc, never mma aDouc tne ' water,' let's have some more rum,' replied Jack. At last they 'emptied' Jack out of the carriage. Slouching along towards Botany, he saw two men busily engaged in Bawing a block of wood with a cross cut saw in a wood and coal yard. One man was very tall and the other very short. After looking at them for some time through half-closed eyes Jack entered the yard, and, without any warning, knocked the tall man down. ' ?What's that for?' shouted the injured man. 'Look yere,' said Jaok, 'I've seed you a-trying to take that saw away from the little -un for ever so long. Just you let him have it, will yer? If yer don't, I'll blind yerwith soience. Remember, I'm the bloke w...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Battle of Life. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

The Battle of Life. Thanks to that constant source of knowledge, the microscope, two dis coveriea of more than usual importance and interest have been made by scientists recently. In Paris. Dr. Bra has sue- j ceeded in isolating and rendering visible the microbe of that dreaded disease, cancer.;' While in India another physi cian, Dri Ronald Ross, was able to watch a battle to the death, between a burglarious microbe in the shape of the malaria microbe, and one of the police men of the human body, a white blood, corpusole. From those two interesting, but to the lay mind unimportant, achievements, great things are predicted by bacterio logists. The discovery of the specific microbe of cancer, it isdeclared, heralds the elaboration of an anti-toxin which will care that disease. Work has already been done along this line, and some ? measureof success' has been attained. The result of this certainty is that future methods of treatment for all germ diBeaaea, notably such as consumption a...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Ensilage [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Ensilage The making of ensilage ia a matter every farmer can turn his attention to profitably, green stuff of any kind loses quite two -thirds of its weight when made into hay ; that is, three tons of green wheat or wild oats will make a ton of hay. The daily ration of^en eiage per cow per day. will be about 601b. At this rate 3 tons of ensilage, the quantity of stuff required to make a ton of hay, .will feed a cow for 112 days. A cow so fed should produce lib of butter per day, say 1121bs for the 3 tons of eneilage consumed. This quantity of butter at 7d per lb would be worth 65s A very great quantity of wheat and oatB is cut every year for hay, which makes very poor feed for . working stock, but which if turned into silage would be very valuable fodder for cows, pigs, and even sheep.

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Laughing Plant of Arabia [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Laughing Plant of Arabia A curious plant grows in Ar:,b!a and in parts of the Western frontier of IJindostan. It is popularly known as the laughirg planf. The plant is of moderate s'zp, with bright yellow flowers and soft vekoty eead pods, each of which contains two or three seeds resembling small black beans. The nafives dry these seeds and reduce them to powder, A small dose causes the soberest man to dance, shout and laugh with the boisterous excitement of a madman, and to rush about cutting the most ridiculous casers for about an hour. At the expiration of this time ex haustion sets in and the excited person fall* asleep to wake after Beveral hoars with no recollection whatever of his onticF.

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

If you want a coucli uphol&terod take it to Shakespeare's.* Phlegmatic subjects aro more likely to ex perience home-sickneEs than their sanguine compeers. A tendoncy to despond without subserves l owards home-sickness, but ardent, enthusiastic people who continually look forward — who never are, but always to be, blessed — have the advantage, if advantage it be, of remaining immune. Education, or rather the want of it, is more potent than temperament in the trend of civilisation, which is equivalent to education, being die tinctly in the direction of cosmopolitanism. COLEMANE'S EUCALYPTE EXTRACT. Tho purest Eucalypto on earth. Lord Carrinutoh's friend in Influenza. Tho world's remedy for chest complaints, Tlio ' cold' cure of Earl Jorsoy's. But noto well Eucalypte, not Eucalypti. ? ' ?

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE STORYTELLER. A BITTER PENITENCE, CHAPTER XV.—(Continued.) [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

THE STORYTELLER. A BITTER PENITENCE. CIIAPTEIi XY. — (Continued.) She buried her faco in her hands as she eobbed, and Una, rising herself a little higher, gently laid her hand upon the bowed head. Thero was a strange look upon her face — a look of mingled envy and wonder. She had passed the stage when erief can find a blest'ed relief in tears. Her glit tering,, eyes were dry— her head seemed clasped by a band of fire. 'I wish I could cry, Norah ' she said. 'My dear, try! Try, Una!' 1 Nol* Pushing away, the tender arms that Would havo embraced her, she stood erect, preesing'one hand over her forehead, And holding the other with her usual gesture to her throat. 1 1 wept so many tears when ?ne wafj born,' 6he Baid, ' that I have none left now thatsheis dead.' Her voice changed. ' They; did not think that I should claim her dead — they ' thought they could keep me dumb still ! _ Wasi silent to -spare myself/ ?a they were to spare the name I disgraced? No, to spare her ! It was for her s...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
What is Thcosophy? [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

What is Thcosophy f (Specially contributed by H. G. C.) The nbovo question i» frequently BBked now-a-duys, and many volumes liavo been devoted to its nnswetiutf, yet Iu a largo number of peoplo 'Theoeophy' remains but tv name, as tho busy rush of fin do eiecle existence leaven little time to devote to 8Hy.tlji.ng not commonly considered of pressing importance. -? Tlio word ' Tbeosopby ' tlio ' Wisdom of God,' or 'Divine Wisdom,' is of Greek composition, and waa first used in Alexan dria iii1' fbo third century by tlio Neo Plntonisbj- Aniuionius Snccas, who was tlie master of a lodge of mystic nnd occult learning. The Bystem of philosophy, at onco scientific and religions, to which Ammonias gave the name Theosopliy, had existed in India for ages past, in fact from tho comiisncemont of the Aryan race, and is found permeating all the eoriptnres of that ancient land. From India, the cradle of our rnce, the esoterio philosophy became the basis of tho religions of tbe world. Persia, Chald...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cricket. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Cricket. The Bnrvoll Creek crioketers journeyed lo Suntop on Sunday last and played a match with the Suntop 'clnb, winning by an innings aad 50 runs. P Col reavy 16. and J. Horun 10, were the principal scorers for the winners, T. Quain and T. 'Kelly boing the successful bowlers. Tim following players have been selootod to re present Bodangora ' against tho Federals, to .be played at Wellington on Saturday, 21st inst. : — P. Kable, W. 3huttleworth, T. Howell,- W. -Reilly, W. Coonoy, N. Cooney, J. Cooney, W. Angwin, T. McDonnell, W. Smith, A. Davis, J. Titus (12). On Saturday, 28th, Bodangora play tl*e- return match with Wellington, which is looked forward to with much interest.' The following players will represent Federal C.C. against Bodangora on Saturday 21st inst, play to sturt ut 2 p.m. sharp ; — J. Coopor, G. Poole, S. Jennings, M. McOufEery, P. Noobit, L. Collins, J. Gander, R. Ivelk, A. Ziehikn, J. Portor. D. Richurds. Emergencies: — G. Djllior. E. Jennings,: W. Harng an. EUC...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

£10 Heward. r | ^Eft Pounds Howard will bo paid on conviction, or £5 reward for private information leading to tlio conviction of any person or persons found killing or taking our slicop out of any of our pad docks without our permission. March 10th, 1893 YEEOIX BROS. IMPORTANT NOT IE. To Farmers of the 'District, Ebt'g to aunouneo Unit i liuve rervivod tlio Agoncy of MESSRS. JAMES MARTI X & CO., Sydney, for thoir UI'-TO T iTE Faming Implements AND Harvesting iacliinery I am now receiving orders for the coining harvest. Do not le&vo your orders too laic, jjonk early and savo disappointment. No crop, no Macliino. New Hornsby open and slose back all-steel Bindor Mowors, Horso Rakes May Bros.' Champion Stripper ^ Martin's Qawlcr Strippers ? . Nicholson Strippers, Nicholson Harvesters Martin's Gawler Winnower ? : . Nicholson Winnowers Bagshaw Winnowers . ? - Also, Good Socond-Hand Sbrippors nnd Winnowers. Prices on application. Portablo Engines and travelling Chuff Cutte...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Spicer's Creea. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Spicer's Creea. Woatlicr fine, with oxtrcinely cold nights. A riilo match was hold hero on Saturday last. Following are tho scoros, including handicaps lOOydp. . 200yds, ' ? Total. H. J. Evans 25 ' ... ? 10 . 44 H. Hughes 23 ... '. 20 ... 43 . W. Zoll ... 21 ... 21 ... 42 R. Doherty 22 16 ... 38 Jno. Horw'ood' 22 ' ...' ' 1G 38 Jus. Horwood 22 ... .14 ... 36 A. Zoll ... 23 ... .12 ... 35 J. Coorie ... 14 ... - 3 ... .. .17

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Red Hair Lasts Longest. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

Red Hair L,asts Longest. We never remember seeing tho fringe of hair- that usually surrounds a bald head, of a ruddy colour. And we are now told that statistics Bhow that persons with red hair ar« far less likely to become bald than those who have another colour. Hair of a dark colour is generally much finer than red hair, and three dark hairB cover as much space as a single red hair. As a rule, a dark haired person has about 105,000 hairs on the skull. Fair haired person?, on the other hand — men as well as women — have from 140,000 to 10,000. Tho strongest hairs, however, are those of a red colour, and hence they endure the longest. It may be added that red-haired persons are gener ally of an unsympathetic and passionate nature, and are, as a rule, far more apt to be optimists than pessimists.

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Face Tells the Occupation. [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 19 October 1899

The Face Tells tlie Oc cupation. A man's occupation or condition has often more to do, with mating his face tbau moBt people think. Intellectual pursuits, .-like the studies of the scholarly profession, when coupled with temperate and good moral habits of life, brighten the faco and cive the person a refined and dignified look. Mag nanimity of nature or tbelovo of study aud art will make a bright, g'ad face, but con trary to this, a man may have a faco that does not please anybody, because of a love of self to the exclusion of others, notwith standing his learning and worldly shrewd ness. Soldiers get a hard, severe look ; over worked labourers constantly look tired ; re porters look inquisitive; mathematicians look- studious ; judges become grave, even when off the bench ; the mau who has had domestic trouble looks all broken up. An example of tho ludicrous side of this sub ject is to see a third-class lawyer stalking around a police court, looking as wise as an .owl. - The busines...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE STORYTELLER. A BITTER PENITENCE. CHAPTER XV.—(Continued). [Newspaper Article] — Wellington Times — 23 October 1899

THE STORYTE LLER. A BITTER PENITENCE. - CHAPTER -XV. — (Continued). .. 'My huabaud,' Una repeatod Bteadily. 1 My huBbond, who loved me and whom I . loved — my busbond, whom I deserted and j betrayed, and who, through me, lies in the! dishonoured grave filled by his own hand ! He is tlie. man wholies there, Norah !' ' , The girl bnd no word of reply — her nmnzement and perplexity wero too complete. She could only look at the stern pale beauty - :of the face before he^,atid stand awed and , dumb. Suddenly Una tottered forward and hid her face, wet with the first tears that Bhe had shed tbat day, upon tho other's neck. 1 Norah, Norah !' she cried. 'I must tell ? you now — here, beside my darling — before .,? I am hardened and frozen again — I must tell you all tho truth ; for, lost and base as I am, you' have not shrunk from me, and you loved 1 . her. Yes, my husband is there — sent there by me as Burely and aB truly as though my hand, and not hie own, had plunged the . knife into his ...

Publication Title: Wellington Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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