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Elephind.com contains 21,400 items from Rochester Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A STORY OF GOLDSMITH. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

rt SJORY OF GOLDSIVIITtt. Among the anecdotes told o£ Gold smith while at college is one indica tive of that prompt, but thoughtless and. often whimsical benevolence which throughout life formed one.of t£e most eccentric yet endearing points of his character. He was en gaged to breakfast one day with a college inmate, but failed to make his appearance. His friend repaired to his room, knocked at the door, and was bidden to enter. To his surprise he found Goldsmith in his bed, immersed to his chin in feathers. A serio-comic story explained the circumstance. In the course of the preceding evening's stroll, he had met with a woman with five children, who implored his char ity. Her husband was in the hospital: she was just from the country, a stranger and destitute, without food or shelter for her helpless offspring. This was too much for the kind hean of Goldsmith. He was almost as poor as herself, it is true, ami had no money in his pocket; but he brought her to the college gate, gave...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Barbers who slaave dogs are iu de- ! rnand in Paris. Some ot the | shaved animals arc fantastically j shorn, leaving rings of hair adorn- i ing their bodies, alternating with j denuded strips. Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, j I-'or Coughsaud Colds, never fails, Is. ' Ladies Please Note. j XADIKS are requested to note The J Offices of the Ladies College of Health, have been removed from '16 Elizabeth Street, to Phair's Buildings. 327-3i9 Collins Street; Melbourne, | The College has the sole agency iu Vie: ! toria for Dr D, M. Cooulcy's famous Change Lily Treatment, which for the past 25 years has been effecting such wonderful' cures among women in al parts of Australia, l'or the benefit of sufTcrers, and for those into whose homes King Baby has failed to appear, a free valuable medical book will be sent to anyone writing to Dept. 15 The Ladles College of Health, Phair's Build ing, 325 Collins Street, Melbourne. MILK DELIVERED TWICE DAILY during the-summer months, commencing November 1...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR QUIET MOMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

FOR QUIET MOMENTS. Words are the coin of thought. Content is the short cut to happi ness. Aim at the highest and at least you soar. The sweetest grapes hang nighest That is gold what is worth gold. We make our disappointments by being too exacting. The streams ot small pleasures fill the lake of happiness. By the street By-and-bye we arrive at the house of Never. Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without one. Soon ripe, soon rotten; soon wise, soon foolish. He who has no plagues makes him self some. It is our own most prominent fault that looks ugliest in another. It is by what we do, not by what is done for us, that we become strong or good. The man who has no money in his purse must have honey in his mouth. When men are full of envy, they disparage everything, whether it be good or bad. He who would eat the kernel must crack the nut—he who would have the gain must have the pain.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Wheat For Milling Purposes. A 20 GUINEA CUP OFFERED. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Wheat For Milling Purposes. A 20 GUINEA CUP OFFERED. At a recent meeting of the exe cutive of the Victorian Millowuers;' Association, and as the sequel to a long; discussion on the merits of more suitable wheat for milling purposes, than have been produced in the past, it was decided, with the object of encouraging the "Come back" variety (which is well re garded in many quarters, both in this State, as well as in New South Wales and South Australia), to make the following offer through columns of the press, likewise by the aid of agricultural societies: That the associa'ion (through its members), is prepared to pay 3d per bushel more than the rate pre vailing for wheat, f.a.q. standard, for a parcel of "Comeback" va riety, true to type, of 5000 bushels of good milling quality, or less, with a minimum of 300 bushels, such wheat to be grown, north of the Dividing Range, and delivered dur ing January, 1915." In addition the association will supplement the above by offering a cup value...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Gone Astray. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Gone Astray. "My child, what is an erring man?" said a teacher at a day school examin ation in Brighton to the 'brightest pu pil. "The fishmonger," was the prompt reply.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A STRANGE COINCIDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

A STRANGE COINCIDENCE. A curious incident occurred 36 hours after leaving Southampton. A large bird perched itself on the sum mit of the main mast, a sailor went up and caught it and brought it down, and it proved to be a brown owl! I am superstitious about owls, and was v ry depressed, especially as I had left my favorite sister ill. The sailors tied a string around the poor, dazed creature's leg and were rather ill treating it, so I offered them two shil lings for the bird, which they accept ed, and I then let it out of my port hole. The captain told me that they often caugh'E even smaller birds on the mast, especially when the wind was blowing off the land. On arriv ing at Lisbon we received a telegram to say that 36 hours after my depar ture, my sister had passed away, and also Lady Macdonell, the wife of Gen eral Sir A. Macdonell, my brother-in law—it was a strange coincidence!— "Reminiscences of a Diplomatic .bite, by Lady Macdonell.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"HE IS A BRICK." [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

"HE IS A BRICK." I do not know how tliis slang phrase originated. It is used mainly by boys and young men. When they find a comrade who is generous and jolly, they say: "He is a brick." But I thought of it the other day when visiting the superintendent of a large smelting works. I saw them making up a load for the Mint. The gold that had been refined was in lumps the size and shape of a ibrick. The superintendent told me that each of those bricks was ^vorth about £300, and added that in these days of hydraulic mining it had cost about as much as it was worth. I could not help thinking- about the possible feature of those bricks. Some of them will be well invested, and will be represented ten or twen-! ty years hence by beautiful homes, j fruitful orchards, or benevolent in-1 stitutions. Some of them will be I represented by wrecked lives and ruin ed souls. As I passed down the street I saw a group of young men standing at the corner, and heard one of them say: "John, you are a brick...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Examples. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Examples. "They say that unions raise the price of labor." "Quite right! Two o£ my clerks got married last week and struck me for more salary." Some women marry for money, some for love, and some for a home. It is not known why men marry.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Another Epigram. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Another Epigram. Once at a dinner at which Dr. Emil Reich was present the conversation turned- on marriage. "That was a wise saying of the old Gr ek philosopher," said someone. " 'Whether you marry her or not you will regret it.'" "Yes," answered Dr. Reich. "It re minds me of a certain old maid who once said something almost as good as that. 'Auntie,' said her little niece to her, 'what would you do if you had your life to live over again?' -"To which the lonely spinster quick ly replied: " 'Get married, my child, before I had sense enough to decide to be an old' maid.'"

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Blaming Mother. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Blaming Mother. "My mother made me what i amy said the political speaker as lie proud ly threw out his chest. "Well," said a small man at the rear of the hall, "she must have put in some of her time at other things."-; As soon as a woman knows what she wants, she generally gets it. it's when she does not know what she ■ wants that she baffles the philoso pher. Bear your troubles manfully. Every one endured bravely strengthens your 'character; {.eery one shirked weakens it: : . ■ ■ ■ "To make the wheels of the day's work-run smoothly," says the village philosopher, "there's nothing lilre a little oil. Harsh, peremptory com mands only exact grudging service. :Courtesy and. consideration inspire spontaneous and conscientious -work in return. :/ Anne Teeke: Mr. Gasser is such an interesting talker. Always says some thing one never hears from anyone else. Miss Gynique: Has he been propo sing to you, too?

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
His Reason. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

His Reason. "It (says here 'One f the idols most revered by the Koreans is the figure of a woman, seated, resting her chin in her hand,'" said Mrs. Chatterley, reading from the newspaper. "Which proves that the Koreans are about the wisest nation on earth," suggested her husband. "How's that, Joshuti?" ■ "Well," said Mr. Chatterley, with distinct emphasis, "simply .because they make a deity of a woman who has sense enough to give her chin a rest."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Helping the Editor. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Helping the Editor. A country editor, who is also an au thority on certain industrial matters, recently, came • up to town, bringing his wife along with him. 'This good woman was one after noon the guest of a rather patronising clubwoman. "So your husband is an editor?" the latter aslced. . "Yes." 'Since you have no family and have "tonsideraib'e leisure on your hands, I dare say you assist him in his edi torial work?" "Oh, yes," said the editor's ^ife, who is also his cook, "I edit all his inside matter."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Might Be Good—In Parts. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Miaht Be Good—In Parts. ,--A y ung artist once persuaded Whistler to come and view his latest effort. The two stood before the can vas for some moments in silence. Fi nally, the young man asked timidly: "Don't yc u. think, sir, that this paint ing of mine is—well—er—tolerable?" Whistler's eyes twinkled danger ously. "What is your opinion of a toler able egg?" he asked.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Brute! [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Brute! Mrs. De Bride was entertaining call ers. After they had left she remarked to her husband: "I hope they didn't see my walking shoes lying there. They would think me very untidy if they did." "Oh, if they saw them they prob ably thought they were mine," an swered the husband in a consoling tone. : And she hasn't spoken to him since.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
There! [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

There! ■ "What do you think of Miss Cali hope's voice?" whispereTl the tall girl with the mountainous pompadour. "She sings like a pirate," growled the rude man in the starry vest. "Like a pirate? Gracious! And what is the resemblance?" "She's rough on the high C's."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Hopeful. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Hopeful. A stranger entered church in the middle of the sermon and seated him self in the back pew. After a while he began to fidget. Leaning over to the white-haired man at his side, he whispered: "How long has he been preaching?" "Thirty r forty years, I think," the old man answered. "I don't know ex actly." "I'll stay, then," decided the stran ger. "He must be nearly done."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Too Realistic. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

Too Realistic. Willie finally persuaded his aunt to play train with him. The chairs were arranged in line, and he issued or ders: "Now you he the engineer and I'll be the conductor. Lend me your watch and get up into your cab." Then he hurried down the platform, time piece in hand. "Pull out, there, you red-headed, pie-faced jay!" he shout ed. "Why, Willie!" his aunt exclaimed ! in amazement. "That's right, chew the rag!" he re torted. '"Pull out! We're five minutes late already." They have had to forbid his playing down by the train terminus.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GIRLS, YOU'RE NOT POLITE. Another Outburst by the Cantankerous Crank. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

GIRLS, YOU'RE NOT POLITE. Another Outburst by the Cantankerous ■ Crank.' Girls, you are doubtless very; charm ing in your low-necked blouses, short skirts, and delicious stockings, yet I would fain point out one or two faults which most of you display—and when it comes to display, my cry is: "Less \ stocking and more thoughtfulness." | Girls, I don't consider your man-; ners are as good as those of your mothers. Mother may wear a petti coat, like they used to in the good old days, and grandma three flannel petti coats, because grandma's petticoats, like misfortunes, never come singly, but both of them are polite. Of course, they may have had good be havior spanked into them, but, never theless, it - is more than skin deep. It is my misfortune to travel a good deal in trains and 'buses. You, girls, flaunting your fatal beauty, haunt me in those dangerous vehicles, and with that inborn chivalry which lurks in every male bosom, I- render you oc casional small services. I open a car ria...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
After Many Days. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

After Many Days. During a frost of last year a lady was unfortunate enough to find" a burst pipe inside the scullery. Stand ing on some steps she tried to stop the flow of water by binding a towel around the pipe and holding it till as sistance was obtained. Fortunately a plumber was passing, and he quickly came to the rescue. "One moment, madam, I'll fetch my tools," he-said. - The poor man, however, slipped on the "treacherous pavement and broke his leg, which stopped his work for many a week. A year later, more severe weather, and another s burst pipe in the same scullery, and the same careful house wife, to save a mess mounts the steps to stop the water as before. The same plumber is engaged to render assistance. He looked at "the woman, and recollection dawned on, him in a stupifying manner. "Oh," he cried, "I couldn't come back before! I broke my leg. Have you been holding all the time? I'm so sorry."

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Children's Meal Hours. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 5 June 1914

The Children's Meal Hours. Children should be taught to foe regular at their meals and to take nothing 'between them. This rule ap plies to infants as well as to older children. The practice of feeding the little on$ every time it cries is a dan gerous one to its weak digestive or gans. An infant's stomach, though it needs food 'at more ferquent inter vals, two to four hours, according to its age, requires the same regularity which is essential to the maintenance of healthy digestion in older persons..

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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