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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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VOLUNTEERS’ FAREWELL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

VOLUNTEERS’ FAREWELL. W.G.S. I. Now flows the banner to the breeze, Now sounds the trump that bids us go; The barque is ready on the seas, And we must speed to meet the foe; And never hearts more proudly yet, Went forth at Freedom’s trumpet cry: But ties we cannot well forget, Bring tears to many a manly eye. 11. We do not weep with human fears, With sense of danger, dark and dread; I he foe shall never see the tears, That fall upon a sister’s head; Behind the cottage door when love, Stands*waiting for the parting kiss, — ’ Tis there the deepest [tang we provej Where first we found the sweetest bliss. 111. Ah! thither, —when in the fields of strife, Our hearts in funcy still shall fly; There still, when struggling wild for life, Shall ding each fondest memory; Perchance, even then, some earnest prayer Shall crown with peace our parting breath And still the sigh of heart most dear, Shall bless the spirit freed by death. Charleston Patriot.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE METHODISTS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

THE METHODISTS. I here is no sect of Protestantism, which appears so peculiarly anxious to acquire a character for intolerance and illiberality, as that of the Wesleyans.— The Preachers of that noisy heresy make as much pretensions to republicanism, as if any professors ot their doctrines had taken part in the Revolution or won from British tyranny the freedom of the States. YVe are under no compliments to .Methodism or Methodists for possessing the rights of conscience; if liberty depended upon their favor it would soon be banished from the land, unless indeed their periodicals do not express the opinion of their people. They never did anything for the rights of conscience; they were the bitterest opponents of the Americans during the revolutionary contest, they were out and out Tories, and so violently does this spirit prevail in their Preachers, though not, we hope, in the great body of their people, that they mourn, lament, and aiflict themselves whenever they hear ot the smalle...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
OGDENSBURGH, N. Y. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

OGDENSBURGH, N. Y. Bail-Road to Boston — Rail-Iload Ball — The Ladies — Society, fyc., <s-c. To the Editor of the Poston Pilot : Dear Sir, —Ogdensburgh, though now a place of considerable importance and ot wealth, as well from its facilities, for manufacturing, milling, and other purposes, is ere long to become a rival of some of the larger cities in the Western part of this State. It is believed now, that the line of Kail-Road from this place to Lake Champlain will, without doubt, be constructed, thus connecting with the road from Champlain to Boston, —the engineers having completed their part, and report so favorable that all doubts seemed to be removed; we are assured that contracts will be given at an early day, and that operations will be commenaed upon the road, in the early part of the coming season. When this road is completed from Boston to Ogdensburgh, it will afford a steam communication from Boston to Chicago, Illinois, causing one transhipment at this place; ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 3 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

Business {Department. THE BOSTON PILOT IS PRINTED AND PUBLISHED lIY THE PROPRIETOR, PATRICK DOXAHOE, Oil every Saturday morning, at No 1 Spring Lane, near Washington Street, lies ton, Mass. TERMS... .§2.so—if paid within three months from the time of subscribing—otherwise S3 will be charged. $1,50 for six mouths. Four months $l. TT* No paper discotninued until ail arrears are paid upl O' Letters not post-paid (except from Agents) are no released from the Post-office. We publish the following for the benefit ofpostmnsters many of whom do not sen* proper receipts: Post Olliee, , , . To the Post Master at iloston; — Sir—l have this day received 8 for subsciption to the “ Boston Pilot,” with which I have charged myself in my accounts with the Government, and given the publish er an order on you for the amount, which you will please pay on presentation. , P.M. The following is a convenient form for the receipt re quisite to be sent, simultaneously, to us: Received 8 for subscriptions to ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
RELIEF FOR IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

RELIEF FOR IRELAND. The following poetic gem was read at the recent meeting held in New York to raise . ,l funds for the relief of the distressed in Ireland:— ERIN'S CALL. “Have pity on mr, have pity ou me, Oil! ve, mytriends; lor the liaud el' God hath touched inc.” Isle of the doom'd!—thy voice from the ocean, AwahcHs thy nous in ihe land ol the free; In sorrow they rise with filial emotion, Ami respond to thy call with heart sympathy. The lulls of your fathers are cankered and biighted, file grass at their doors is waving and long, The strong man is bowed, his sold is affrighted, And hushed iu their halls are ihe burp and the song. Famine has entered each lmmlet ami dwelling, With Despondence and Want, her torturing band; While l cstilenre, feeding iu blackness, is swelling— The angel of Dentil is reaping the land. Arouse, sons of Erin, your country loud calls you—“Bread!—give us bread!” is her famishing cry; Hope is not iu their hearts to conquer and rescue, IS or hope ol escape...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A Little of Every Thing. “He that runs may read." [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

A Little of Every Thing. “ He that runs may read." A Complication of Disorders. “Of what disorder did your father die?” asked one friend of another, after having changed the common salutations of meeting. “Of a complication of disorders,” he replied. “Why,” said he, “how do you describe! this complication.” “He died,” answered the other, “of two physicians—an apothecary and a surgeon.” Wanted to see ’his Father. We have heard that, previous to a recent wellcontested battle, a young volunteer officer asked leave of a certain celebrated MajorGeneral to go and see his father, who was on his death-bed. “Go,” said the commander, smiling scarcastically, “you honor father and mother, that your days may be long in the land.” An Assistant Editor. An editor out West advertised for an assistant, capable of writing on grave subjects. A person made application for the office, to whom he put the question. “Have you any editorial experience?” “No,” was the reply, “but I have for four years kept th...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

jp. REMITT ANCES TO IRELAND X* S'and PASSAGES, by “TAPSCOTTS’ LINE” ob> aiaj/ * -VOO.VUIjCi U) Z -I. to BOSTON on NEW YOUK. DRAFTS for one pound and upwards, payable in any part ol'lkbland, Enoi.and or Scotland, and PASSAGES by the above Splendid Line may be obtained by persons here lor their friends at home, on apply ins to ELLIOTT A UKEIG, No. lO Merchants Exchange, Boston, Agents for W. A J. T. TAPSCOTT. Feb list! T HO NIAS I>. GLEASON, 85 BROAD St. Wholesale Dealer in Strong Hetr, Porter, Ale and tic der A large supply kept constantly on hand for cityanu country sale, which will be sold on the most reasonaby terms. Jnt, ED W A Kl) DOLAN, IYIKIX HAN T TAILOR, (iMte oj Boston), Id? Westminster street, Providence, R.I, respectfully solicits the patronage ol his friends and the public, lie hopes to render good satisfaction to those who please luvor him with a call He will keep a good assortment of Cloths, Cassimeres, Doeskins, Vestings, Ac. Also, Beady Made Gar...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

Notices of thiskind inserted four times for $1 INFORMATION WANTED. Of JOHN GAUGUIN, ofTarmin’s Ilill,parish cfKilmore, Erris, co. Mayo. When last beard ul he was in Curbondale, Pa. llis wile, Honor Gaugliiu, will be tlianklul to any person who will give her any information ol him, by directing a letter to her in care of Thomas Uon all or. Cliutonville P.O. Worcester County, Ms. j 23 Cl MARGARET VVINN, a native of co. Roscommon, Kili'onau, who sailed from leligo in May last for Quebec. W lien last beam Irom she was iu Albany, N.Y. Any information respecting her will be thanklully received by I 'ati;,ehMc(,uritv,;i\u..lon Iron Works, Ms. *3 Ul JOHN McGEaKV, of co. Tyrone, who emigrated in the year lb-11, in company with his cousin, Neal MeCuirk. When last heard Irani he was out West. Anr information of him will be thankfully received by his sorter, Rosanna McGeary, corner of iluuck and Jctfersau street, Albany, N.Y . Ol MICHAEL and SUSAN DOY’LE, of Middletown, co. Monahan, who emigrat...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Merican War THE KILLED AND WOUNDED. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

The Merican War THE KILLED AND WOUNDED. The Washington correspondent of the Buffalo Express, furnishes the following interesting intelligence. AV r e recognise in the signature our old friend, W. £. Robinson, Esq. ‘•I have been looking into a curious paper from the Adjutant General’s Office of the United States Army, transmitted to Congress by Mr. Secretary Marcy, and ordered to be printed. It has not yet been put in type, but 1 have taken considerable trouble to procure a list of names, showing the number of those who were killed or wounded at the Rattles of Palo Alto and Resaca do la Palma, on the Bth and 9th of May last. I heir places of nativity are given, and it is interesting to see the number of brave Irishmen and Germans, whose names there stand registered in the scroll of history-—living, they fought for their country—dying, they have left on record an eloquent argument against the charges of Nutivism. Much as this proves in t.ivor of the patriotism of Naturalized citizens,...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LATER FROM THE ARMY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

LATER FROM THE ARMY. The steamship Alabama has arrived at New Orleans. She left Brazos on the 3d inst. No especial news of interest from Saltillo, from which it is inferred that the danger of attack was not as imminent as at first supposed when Gen. Worth’s exKess was despatched for reinforcements, ates from Matamoras, to the Ist instant, have come to hand. Since last advices there hate been rumors of and countermarches—that Genera Wool’s column was cut off, General Worth’s division driven back to Monterey from Saltillo, and that Taylor was shut up at Monterey. General Scott and Staff left two days previous in haste for Camargo. Going up the river they met a steamer with the mail bringing intelligence that part of the corps of observation belonging to Santa Anna’s army had been seen near Parras, where General Wool’s army was encamped, and that Gen. Wool had joined Gen. Worth at Saltillo, as had Generals Twiggs and Quitman as per previous accounts. General Patterson’s division had cr...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
OLIVER CROMWELL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

OLIVER CROMWELL. A recent number of the Dublin Review, has the following remarks in relation to Thomas Carlyle’s “Letters and Speeches of Cromwell”:— “ JNlr. Carlyle admits that his is ‘one other dull book added to the thousand, dull every one of them, which have been issued on this subject, and that the very sound of Puritanism has become tedious as a tale of past stupidities.’ He may have merely uttered this in the excess of his modesty, but we can assure him that it is a sober truth, at least as far as his own book is concerned. That he has been able to strip the most eventful period of our history of all interest, is a wonderful and original triumph of the genius of Carlylism. His two great volumes are in fact an interminable sermon, written in the most approved cant of methodism, and addressed—nay, stare not gentle reader, for we use Mr. Carlyle’s own words—addressed, we say, to serious readers. Take the following as a very favorable speci- \ men of the style, manner, and matte...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FROM RIO DE JANEIRO. ARREST AND RELEASE OF AMERICAN SAILORS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

FROM RIO DE JANEIRO. ARREST AND RELEASE OF AMERICAN SAILORS. Some difficulty hud taken place between the Brazilian government, and Mr. Wise, our Minister, and Com. Rosseau, of the American squadron. Different versions are given of the affair, but whatever may be the cause, the differences were of so serious a nature that the United States vessels did not unite in the salutes fired by the foreign ships of war on occasion of the birth of a princess in the royal family, and it is said that the Brazilian government has requested the recall of Mr. Wise, and also of Commodore Rosseau. The True. Sun has the following notice of the trouble: A few Jays previous to the arrival of the expedition at Rio, t»vo American sea- | men, of the United States sloop Saratoga,! got into some difficulty of a national char- j acter with the citizens, during the ceremo-i nies of the christening of the infant Brazilian princess, and were imprisoned. I Lieutenant Davis, of the Saratogo, interposed with the aut...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Correspondence. CABOTVILLE, MS., [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

Correspondence. CABOTVILLE, MS., Jan. 4lh, 1847. To the Editor of the Boston Pilot •• My Dear Sir,— ln the Pt7of of the 26th ult., I observed an article, headed “An appeal from Ireland,” by the Rev. Jas. McDavitt, P.P. of Culdaff, co. Donegal, Ireland, which I read attentively with mingled sentiments of joy and sorrow. It is most pleasing to me to hear of the Rev. Mr. McDnvitt’s good health and unremitting exertions, and especially to see a few lines from his paternal hand. But on the contrary, it is heart-rending to behold him with his numerous, attentive and devoted congregation, having no other place to offer the august and adorable sacrifice of the Mass, than within the cold, open and unfinished walls of their new edifice, and having nought but the expanded canopy of the heavens, with its conflicting elements for their roof. I am not a native of that parish, but I have seen seven Christmas days in that chapel, where I had the pleasure of assisting at six Masses each time, the re...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PROGRESS OF THE CHURCH, &C. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

PROGRESS OF THE CHURCH, &C. Conttableville, Lewis Cos., N.Y. > Jan. i'ith, IM7. ) Mr. Editor, —As your paper brings us weekly intelligence of the great progress of our .Holy Religion, and of the many Churches, which are being erected throughout our country; it may be interesting to the readers of the Pilot and to the friends of our holy Faith, to hear from this backward and new mission. Being living here for several years “as a flock without a shepherd,” we were visited by the Rt. Rev. Dr. McClusky about two years ago. On beholding our spiritual destitution, he sent ns, about fifteen ! months ago, Rev. Win. Howard, a most zealous and exemplary priest. Not havi ing a church, our good pastor at once entered on the good work. He went with his poor, but faithful people into the woods several miles, and in a few days had trees felled sufficient to supply lumber for the church. Every day was our good pastor at his post cheering us on, and none of us worked harder th...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MASSACHUSETTS AND THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

MASSACHUSETTS AND THE WAR. THE PHOT. SATURDAY, JANUARY 23. 1847. The justice or this injustice of the present war with Mexico, its necessity or its justification upon principles of morals or international law, we take it, at this time, cannot bean open matter for this commonwealth to discuss in view of its relations to the Federal compact, and to the existing state of things between the two countries. There is nothing perhaps that will or can more strongly tend to weaken faith in the wisdom of our peculiar and boasted strupture of government, than the nullification of an individual State in time of peace, or its repudiation of the General Government in time of war. There must be faith and fealty, the land through, when common wrong and common peril is at ohr door, or the State is rotten and the institutions which guard and govern it are but a dreamy and impractical experiment, exploding in the hour when its strength and recuperative power is demanded. We deplore the war; we cannot b...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MOB CHIVALRY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

MOB CHIVALRY. It is a humiliating fact, that not one of the companies in this State, have volunteered to fight the battles of the country on the plains of Mexico. No, not even the chivalrous companies who ran off the Common, some years since, at the sight of the Montgomery Guards, and by that act, and their conduct afterwards, incited the mob, who hooted and pelted that brave company in the streets of Boston. The natives, even, who boast of all the patri-! otism in this country, have made no move- I inent in this matter; thus proving them-' selves, what we have often asserted, that they are brave fellows in time of peace; but let an emergency arrive, and they are deaf to the calls of the country. The Salem Advertiser has some welltimed remarks on this subject:— “YVe would suggest to the military light companies, that appear on gala days in uniform coats and pants, with colors, drums and trumpets, for the purpose of playing training, and so giving amusement to little boys and superan...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SCENE IN AN INTELLIGENCE OFFICE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

SCENE IN AN INTELLIGENCE OFFICE. Dramatis Personae The intelligent man; and a large assortment of “foreign help,” chiefly Catholics, looking for employment. Enter City Treasurer. C. T. Who keeps here? Oh! you—well, my wife wants a cook; did you know it? I guess I must get her one. Can you supply me with such an article? I. M. Yes, squire; I reckon 1 can. Wb have got a great variety of them here; and— C. T. Oh! damn your variety! I want only one sort; and nothing else. Where are they? are they here? (Hubbub among the helps: several offer themselves.) C. T. What are you? Une of the helps. Long life to your honor! I’m a cook, and a swinging one, too; a regular baster. I’ll keep your honor’s lady in hot water, if she wants it. C. T. Are you a Catholic? Help. Yes, glory be to God! I am. C. T. You may go to purgatory. You shan’t roast on my fire. Are you a papist? are you ? are you ? A simultaneous shout of pious gratitude rises from all the helps; the C. T. stops his ears, and runs out. ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
From the Waterford (Ireland) Chronicle. THE BOSTON PILOT. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 23 January 1847

From the Waterford ( Ireland) Chronicle. THE BOSTON PILOT. We cordially reciprocate the kind sentiments which dictate the following from onr American cotemporary. The honest Irishmen who has suffered the painful, yet “charmed life,” of an exile for twentytwo years, is not to be reflected on, or wounded in his feelings by us. He has a perfect right to differ with us on a subject about which he must know more than we Can pretend to know, —and we only fear, whilst we allow him the advantage of experience, that he may not be free from prejudice, the trammels of custom, and a bad publie opinion. But we shall not quarrel with our worthy countryman on his peculiar tastes and predilections with regard to races—whilst we wish that all Irishmen jn America could think well of the abolition of slavery. The paper from which we quote is more Irish than the Irish journals themselves, is ably edited, and must indeed be a powerful means of sustaining the cause of Irishmen and their religion in Ameri...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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