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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Transition program would link farmers (Continued from page 1) Agricultural Statistics Service. "Quite a few people are working directly in agriculture and quite a few are working because of agriculture," Baker said. "Agriculture is what makes a place a nice place to live. If you didn't have agriculture in Virginia, Virginia wouldn't be what it is." Even Hollywood movie makers have come to the Old Dominion to film parts of movies on Virginia farms. Courter put together a task force, which compiled a report titled "Virginia Agriculture, 2010: A Transition Strategy." The year 2010 was chosen, Courter said, because "if we position ourselves, we would assure that farm assets don't turn into subdivisions. 2010 is when we hope to be well along the way to accomplishing this." Task force findings include: 50 percent of the U.S. farm population is 55 and older; 25 percent of the U.S. farm population is 65 and older and the average U.S. farmer is 52. Task force recommendations, r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be RECEIVED (not mailed) by the 10th of each month preceding the publication month. The September and October issues are combined, as well as the December and January issues. The deadline for the September/October issue is August 10 and the deadline for the December/January issue is...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Feb. 6: Virginia Cow-Calf Management Course, Blackstone, Feb. 10-! 2: American"Farm Bureau Federation National Leadership Conference, Sparks, NV. Contact Jonathan Shouse, VFBF corporate Feb. (1-12: Computer Classroom on Wheels Workshop, Smyth County. Contact Henry Snodgrass, Feb. 12: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly breakfast meeting, Holiday Inn Crossroads, Landowners can get help planting trees RICHMOND—Farmers and other landowners interested in reforesting or planting trees can apply for cost-share assistance through the Forestry Incentives Program. The FIP, offered through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, helps landowners plant and manage private forestlands. Throughout the 1999 fiscal year, the NRCS is offering continuous sign-ups for the FIP. Up to $340,000 is available to owners or operators of land planted in pines or hardwoods. "The money is to help landowners replant existing timberland, or to convert ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. > Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. # Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. » Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I DEADLINE: Ads must be RECEIVED (not mailed) by the 10th of each month preceding the publication month. The September and October issues are combined, as well as the December and January issues. The deadline for the September/October issue is August 10 and the deadline for the December/January issue is November 10. I Repeat ads m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Feb. 6: Virginia Cow-Calf Management Course, Blackstone, Lynchburg and Orange. Contact john Hall. 540-231-9)53. Feb. 9-11: Price Risk Management Workshop, Bowling Green. Contact Mac Saphir, 804-633-6550. Feb. 10-12: American Farm Bureau Federation National Leadership Conference, Sparks, NV. Contact Jonathan Shouse, VFBF corporate secretary, 804-784-1381. Feb. 11-12: Computer Classroom on Wheels Workshop, Smyth County. Contact Henry Snodgrass, 540-676-6309. Feb. 12: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly breakfast meeting, Holiday Inn Crossroads, Landowners can get help planting trees RICHMOND—Farmers and other landowners interested in reforesting or planting trees can apply for cost-share assistance through the Forestry Incentives Program. The FIP, offered through the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service, helps landowners plant and manage private forestlands. Throughout the 1999 fiscal year, the NRCS is offering continuous sig...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ V personalized service can be as close as your own community. ' *> j u f Health Care Coverage O 1 Broad Range oi 9 jf y QU are unc j er a g e 55 — f or individuals or families H Coverage • if y OU are G ver age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. HESsZIS You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! Iltnail. AVAILABLE THROUGH FARM BUREAU FOR MEMBERS O...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News„ Volume 58, Number 2 "There's precious little that a Virginia farmer can do to participate in the export market directly," Rich said. "But if you look at the total numbers, if exports are going up, then farmers are better off than if they were going down." The most significant change in exports has been in processed, or "value-added" products. Officials with the U.S. Department of Volunteered time is money to a politician By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—If you can't contribute money to a politician's campaign, then volunteer your time, a media relations and lobbying consultant said. "A politician told me money buys access; time will buy loyalty," said Joel Blackwell, president of the Issue Management Co., a media relations and grass roots lobbying firm in Alexandria. Blackwell spoke on Jan. 30 to more than 100 farmers at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Young Farmers' Conference. The Agriculture estimate that in 1999, processed food exports wi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News Equipment is major expense in farm start-up (Continued from page 1) Dunn, a young peanut and cotton grower in Sussex County. "I didn't have much start-up costs. "I honestly don't see how in my area anybody could just start up a farm, especially in cotton and peanut production," he added. "There are enormous equipment costs." A starting point for equipment these days is a tractor with a cab. An enclosed cab protects the operator from rain, the sun, dust and crop protectant sprays. A new 110 horse-power tractor is sufficient for many medium-size Virginia farms and could cost $100,000, said Dr. Jim Pease, Extension farm management specialist with the Virginia Cooperative Extension in Blacksburg. A year of use of this tractor could drop its market value down to $55,000. u Farmers make up only 2 percent of the population, and a typical farmer produces food for 129 Americans, What happens if that farmer retires and isn't replaced? The average age of farmers in Virginia is...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 Farm definition debate is true wake-up call Imagine some urban politician telling you that your beef or dairy or poultry operation is not a farm and therefore is subject to a number of new restrictions under industrial use. In other words, he or she would be saying you are disqualified as a farmer. Believe it or not, Farm Bureau faced that kind of thinking during the just completed 1999 General Assembly. Fortunately, all bills pertaining to this particular subject were fought off, thanks to our dedicated members and other ag groups. But this year's legislative climate should serve as a wake-up call for all producers. Many of these potentially devastating issues are likely to re-surface in years to come. Had House Bill 1923 passed, virtually every livestock producer in Virginia would have been reclassified under some name Freedom to farm is still the best policy Freedom is a word that has been bandied about in agricultural circles during the past 12 months or so. Commodity...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Nursery products are leading ag commodity RlCHMOND—Virginia agriculture is continuing its gradual change toward more non-tradi-tional crops and fewer full-time farmers, according to the 1997 Census of Agriculture. Taken every five years, the census offers farmers, business and policy-makers a snapshot of the nation's most basic industry, agriculture. For instance, the number of farms in the Old Dominion dropped from 42,222 in 1992 to 41,095 in 1997. The census can also be used to forecast changes based on past trends, like a shift away from row crops and livestock raised for food. "What we are seeing are some new and emerging sectors like horses and nursery, sort of non-traditional areas, showing growth since 1992," explained Steve Manheimer, statistician for the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service, "Our more traditional areas were pretty steady over the last five years." "The success story since '92 was the nursery and greenhouse industry, whi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 Coyotes are coining to a neighborhood near you RICHMOND—Coyotes continue to kill sheep, goats and cattle in Virginia, and now they're eating domestic cats as they progress eastward, a wildlife biologist said. In response, a state senator called for a bounty on coyotes. Under bounty plans, hunters in certain localities typically collect payments for each coyote tail or pair of ears they hand over to authorities. Virginia Sen. Madison E. Marye, D-Shawsville, chairman of the Senate Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources Committee, introduced the bill allowing local governments to establish bounties to kill coy- Monsanto helps students attend college RICHMOND—Profits from a Midwest agriculture research company's patented seed technology will be used to help Virginia students further their education. Monsanto, a science and agriculture technology company in St. Louis, has teamed up with the American Farm Bureau Federation's Foundation for Agriculture to offer scholars...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News Legal services may run farmers out of business RICHMOND—Gov. Jim Gilmore called for a budget item that would protect Virginia taxpayers from involuntarily subsidizing lawsuits against themselves. The provision, which was under consideration in the Virginia General Assembly at press time, is particularly important to Virginia farmers, who have often been the target of lawsuits filed by state legal services programs on behalf of foreign migrant workers. State funds should be used to help Virginia residents, instead of "recruiting people from out-of-state with the express intention of putting our farmers out of business," explained Libby Whitley, general manager of the MidAtlantic Resources Association, a labor supply and compliance organization. She said legal services aggressively recruits foreign and out-of state farm workers to sue farmers using the H-2A program. That program allows farmers to temporarily hire foreign workers when there aren't enough U.S. laborers ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 Legislation would have drastically changed the legal definition of "farm" in Virginia t ..^o^4^^, s y m yMBBW 4r & j H\o /> -IW* f . —I tj ■ < jW M |C '$$$$>■* '*' • *" i A jMV . ' Jt <- mMy C;';V Wii Mfcii A 1l i « ■ B RlCHMOND—Lawmakers worried some dairy, beef and poultry producers with a proposal that could have re-defined their operations as non-farms. That's what could have happened if House Bill 1923, sponsored by Del. Mitchell Van Yahres, D-Charlottesville, had been written into law. The General Assembly turned down the bill in February. It would have affected hundreds of intensive livestock farms in Virginia. That includes Lynwood Hammock's 330-head dairy operation in Pittsylvania County. "It blows my mind that they'd come up with something like that, because this is a family farm," said Hammock, whose three sons work with him. HB 1923 would change Virginia's Right to Farm legislation to state that the defin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News Hog producers face challenges once again RlCHMOND—Virginia hog producers breathed a sigh of relief as lawmakers killed two bills that could have shut down expansion of their operations. While suffering from perhaps the worst wholesale prices in history, they also faced major regulatory challenges in the Virginia General Assembly in February. Two bills before the House Conservation and Natural Resources Committee sought "through devious means" to shut down any expansion of hog farms in Virginia, according to Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant public affairs director for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "Neither bill would have provided more protection for the environment, but both would have placed significant financial hurdles in front of anyone trying to get into the hog business or expand," Stoneman said. One measure, House Bill 1924, called for an outright moratorium on hog farm construction or expansion unless a grower installs expensive aerobic waste treatme...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 Some groups don't want farmers to make a living By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—A white fence and two cows — that's an ideal farm in the eyes of environmental groups, a lobbyist told young farmers. The Sierra Club and similar environmental groups "don't want you to make money and certainly not put your kids through school by farming," said David Root, an assistant director of public affairs at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "They want you to have only a white fence, two cows, a green field and a tractor that you don't run too early in the morning or at night," Root told nearly 100 farmers at the VFBF Young Farmers' Conference on Jan. 30. "They say: 'You can go out and get real jobs.'" Some environmental special interest groups "are ahead of us by 10 years as far as political involvement," Root said. Those groups already have key lawmakers on their side, especially those in districts that have no farms. "We need to reach out and touch" lawmakers who...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News EPA action could make pest control more costly By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG — Roaches in your kitchen and ticks in your yard may become more difficult and costly to control if the Environmental Protection Agency takes an accelerated approach in banning certain chemicals, a pesticide expert said. Dr. Mike Weaver, coordinator of Virginia Tech pesticide programs, said EPA needs to take a moderate approach in banning certain chemicals used in pesticides. That way, scientists and manufacturers will have time and incentive to develop more advanced pesticides, including many lower risk alternatives to chemical pesticides, he added. Congress passed the Food Quality Protection Act in 1996 to enhance the safety of the food supply by regulating chemical usage on crops and to make sure Americans don't receive too much exposure to strong chemicals at home and work. The law requires that all tolerances for chemicals be re-evaluated for risk, using updated sta...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 Women's conference to stress balanced lifestyle Farm Bureau women will learn how to make a difference — in their communities, on their farms, and in all other aspects of their lives. They will get lessons from Donna Tyson, the workshop speaker for this year's Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Conference March 7-9 in Bristol. Mrs. Tyson is a former TV and radio talk show host, who runs D.R. Tyson Management Inc. in Fredericksburg. She was named one of The Society of Human Resource Young farmers are involved across state The 1999 growing season is almost here. We've had a mild winter so far, and when spring arrives, we'll probably say, "Been there — done that." The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers group had its annual Young Farmer Leadership Conference in Blacksburg Jan. 29-31. We had about 125 attendees at the conference and all seemed to have a good time. Each year, the conference is a great time for young farmers to get together. We can talk one-on-one...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News Students build bee houses to help orchardists By CHRISTOPHER BROOKE Special to the Farm Bureau News HILLSVILLE —In seeing the construction of "bee houses," one might think Carroll County Intermediate School students are doing the work normally assigned to male honeybees. The students are building houses for orchard mason bees, which are taking on the job of pollinating Virginia's fruit and vegetable crops. Orchardists have seen a drastic decline in the European Honeybee population, which once did a great job of pollination. The decline in these honeybees is due to varroa and trachea mites, which are parasites that use the bees as hosts. In recent years, orchardists have noticed a drop in their harvests because of the toll on the pollen-spreading bees. The bee house construction project is the brainchild of fruit growers, Virginia Cooperative Extension agents and educators. Carroll County's 4-H groups, Future Farmers of America chapter and the intermediate school are...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

March 1999 Farm Bureau attracts top employees By CINDY DeGAIN Director of Human Resources RICHMOND —"Helping you is what we do best" is not only a slogan at Virginia Farm Bureau, but it is what we believe and demonstrate in everything we do. When opening the mail, settling a claim, purchasing tires, lobbying lawmakers or helping the media in your county, service is what our employees are all about. When we recruit new employees for Virginia Farm Bureau, we look for customer service skills, by asking candidates questions like: "When have you gone above and beyond the call of duty in your present position?" We are looking for times when the person has made a decision that helped the customer even when it was beyond their job description. Many of our employees are referrals from other employees and even members have sent us their sons and daughters. We are involved in a project of Goochland County High School called the "Schools that Work Project." Through this project, we encourage ju...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1999

Farm Bureau News (A Free Service to Members) Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau. One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. > Please TYPE your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. (You do not have to use this coupon.) I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be received by the STH of each month preceding the publication month. > Repeat ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. > Ads MUST include member number to be published. (For your convenience we are providing this coupon. Please submit ads to the Farm Bureau News before the sth.) NAME: MEMBER NO....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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