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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1988

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL DECEMBER, 1988 Backroads Continued from Page 21. all of which have bright red tin roofs. It is a beautiful mountain farmstead. 18.7 (1.3) We are now in the community of Alum Ridge, Virginia. The old store on our left here was Dulaney's Store and was operated for over 44 years by Dennis D. Dulaney, Sr. and his wife Hazel. After Mr. Dulaney passed away, Mrs. Dulaney continued to run the store until she was forced to close it for health reasons several years ago. The store was both home and business to the Dulaney family who lived in the attached five room house. The store was the hub of community activity in years gone by and served as post office, hardware, feed and seed supplier and a gathering place for local folks to socialize. Today the store is missed by area residents who must now drive about 20 miles one way to find hardware supplies and general merchandise. One local resident recalls evenings long ago when friends gathered around the pot bel- lied stov...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1988

Backroads Continued from Page 22. and neighbors before the play began. In essence one would suppose that the old Alum Ridge School was not that much different from hundreds of other small schools dotted throughout these mountains during that time period, but that's what made each and everyone of them so special. 19.8 (0.5) Here we will turn right onto State Road 739. 20.9 (1.1) At this point the pavement ends. 21.6 (0.7) At this stop sign we will turn right onto State Road 730. 21.7 (0.1) There is another Christmas tree farm on our left. 23.4 (1.7) State Road 740 turns right, but we will continue straight ahead on State Road 730. 23.7 (0.3) Here we will turn left onto State Road 740. It is a gravel road. 25.1 (1.4) At this stop sign we will turn right onto State Road 743. 26.5 (1.4) The gravel road turns into a paved road at this point. 26.6 (0.1) Here we will turn left onto State Road 750. 29.7 (3.1) At this stop sign we will turn right onto U.S. 221 towards Hillsville, Virginia. 3...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1988

"The Heart of the Blue Ridge" JLaurel vlonthly Journal Of Mountain Life December 1988 Volume 5 Number 5 $1.25 | PAGE 24 are hidden away on mountain backroads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our B ACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite places with you each month. HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. This month we are reprinting one of our all time favorite BACKROAD tours. It originally appeared in the October 1986 edition. We will wind our way into the soul of an all but forgotten mountain community where nature's beauty is at home in e...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

THE FIRST WORLD WAR AND OTHER FIRESIDE TALES EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. We were living at Papa's Place when World War I broke out, the French and Germans fighting each other, and each country lining up its Allies, as we did to play Town Ball. There was fear in every home in the United States, the people were dreading the time when our own American young men might have to "go across the water" and help England and France, our Allies, fight the Germans and the Axis powers. President Woodrow Wilson was constantly spoken of at meal time, or around the hearth, or in the fields. Mule and cow traders talked about whether the president would keep the United States out of the war. A British steamship, The Lusitania, was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Ireland on May 7, 1915. There were but a few survivors of the 1250 passengers aboard, which included 17...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

P/VGE 2 MOUNTAIN THE FIRST WORLD WAR (Continued from page 1.) they had gone to bed - located near the front window - two women passed through the room, and went on out through the bolted door, without even touching the thumb-bolt, or the door knob. It was winter time, and my grandparents had left a big fire blazing in the wide fireplace when they went to bed. The lighted oil lamp on the mantel had been blown out, but the crackling, blazing logs furnished enough light to see clearly every object in the room. Both my grandparents saw the two women, and they told it with equal amazement. The two middle-aged women were dressed in identical coarse red-and-black cotton checked dresses, the skirts long and full, typical of the "knockabout" dresses farm women wore in the 1920'5. Their black straight hair was drawn severely back and knotted at the nape of the neck. They glanced at the bed, as one might, going through a sick room where one's presence is a hindrance, and wanting to get out as ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

I was born November 11, 1911 on a farm in Madison County in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. There were eleven members in our family, besides one who died in infancy. I can't remember too much about that place since we moved to another county when I was four. I remember a baseball diamond near our house. Saturday afternoon women and kids crowded the porch to watch the ball game being played by men of the neighborhood. I also remember my sister Erma and I racing each other around the baseball diamond on other days. We had the usual number of horses, cows, pigs and chickens, also cats and dogs. The creature that I will never forget was a huge turkey gobbler who let small people know that the yard was his domain. He chased us, scared the daylights out of us. He had a lot of red something hanging from his chin when he was angry. We knew to dash inside in a hurry. We used many pieces of homemade furniture. One item was a cradle for the current baby. We all spent most of our fi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREN JANUARY, W,9 This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. We all hurried about in the early morning light helping carry our belongings out so Mr. Throgmorton and Papa and Ben could load the truck. I just couldn't believe that we were really going so far away from home. It was exciting and scary to me just thinking about going sixty miles away and seeing strange new people. Mama had been crying and Papa looked worried like when he was looking for a place for us to move to, but Ben was acting happier than I had ever seen him. He'd told us other children a little bit about Mr. Langley and the old house we would live in during the picking season. He said it was at the end of the road away from the sharecroppers' shacks. He said there was about fifteen sharecroppers' familie...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

OZARK DREAMS (Continued from page 4.) the road almost to the end of our journey. All the time we sat there in the road all the children and women just stared at us with blank expressionless faces and never uttered a word but just as we drove past the last hut one boy hollered, "Hey lookie, there goes another load of Arkansas hillbillies. Theys going to help us pick this here long staple cotton." We came to a stop just behind a red pickup truck from which a black man got out to take an arm load of letters, papers and catalogues from a huge mailbox that was lettered Byron Joseph Langley 11. Ben called from the truck and asked him where Mr. Langley was. The man answered, "I'm Mr. Moses and Mr. Langley done said for y'all to move in the house at the end of the road yonder. You is the Duncan family ain't y'all?" When Ben said yes he said to follow him. The few moments we were there, we got our first look at the Langley's castle like house. It was like a dream castle sitting back behind a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 At 4:45 on the morning of September 1,1939, without a declaration of war, Germany invaded Poland. This was the opening chapter of World War Two. This would end a way of life for all of us in the Green River Community of Kentucky, although the transformation did not happen overnight. After the Nazi blitzkrieg against Poland came a period know as the "phony war". Many people in America thought the war would last a few weeks, then grind to a halt as both sides realized the folly of it all. Then, on May 10, 1940, the Germans unleashed the invasion of France and the low countries. Suddenly, there was a realization that the dove of peace had truly flown. Still, life in our area continued to go on as it had for decades. However, if one were superstitious, he might have read omens into the strange events that happened about that time. As all -year old boy I was considered by many of my peer groups as "having it made". My family ran one of the three resta...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

DEVIL IN OUR TOWN (Continued from page 6.) query, I am from everywhere and have been everywhere. I was under the apple tree with Eve. I have been in the front lines of every war, and I was on the deck of the ship that brought the first slaves to this continent." Lee was totally unprepared to counter this sort of response. "Do - do y-you want to go to Heaven?" he stammered weakly. "Let me see." the stranger said thoughtfully. "Do I want to go to Heaven? My understanding is that they sing hymns and play harps all day. I don't sing well and I don't like harp music. But in the final condemnation of the place, I understand that it is populated with pompous asses like you. No, Sir, I must decline the invitation." "Blasphemy!" Lee shouted, and stalked away. But he did what he came for. That night, he delivered a searing blast at the stranger and called him the Devil dressed in the flesh and blood of man. "The Devil has come among us!" he thundered from the pulpit. "I saw the mark upon him....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 Great Aunt Almoth Scholz, 81, is blessed with a vivid memory. Stories told by her mother, everybody called her Grandma Lockhart (Effie Emma Peace) remain crystal clear today .Effie Emma's father, James Peace (born January 30,1844) opened a boot making shop in Asheville, North Carolina during the 1880's. Effie Emma was fortunate to have such an attentive father. He would hang his work vest and pendant gold watch around her neck. She became fascinated by boot making and in no time the eager little beaver could tack soles, half soles and heels. She started by stretching shoes or boots over a metal shoe last, an implement designed to secure shoe material in the form of a foot, then she whacked away with a tack hammer. This 100 year old metal last has a hand carved base and sits on my father's fireplace hearth. Effie Emma Peace had fiery blue eyes and she could climb a tree like a squirrel, a true tomboy. When Keniaun Lockhart came over to the Peace h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

The setting is that of a calendar or a greeting card. A white cinder block church with an old style steeple. A brick addition has been built on the back of the church, giving the overhead appearance of a large "T". Oak trees form a natural fortress around the church and parking lot. A white board fence set on the property line completes the setting. No matter the compass reading, the panoramic view is the same - rolling hills and mountains. A few farm houses and barns are visible. It is quiet - it is serene. Town and city life seem far away. The only abrupt sound is the bell in the steeple, cutting the silence for late-comers to hurry. The sound is pleasant as it races across the fields, down the hollows and echos off the mountain sides. The church is Saunders Grove Church of the Brethren, located in Bedford County, Virginia. The pastor is elderly, but young at heart, Fred Jordon. What is found in the parking lot on Sunday morning? A few vehicles seem appropriate in the country sett...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 Back in the year of 1909, we lived in the mountains near Meadows of Dan, Virginia. It was tough going sometimes. Everything was done the hard way with not much to do it with, but mountain folk did not sit down and hold their children on their laps and watch them starve to death. They went out and did everything they could do to scratch a living out for them. My mom's life was a hard one but she did not complain much at any time. She would get up early in the morning and build fires in the cook stove and fireplaces. My dad would stay in bed until about all the work was done and then Mom would call him to get up and eat his breakfast. She had to parch green coffee and grind it for coffee. Then she would get out the old dough tray and throw in two sifters of flour, put in a little baking powder and some salt and soda, a hand full of hog lard and she would make some of the best hoe cake bread anyone would want to eat. She would fry out some streaked...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

MORE MEMORIES OF GRANDPA VAUGHN Grandpa never talked much about the gruesome happenings during the Civil War. I think he tried to forget that part of the whole experience. However, I remember his story about the time he and several hundred other prisoners, after being captured at Manassas, were walked all the way to the prison at Point Lookout, Maryland. They spent one night on the courthouse lawn at Winchester. His only possessions were a small knapsack and a blanket! So using his knapsack as a pillow on the door sill of the courthouse he slept wrapped up in his blanket. More than once I have stopped at the Winchester Courthouse and looked at the door sill that I believe is the one he slept on. Then the rest of the story is, after the war was over six months later, he was let out of the prison in Maryland with his knapsack and blanket and was on his own to get back hpme to Virginia anyway he could.Upon leaving with another man, whose name I have forgotten, they were asked by a Yank...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 The Mail Box Dear Sir, Please send me your Laurel Library Number 2. I love The Mountain Laurel and I read it from cover to cover then I pass it on to my daughters to "learn" what mountain life was like. It's the greatest little paper anywhere! God Bless, D. M. Testerman Collinsville, Virginia Dear Mountain Laurel, I would like to subscribe to The Mountain Laurel. Enclosed is a check for a two year subscription. I recently read a back issue and truly enjoyed it. My grandfather, the late Solomon West, a son of the late Charles and Cora Hylton West, moved from Meadows of Dan, Virginia to West Virginia when he was a young man, so I find the material in your publication interesting. Thank you, E. W. Ash Union, West Virginia Dear Susan, I was born and raised in Marion, North Carolina in the early 1930'5. My dad came home with a record for the R. C. A. Victor. The song was about the Aliens and the Hillsville Courthouse Tragedy. I cannot remember the ex...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

GENEALOGY I GENEALOGY I am trying to establish my family tree linking myself to George Birdwell, born about 1721, probably in Stafford County, Virginia. He owned land in Botetourt County, Virginia (in the bent of the James River) in 1751. In 1780 he moved to the Holsten River which was in North Carolina, but later became Sullivan County, Tennessee. He died in Bedford County, Virginia in 1781. His second wife was Mary. They had a son, Benjamin, born December 21, 1765, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and died October 17, 1840. He had children of which one son was Jesse (born 1805) - this is the missing link here. My grandfather was Jesse Birdwell, birth date unknown. He died about 30 years old in 1918. He lived in Johnson City, Tennessee. My father was Jesse and I am Jesse. My father was born in Johnson City, Tennessee approximately 1911.1 was born in Koxville, Tennessee in 1945. "*4- Subscribe Today Jgaurel or * Jgdurei Send a Friend a Gift to The Mountain Laurel Monthly J...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 SPECIAL GENEALOGY I would like to know about a man named Jack Nolen, he was from the Shooting Creek area near the Floyd County line in Virginia. I would like to know some of his children's names. My mother was a Nolen and her father's name was Jack J. Nolen and his wife's name was Claranda Nolen. if anyone has any information on or of these people please contact me. Panzie Aho Rt. 6, Box 1080 Bassett, VA 24055 THE BERRY SWAP BY: DEIDRE M. THIGPEN © 1989 When I was about seven or eight years old we were living in Meadows of Dan, Virginia in a section known as Belcher Mountain. We had the usual farm with horses, a cow, a dog, cats, pigs and chickens. But out of all of our chickens we didn't have a rooster. So one day I struck up a deal with a neighbor, Mr. Handy. If I would pick him a bucket of blackberries he would trade me a young rooster for them. I thought it was a pretty easy deal, but picking all of those blackberries down by the pond wasn't...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

There were few things Mama hated more than rain—in any form. Drizzle dampened her enthusiasm. Sprinkling made her sleepy. Mist made her moodiest of all. It was just enough to ruin the day, she said, because it kept you guessing. Downpours were at least straight forward enough to make you give up any hope of leaving the house. "Why don't you buy an umbrella?" Papa had suggested once. "Because I'd never use it, that's why," Mama answered. The few times Mama actually had to leave the house on wet days, it was funny to watch her. She'd dash to the car with her coat over her head instead of her, as if she was afraid she'd melt if a drop fell on her. One summer during vacation, it rained for a straight week. I thought mama would go crazy for sure. After five days, I started getting bored, and I think my baby sister was restless, too. Mama wrote lots of letters and baked lots of cookies. She sewed a colorful quilt for Aunt Bonnie, who was due to have her baby in a month. "How's this for a ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1989 Memory is a precious gift -' That we build up day by day But like out youth, before we know it, Sometimes it just fades away. A famous writer wrote a story That said we couldn't go home again - But I think we can, if we search our minds, And remember the things that happened then. I hope that I can find the words That will express the way I feel: And take us back to yesterday - When these memories all were real. The o 1 d house we were born in Still stands high upon the hill: The echos of our younger days - Are locked within it - still. Our mama and our papa worked From dawn into the night: To buy us things we had to have In those early years of life. We did not have material things - But that was no big deal: They gave us lots of love and care - And that's what's truly real. All those years have come and gone So very fast it seems: Our memories fade, get so dim The past seems like a dream. But, there are things still very clear After all the pa...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1989

MEMORIES (Continued from page 16.) Opened up her pickled peaches. As Christmas neared, excitement surged: Time seemed to go by slow, We longed for goodies that were to come - And hoped that it would snow. When Christmas morning finally came Our hearts were filled with joy: We got oranges, nuts, candy, And most of all, some toys! Our parents could not get us much, As times were tough and bad - They did the very best they could, With the little that they had. Our happy days of childhood Are now gone - just like the wind: Only in memory may we return - To the way things were back then. But, the old house still stands, Full of memories - so bitter and so sweet, Of Mama's always busy hands: The patter of her children's feet. Our house was always crowded: But we managed to survive, As older children married and left, Some younger ones arrived. Harvey maixied Eula Kizer At a very early age, Robert chose Minnie Walker, Young marriages were the rage. Next one to leave was Viola, Earl Medford...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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