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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Railway News. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

Railway News. - BY bYŽITAH. People residing in the vicinity of of the railway stock yards must frequently be awakened from their slumbers in the wee small hours of the morninig by the loud yelping, apparently of dogs, in the direction of the yards. The yelps resemble those of a pack of coyotes on the trail. Investigation has solved the mystery, and the barking does not belong to the canine but human family, and is really that of the transfir porters engaged in the dis charging and reloading of stock, which from some cause, such as stock down, or in trucks with hot boxes, necessitates transferring. So well have these men cultivated the bark that it is only on close inves tigation that the deception is dis covered. The frightened animals, too, must have their fears allayed considerably, on finding that their tormentors do not possess the bite. One well known local stockman plumps for the transfer porters eery time in preference to the dog. One wag even goes so far as to suggest that i...

CORK PAVEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

CORK PAVEMENTS. new cork pavement is favorably rc lrded by the muonicipal authorities in orns cities. It is noiseless to the red, robut at the samne time durable. It ra variety of asphalt paving, in whieh cork is sobstituted for the sand of the ordinaryy kinid, preventing slip sod deadeitng to ln even p'e regree the vibrations from pass igr ehicles. Sbtow does not freeze ing t, and as it is nonI-absorbent its qoditlies 5een imiuch snperior to those of qood jemletnts. ?t is said to "stand" noaheo grades on which the ordinarv hit canntot be used at all, and still ITord a perfectly safe footing. For ·ehools and' hosp~itnls it would seeml to be the ideal pavemint, especially for rottrds, playgrounds, tutd streets 5roaUm the buildliniig. For these pur toes, the noisehlssniess and cleanliliess if the nio pavemtcuent give it a inarkedl aduanftage

Catholic Federation [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

Catholic Federation ' The president of the Australian Cath olic Federation (Mr .F. E. O'Connell) who visited Seymonr last week to inaun srate the Seymour District Council. de. livered an address after Mass on Sunday morning at St. Mary's church. Mr O'Connell stated that the Feder ation had established 380 branches throughout this State. and the member. ship at the end of last year closely ap. proxlmated to 50,000. Already the re turns to hand this year showed an in crease of 12,000 members as compared with the corresponding period for last year. In many of the objects of the Federation a large amount of succus had already been obtained, and this had been very notably the case with regard to the campaign against impure literas ture in which all other denominations have beer, requested to join, with the re colt that a united meeting under the presidency of the Chief Justice (Sir John Madden) bas been held in the Melbourne t'own Hall, and two committees-lay a'idlegal-had been appointed...

CULTIVATION OF CHARACTER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

CULTIVATION OF CHARACTER. Whatever of dignity, whatever of strength, we have in us, will dignify and will make strong the labours of our hand; whatever lIttleness degrades our spirit will lessen-them and drag them down. Whatever noble fire in our hearts will burn also in our work; whatever purity is ours will chasten and exalt it; for as we are our work is; and what we sow in our lives that beyond a doubt we shall reap, for good or for ill, in the strengtliensg or defacing of whatever gifts have falen to our lot. Father: Jaue, are that young man's intentions serious? Daughter: I think so, pa; he says our carriage shed could easily be trans formed into a garage and the attic would make a dandy billiardroom and bowling alley. Tourist: And your ancestors were UEstermen too? Irish Pea5sant: Ancestors! Phwat are ancestorst Tourist: Why, the people you spring from. I.P..(indignantly): Ilook yel The Maadowd's spring from nobody-they spring at tliim. Book Agent: Could I have your sub script...

FERTILITY OF THE SOIL AND HOW TO MAINTAIN IT. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

FERTILITY OF THE SOIL AND HOW TO MAINTAIN IT. Usually, when we think of soils we think of them as finished products- that is, we consider them as something completed when the Creator command ed that there should be light, and that man now has no more power or in fluence over their making than he had over the making of-light or of rooks ani mineral ore. We seem to think that God made the soils in the begin ning, and 1ll that we can do now is to farm them. I The writer contends that this is a very mistaken idea. Strictly speaking, soils are not a finished product; they are constantly undergoing changes. As a general rule, if they are unmolested by man, they are constantly making those changes that will- inorease their fertility. This is true in the foreste and in the prairies. If they are un molested in'any way-their fertility is constantly increasing, no matter how heavy the growth of trees or grass may be each year. If the soils are tilled by man--f they are molested by man, as a ru...

BARBER WHO WAS MAD. M.P'S. STRANGE TALE OF BROAD MOOR. SANE AFTER 24 YEARS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

BARBER WHO WAS MAD. M.P'S. STRANGE TALE OF BROAD. MOORl. SANE AFTER 24 YEARS. An astonishing tale about a "mad" barber, who, in spite of his alleged "'i:adness" was employed to iiye the oflicials of Broadmcor Lunatic Asylum, releved thile tedium of a recent ail-night sitrilg of the House of Comnmous, which laootu until 3.30 in the mornolg. Tlie story was told by Sir Arthur Markham, the Liberal member ior the iial. lield Division, who said that the man was a nat:ve of hIis division. 'lie had been commntted to fifeasylum af ter conviction ou some quite trivial charge," said Sir Arthur, "and had been kept in custody thiere for 24 years. L visited the man a..d formed the opin ion that he was quite sane--as sane at any rate, as some nmemibers of this Hlouse I However the mcdicoal officer of the asylum declared the man to be insane, and no efforts on my part could induc the hInile office to relcase him. I wrote I should thlink, twcenty letter.s to the home Ollice, I visited lBradmooj thre...

THE OLDEST TRADE IN THE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

THE DLDEST TRADE IN THE WORLD. A blacksmith and a gardener were once having an argument as to which was the oldest trade in the world. Tile gardner, of course, insisted that it was gardening, and.in proof quoted from Genesis, "Ad:tm was put into the Garden of Eden to dress it and keep it. "'Ay," retorted the knight of the avil, "but who maode his spadeP"

ATMOSPHERIC CONDENSATION. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

ATMOSPHERIC CONDENSATION. The condensation of nioisturo in the atmosphere--ie., the initial step in the formation of clouds, fog, rain, hails and snow-has been explained for more than a generation by the presence in the air of myriads- of minute (mostly ultra microscopic) ''dust" particles, each of which was supposed to serve as a cen tre of condensation. The well-known instrument invented by Aitkeny in 1888, in which, after a small measured vol ume of air has-been cooled by expan sion, the resulting droplets of water are inspected through a microscope aidd counted, is know as the ''dust-counter," because it has been assumed that the number of drops formed in this process represents the number of padticles of "'dust" in the given volume of air. This idea is intrenched in the very latest works on meteorology in the Eng lish language, though qualified by the admission that in a highly supersatu rated atmosphere, suci-as may be pro duced at will in a labatory but hardly occurs in natur...

A GOOD LIME WASH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

A-GOOD UtME WASH. In reply to anl enquiry a correspon duent forwards a recipe which ho. has proved to be satisfactory. "'Take one bushel of quicktliue, and slack it with boiling water, covering it during the process to keep in the steam. Strain this thlrough a fine.sieve or very line bagging, ant add to itz two peccls of salt dissolved in hot water, 6 lb. of fine whiting or powdered chalk, and 2 lb. of good glue, dissolved in boiling water. 'Then add ten gallons of hot water to the mixture, stir it well, and lot it stand for a few days, covrered from'dust. It should be put on hot. About a pint of this mixture will cover Ssquare yawl of outside woodwork. It is much cheaper than ordinary paint, nd answer s ras well for dresscL tiuber, brick or stone, and is better than paint tor undressed. timber, like slabs and split posts and rails. An ordinary chitewash brush serves for applying it o rough work, but for neat iwork a aint brush muay be used. This wash ioes not rub ofl like the conlm...

SELECTING DAIRY HEIFERS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

SELECTING DAIRY HEIERS. To get the best dairy cpws is every dairyman's desire; but few know how to got them, either by breeding or pur chase, for the reason that they do not know how to select the best for mil or breeding. In breeding for thl dairy it is important to know how to select calves that promise to be tho best milkers, which also makes them the best breeders with which to im prove the herd. Of course, it does not necessarily follow that a cow which will yield a large supply of milk of a higi test will produce heifers equally rau able; but nevertheless it must be as sumed that a cow of the description referred to is more likely to produce a more profitable heifer than a cow possessing no record. Naturally one would not choose as weakling calf when selecting a heifer for the dairy; but at the same time it is not the biggest andi fattest calf that makes the best dairy now. The boneframe--if the term is allowable--is the surest guide to the quality of the future dairy cow. Get...

NATURE AND USE. FERTILISERS EMPLOYED AS A SOURCE OF POTASH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

NATURE AND USE. (By B. Leslie Emslie, C.D.A, P.A.S.I, F.O.S.) FERTILISERS EMPLOYED AS A 0SOURCE OF PDTASH. From a study of the early history of fertilising, it.appears that the mater ials employed were largely phosphatio and nitrogenous. When Leibig, in his researches aboutl the middle of last century, discovered the importance of potash as a "plant food" and .emon strated the fact that this substance was present in most soils in insufficient quantity for the production of full orops, a new pagoe in the history of fertillsers was commenced. The light of the discovery revealed the cause of certain phenomena which had hitherto remained obscure. For instance, tlhe inoreased fertility of soils where wood ashes had been scattered had often been observed, and-this effect was now trace able to the poteash, which the ashes supplied. . WOOD ASHES. The extraction of potash from wood ashes for exportation to Europe where it was employed in various manufaotarces was at one time a very important...

MELBOURNE LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

MELBOURNE LETTER. ('rom our Special Correspondent). If we may take the , experience of Drighton people as a pointer, it is not ii i\sable to agitate too energetically .vr the general adoption of the auto ,atic telephone as a means of esceape reon the dulcet-toned "engaged," and he many other irritations that attend .he use of this now necessary institu ion under the existing system. So far the manipulation of the automatic :pparatos on the Brighton exchange has ,een huore productive of the conditions Jf brain storm than the old system. she combinations in inany cases refuse to nork at all, and when they do, the result is to make communication undo sired at both ends. TI~ire is the hope ;h:at after a while these defects will le remedied. Meanwhile Brighton's lan gmuage is more suitable for J. B. Shaw's latest plays than for use in the busi ucns places and homes of respectable citizens. We are all hero worshippers. That is an important part of Nature's plan to maintain the survival of...

TEACHING OF EUGENICS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

TEACHING OF EUGENICS. Speaking of the "Progress of Euge nies" at thi? Royal Institution, Dr. Saleeby said that America had made the mbst thorough-going investigations, but the results, valuable though they ?dere for the time, were based on in sufliciently scientific foundations, and would have to be done over this side loose thinkers, ready to traced every thing to hereditary, had laid down the mlost stringent laws for the eugenic con duct of society, so nmuh so that one might almost say that no one whose ancestors had died from any cause should be allowed to marry; but the scientist knew that the day was still distant When he could speak with au thority. The investigator of eugenics must wait upon the -teachings of the anthropologist and sociologist.

TIRED OF MILKING FOR FUN. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

TIRED OF MILKING FOR iUUi.. Farnmer A (in auto): "Good muriing neighbour I Fine day thisl" -1armer B (m waggon): "'Yes, toler ably. Going?to qit nmillong?"' arnmer A: "No, not nulirely. I'm just going to quit milking for sun " /B: ,":'ell, how's that?" A: "These cows are eating their heads offl" B: "They are, cih? But how do you know?" A: "I just weigh and test the milk from the herd and keep a.record. Each oow gets credit for the miilk she pro diuces, also for the calf and the ma nure, then shi is charged for the cost of maintenance." B: "But isn't that an awful lot of work?" A: "Well, it does take a few minutes a dayn, but I believe 1 get" a dollar an hour for this work. You see it makes all the other work count. Before I kept records I splent hours of labor on these cows, and they didn't even pay for their feedl. The labor was all wasted. It alone amounts to about 20 dollars per year "for each coa, to say nothing of the feed she consumas." B: "Wlhat is the matter.. with that brin...

NEWS SUMMARY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

NEWS SUMMARY. n ocv w-hose case created a fonel, 'o discussionl a couple of god dea ,hen the thlen Minister for rs a'~.itelirs (31r. Josiah ThIomas), nristerun tleo deportatlion of Ills iJsi?s?d fal.ily to China, is expected ri-e° e t lo GtelOng on Friday.- Let e to tlrat eftlect have during the nteIrt eCek be'enI receivedtl. from ilr. pelen il whio will return with the olj'O of ejaglog in business again. ibjea , Inber of country centres re bslh nurses ilve been installed, here :seces have been readily avail eiof ?L 1the Eduealtiol deparntment. ,l t es chrry out a pamrtial mledical The riua n of thle physica! condietio Se .scdolcs, r and fIurnish reports to of thrdical staff iin Melbournes. T'ly. th fe theu childrenl simple instruc ii , 1ersonal hygIiene. The MIinis tfor u'blic aInstruection (Mr. Living e,) strongly favors an extensidn of ,).. etice, and intends to bring ,the .t' eforle the Cabinet, so tiait it Ie p Ice l onl a busilness basis. The unit. of tie Royal Australian ., c...

WINTER CARE OF SHEEP. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

WINTER CARE OF SHEEP. The coming round of the winter, season is always a matter of some con cern to the sheep-farmer, p~articularly if he has under his care a fairly largo number of sheep,:for this timoe of the year is one in. which it is extremely difficult rto keep up the flock to theo level of perfeootion which may hare been attained during the sumnmer season. This time is naturally re garded as one in which the ewes put on flesh, grow sthe best part of their wool, rear their lambs, and get fit for withstanding the rigours of the suc ceeding winter. Yet the up-to-date man is never content with accepting such a sweeping statement in itsstrict ly literal sense. The flock which is not an improving one-is retrogressive; so it comes to pass that unless the sheep are kept in good condition dur ing the worst part of the year they are going to do little good t&o their owner, and might just as well not be on the farm at all. It therefore comes to pass that the most unproductive se...

Football. Seymour v. Rushworth, [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

* Football. Seymour v. Rushworth, There was a fair attendance at this match' at the King's Park on Wednesday last, and the supporters of the home team were well pleased with the improvement made in all aspects of the gameby local players. The result was never in doubt from the start, as Seymour predominated in every quarter. Rushworth opened briskly and for the first five minutes had their opponents in difficulties, but only a point was the outcome. Seymour then took charge, with the result that before the end of the quarter -M'Ivor bag ged three goals. Rushworth were also rewarded with a goal after a smart rush down the centre.: The second bout was all in favor of the maroons, who scored 3 goals 2 be hinds to 1 behind. M'Ivor was re sponsible for two of these, and "Babe" Pearce the other. The third quarter was more evenly con tested, Rushworth playing with more vim than in the previous quarter. . Beinett scored a nice goal for them, and Houston did a similar service for the home te...

OF RURAL INTEREST [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

OF RURAL INTEREST (By "Rusticus.") "Agriculture is an art based on science and capable of great develop mieit and expansion as the scientifice principles on which it is based become more and more completely understood." says Mr. A. L. V. Richardson, M.A., B.Sc., Agricultural Superintendent for the Department of Agriculture, in an excellent article in the "Journal of Ag riculture." That embodies a hard fact that cannot be too often or too emphatically impressed upon the men who have the destinies of this country in their keeping-the men who are de veloping its rural production. Mr Rich ardson points out: "The.primary object of the scientific investigator of agricultural problems is to discover the principles or laws under lying agricultural phenomena in order to explain and also anticipate farm practice. The investigator may pro ceed in the elucidation of these prob lems either by observation or by ex periment. The use of definitely plan ned, cirefully conducted experiments is the mo...

Avenel v. Murchison. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

Avenel v. Muarchison An association match was played tt Avenel on Wednesday with the 1 Yurchison representatives, result ng in a win for the home team, he scores being - Avenel, 6-15; Kurchison, 6-5. The play was fast md clean. The red' ana whites a tince the opening of the season 1 save made wonderful improvement. :t would be hard to individualise I he players in the match, but Burns, Johnstone, Jordan, Tonkin, I Dumnmins and Hallsall did yeoman service for Avenel. During the ,lay Holloway, Fontana and Cum nina ?eceived injuries. Winslow umpired the game and rave general satisfaction. Boun lary umpires were employed which Jave an impetus to thegame., Enroa beat Nagambie. 7* * ***c Very little business was trans scted at the special meeting of dele gates held on Monday night last. rhe meeting was arranged for the purpose of dealing with several pro rests, but owing to the non-attend ance of the delinquents, consider ition was deferred. Delegates ex pressed their annoyance with the p...

DAIRYING ON IRRIGATED LAND. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 3 July 1914

DAIRYING ON IRRIGATED LAND. A most interesting point has arisen in regard to the high percentage of fat which the dairy oows are yielding at the Yanco State farm in New South Wales. This institution is situated in the irrigation scheme at. Yaunco, about 200 miles from the coast. It was noticed last. year that the Jerseys whicoh had been transferred to this farm gave much higher fat yields than animals of the same breed on the coast. The point was watched, and it".is now declared that the increase refers to all breeds. It is suggested that the at mosphere, being drier, might have had the effect, while the rainfall being db muoh less than the coast, the cows have fewer storms to face, and are thus not distresed so muoh. It is also urged that the cows are maintained in a uniformly bjetter condition and heart all the year through, for on the coast the feed fluctuates more when dry spells pinch it. Whatever is the rea son, the point is interesting. It like wise supports the belief that d...

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