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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

188 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. turned around a corner. Having advanced a little ways he peeped through an open window and to his great joy, he be held a somebody surrounded by suggestive pictures and nude statues and worshipping a parrot; a few steps further, and behold, it was a pet monkey that was worshipped! While on the opposite side of the street somebody attired in all the finery of a queen gave her time and her heart to a boozy looking puss. "Good," he said, "all that is simply ideal. They are all doing what I delight in having them do." So musing, he came to a saloon. He slipped in on the quiet. In a couple of back rooms some men and women were having a high time. In some adjacent rooms were gambling parties, cursing and wrangling. "Oh," said the Devil, "here they talk our language. Fine, very fine. Con tinue, my beloved children, your father heareth." At the bar stood another crowd, half-stunned and half-crazed, enter taining each other with choice morsels of slang and vulgarity....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

-WTWip THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 189 here is the place to find what I am looking for. I will take it in;" and proceeding from one business place to another, he found to his great satisfaction agreat deal of deception, down right fraud, all kinds of imposture, delusion, artifices, tricks, swindles, deceits, stratagems and impositions. It simply looked to him as a clever game of the survival of the fittest or the smartest. Yet, notwithstanding the general conspiracy of employers and employees to swindle or to over-reach, he came across some tradesmen who were inclined, as far as competition permitted, to be honest towards their customers. Hence he could not stay there and feel at ease. At some corner he espied at his right in a cross street a big, imposing structure, looking very much like a courthouse and such it was. "Well," he said, '! have not been very fortunate thus far. In all probability in there I shall find what I want and be able to stay." Climbing the steps he entered and looke...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

mjmg1 igo THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. on the third day the injunction case came up, the defendants told such a straightforward story, that he became more than disgusted. He did not wait for the end, but left with the determination to return to the place from whence he had come. With this thought in mind, he walked out of town with a slight hope, however, of finding in the country what he was looking for. Hardly had he gone a quarter of a mile before he was attracted by the sound of jolly music. Mighty desirous of finding out what was going on, he quickened his pace. Soon he found himself in front of a dance hall. After a hurried glance at the participants he could not help say ing: "Truly, now have I found the ideal rendezvous of sin." He saw young and old jumping as if they had made a wager to break boards and beams. He was overjoyed to see how, especially the young folks, embraced and pressed each other and were afire with lust and luxury. They were actually be ing consumed with the fire...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

iHWPIUfl'fP'i ' -" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 191 A) 3 St. Anthony's Power. 2C $C 3 -E E din thp fnllnwinrr infprpQtinor ctnrv frntn tVip "Rnc:- w ton Orphans' Bouquet: Dear St. Anthony, good and kind, Let us all our lost things find, And when overwhelmed with sorrow, Find 01 find a bright tomorrow. "Any person finding a silver crucifix inlaid with mother-of-pearl and with the name of John Del oreaux inscribed on the back, and returning it to Father Deloreaux, pastor of the Church of Our Lady, will be given $25.00 reward." This was the sign which was tacked on every 'grocery, fence and barn, in the little town of San Pedro in the State of Texas. The crucifix belonged to Father Deloreaux, an old French priest, who had been pastor of the church for many years. The crucifix was an heirloom and had been owned by his greatgrandfather. It had been blessed by the Pope and had numerous indulgences attached to it. Father Deloreaux prized it very highly. It was lost in this way: One afternoon the p...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

!3"mwwvavtvp 192 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. there. He said to himself: "Oh, I suppose it is in my pocket somewhere in the cor ner, perhaps I did not look very well." He arrived at the house which was not a half square from the river, heard the sick man's confession and gave him Holy Communion. As he was going through the hall which led to the street door, he looked for the third time in his pocket, but the cross was gone. Turning to the sick man's wife he said: "Mrs. O'Neal, I have lost a small crucifix which is valu able, almost priceless, to me. You would do me a great favor to thoroughly search the rooms I have been in, and then let me know whether you have found it or not. I will indeed be under many obligations to you if you do this." Mrs. O'Neal promised to have the rooms searched as soon as she could. Father Deloreaux burned a box of matches in looking from the house to the bridge for his cross, but to no avail. He went home with a heavy heart, yet he had still two hopes. The first...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 193 learned and practiced this teaching. But her father was a sinful man and her little brother was fast following in his footsteps. Marie, with death staring her in the face, knew that her life might be saved if she received the proper atten tion. But that was impossible so far as her father was con cerned. His conduct weighed heavily on her mind, yet she bore her mental and bodily agony in patience. Everybody considered her a saint. At times she would seem to get better, and could go out, but she always had a relapse. One morning she was out and met Father Deloreaux. ''Good morning, my child," said he "you seem better." "I am, Father," said she, raising her large, wistful eyes to his face, "but not for long. I'll soon get worse again." "O! I hope not!" said he. By the way, Marie, have you heard that I lost my silver crucifix? I was just coming down to your house to ask you something." "I should be glad to do anything for you that is in my power; but that is no...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

194 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. After Mass Marie starred to make her thanksgiving. The lovely littlegirl was so tired and exhausted that she fell asleep in the pew. Father Deloreaux noticed how weak she looked, so he said to his housekeeper: "Mrs. McCruder, set another plate. There is a little lady going to breakfast with us this morning." The plate was set and the priest was going to get his little friend. As he was going into the sacristy, she ran right against him. She did not look wretched as before. Her eyes sparkled and her cheeks were flushed with excitement as she held in her small, thin hand the crucifix. "CM Father! " she sat down and it was some time be fore she could speak. At length she recovered breath and said: "O! Father, here is your lost crucifix. I have often seen it and I know this is it." "Tell me, child, where and how did you find it?" "I did not find it," she said. "I was making my thanks giving and I fell asleep. Then I thought I was in a beauti ful shady bower, and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 195 You may be sure that every year there is a novena to St. An thony, and a beautiful shrine has been erected in his honor; you may be sure, too, that this miracle, if we may so call it, made Marie's father reform, and her brother, too, and she got entirely well under the care of a kind nurse. Wp Wp fc$ THE INDIANS, Gone are the solitudes; his race no more Shall triumph o'er that wild and vast domain Of forest, river, lake and boundless plain, , The heritage of centuries before. r His tribes have vanished from each distant shore, Where the blue lakes they loved in beauty chain; f A few sad children of his race remain Like shadows ling'ring when the day is o'er. An outcast of his own, his father's home; A beggar in his kingdom forced to roam. Ay, as the forest's wild flow'rs fade away, When trees are felled, and flames the light of day, So dies a race when civ'lization's light Burns with its glory, but with blinding blight. Louise F. Murfihy'va. Catholic World. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

196 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The Nation's Wards, Within the past ten years the population of the Indian Territory has nearly doubled. About 75 per cent of this in crease is white emigration. The total population is esti mated at 350,000, of which 75,000 are Indians. The remark able growth of population is due to two causes the fertility of the soil and the easy manner in which land was obtained. In order that the outside paleface may understand the very much complicated affairs in this territory, it may be stated that the Indian Territory is composed of Five Nations, with the following population: Creek, 15,000; Cherokee, 25,000; Choctaw, 15,000; Chickasaw, 15,000; Seminole, 1,000. These little nations each embrace a territory averaging about 150 by 100 miles in extent, merely counties in size. In the thirties these tribes were "exiled" from Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Florida, and since that time until now each nation has had its own tribal govern ment, each independen...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 197 much land as they wanted, virtually without price. The shrewd white man took advantage of this simply patriarchal system by fencing large tracts of land and sub letting to other white absconders who had left the States just in advance of the sheriff. Seeing how easily money was to be made, many Indians followed this system, and thus the white "intruder" was welcomed and finally invited to their territory. This subleasing continued until now the white men are in the majority and occupy the larger quantity of the most valuable farming and grazing land. So long as the In dian could live on his rent revenues he would not work, and as the white man could not occupy lands except by leasing, unless he married an Indian woman, the Indian had a com paratively easy time. But with this large emigration lands have become scarce, and a number of Indians are landless. When the lands are allotted, the Indian will not be per mitted to sell his land. His homestead is also ex...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

ig8 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Jt tjt f Local Paragraphs, ijr ifc ijt L. The Mission is putting in a system of waterworks. On the morning of May i the effects of a severe frost were apparent on vegetation. Much damage resulted. On April 23 the venerable Brothers Casimir and Anselm made their perpetual vows, the Rt. Rev. Abbot officiating. May 6 Rev. Fr. D. Hilary Cassal, O. S. B., left the Mission for Mer rill, Wis., where he will make a three months' stay, Monday, May 4, the Rev. Mother Catherine Troy was re-elected Superior General of the Sisters of Mercy in the Vicariate of Indian Terri tory. On the middle of May much needed rains, minus wind and electrical disturbance, fell at intervals of ten days. The crop outlook is highly prom ising at this time. May 3 the Catholics of Shawnee welcomed their Bishop on the occa sion of his Confirmation tour. His Lordship will be here (Sacred Heart) June 14. Persons not yet confirmed take notice. Mr. Hal Townsend, a prominent merchant of South McAli...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

The Indian Advocate Vol. XV. JULY, 1903. No. 7 Kindness, It was only a sunny smile, And little it cost in the giving; But it scattered the night Like morning light, And made the day worth living. Through life's dull warp a woof it wove In shining colors of hope and love And the angels smiled as they watched above, Yet little it cost in the giving. -- It was only a kindly word, A word that was lightly spoken; Yet not in vain, For it stilled the pain Of a heart that was nearly broken. It strengthened a faith beset by fears, And groping blindly through mists of tears, For light to brighten the coming years, Although it was kindly spoken. It was only a helping hand, And it seemed of little availing; But its clasp was warm, And it saved from harm A brother whose strength was failing. Its touch was tender as angel's wings, But it rolled the stone from the hidden springs And pointed the way to higher things, Though it seemed of little availing.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

200 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. (From St. Anthony's Messenger,) false and True His lory of Spanish America. HMI HE history of no other nation has been, perhaps, Tmore distorted and misrepresented by non-Catholic nnrl nflior rtno.cirlorl liictnnanc f lion lVn liiefnrr nf Spain. These very historical misrepresentations, which would make us believe that the Spaniards were an exceedingly cruel, brutal, tyrannical, and treach erous people, were the foundation upon which were based the atrocity-howlings against Spain before the last war, which has proved so disastrous to both countries. Certainly such Catholics who draw all their wisdom from the daily papers howled in the same key with the bigots and lent their aid in unchaining the war dogs, to rob "cruel, perfidious Spain" of her last colonies.' As rec ompense for all this they now see their co-religionists in "our island possessions" insulted and deprived of their most sacred rights in the most shameful manner. It would seem that Catholics, i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 201 in which even non-Catholics mistrust, and no longer find sati faction in the threadbare fairy tales and worm-eaten historical chestnuts of yore, but are now beginning, like real and true historians, to study the old original documents. This is true also with regard to Spanish-American history. To describe Spanish domination in the New W orld as a mere system of brutal plunder and mercenary rapine, is a kind of so-called historical appreciation the time for which is happily past. The popular and religious passions kindled in the sixteenth century, flaming with greatest vehemence in the seventeenth, and adroitly nursed by England, are out of season now, and we no longer admit that people could have achieved great things without at leat some great and noble motives; still less, that it could have maintained its hold at such great disadvantages as the Spaniards labored under, without manifest ability, wisdom, and some humanity in its directing power. For this un...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

202 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. we meet with during the reform movement toward the end of the Middle Ages, as being really and truly descriptive of their times? Not only that; even the writings of many Saints, who aimed at the abrogation of certain abuses, aud who in conse quence painted only the shady side of their time in vivid colors, would find but little consideration in the eyes of a true historian. This applies equally to the writings of Rt. Rev. Bartho lomew de Las Casas, O. P., with regard to the history of Spanish America. It is but justice to say that he has deserv ed exceedingly well with the Indians, and that his work in their behalf is worthy of the highest praise, but to give him all the credit in this direction, to represent things in such a manner as if the Spaniards would have exterminated the Indians but for him, as is done in a recently published "Life of Bartolome de Las Casas," by Rev. L. A. Dutto, is nothing short of ridiculous. On this point the historian John Gilma...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

v"iY",l3?A"f"",i THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 203 most bloody occurrences in Spanish-American history, which have been charged to the Spaniards as acts of wanton cruelty, will yet be explained and justified as legitimate measures of war. What I have said of the occurrences at Cholula in re gard to Cortes (that he acted in self-defense, and that the numbers of the slain had been greatly exaggerated), will ev entually prove to have been the position in which Pizarro found himself at Caxamarca. (This has since been found to have really been the case.) That excesses were committed is beyond a doubt, but these excesses were the exceptions and not the rule, and furthermore, they were punished. See, for instance, the ultimate career of Nuno de Guzman, and the punishment awarded to Hernando de Bezan, and to many others. Spanish justice was slow but sure, and no official, however exalted in position, escaped the dreaded "Residen cia" (official and public investigation of term of office), or the stil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

204 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Thou hast redeemed us, 0 Lord, in Thy Blood. Such is the grateful acknowledgment of the whole Catho lic Church celebrating the Feast of the most Precious Blood on the first Sunday of July, This Feast has been instituted by Pius IX, in 1850 in grateful remembrance of his return to Rome after his exile to Gaeta during the Roman revolu tion. On that occasion the magnanimous Pontiff issued a special decree, thereby stamping upon that Feast the same character of thanksgiving which belongs to the feast of Mary, Help of Christians. Sin also would have condemned the human race to an eternal exile from Heaven, the true father land of souls, had not the Blood of Jesus redeemed all man kind. Under this aspect, devotion to the most Precious Blood, as the Church understands it, has a peculiar fitness which ap peals to Catholics of the present age no less than in the troub led days of the saintly Pontiff. Moreover, it has a special meaning which determines its practial ef...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

Hljk"MCTiiiii i inn THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 205 by revealing to us the true purpose of the Redemption. There are in our age two great classes of men who differ in their apprehension of the design of God in the redemption of mankind. The first are those who say we need no redemp tion at all, believers in human nature alone, who look to this world and to its scientific attainments as sufficient for all the peifection of mankind and society: men who, with the most accurate ideas on business, on commercial transactions, on law, etc. who declare that man has within himself sufficient natural powers to attain the full perfection of his being, and consequently deny the necessity of faith, of the Sacraments, etc. as though modern science, the discovery of the X-rays, the inventions of Edison and Marconi were enough for the happiness of man. There are on the other hand, those who say that when the Son of God shed his divine Blood on the Cross, He effected the redemption of mankind so completely...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

TssTfys1 206 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Christ indeed has redeemed us by His most Precious Blood but it is just and even necessary that we cooperate with Him by atonement for our sins in the work of our salvation. Noth ing but reasonable in this doctrine and the Saints have well understood it. They have done penance not only for their own sins, but for the sins of the world, trusting indeed in the Blood of Jesus shed for mankind in the garden of Gethsemane in the streets of Jerusalem, during His scourging, when He was crowned with thorns, nailed Lo the cross and pierced with a lance; but feeling at the same time that as He entered into His glory through his bloody Passion, so His followers cannot enter Heaven without taking the same road. It was this thought that made millions of martyrs cheerfully give up their life and shed their blood for Him. Let us then join our voice to that of the Catholic Church to-day, saying with Her: "Thou hast redeemed us, O Lord in Thy Precious Blood." . This...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1903

UUHH Jll, mi I mi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 207 away all the sins of her life! When the sinner inclines his head under the absolving hands of the priest, the same effect is produced by the Blood of Jesus applied to him. Also in Holy Communion the divine Blood is given us in truth and reality. "The more often and fervently you will receive holy Communion," says the saintly Cure of Ars, "and the more your glorious body will shine in Heaven, for in each Com munion the Blood of Jesus runs through your veins and is in fused into your body in such a manner that you may truly say with St. Paul: 'Not I, but Christ, liveth in me'. "Let us then often drink of that Precious Blood and thirst for it. As the fledglings of the pelican Thirst for the red'drops from the parent breast; O Pie Pelican, God and Man, Give us Thy Flesh, Thy Blood, and we are blest! Some one may ask: Are there any relics of the Precious Blood? Beyrout, Bruges, Saintes, and some monasteries have claimed to possess relics of it. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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