ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Waynesburg Messenger Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
12,833 results
(THE AFPAIB AT BLOOMEBY-GAP. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

(THE AFPAIB AT BLOOMEBY-GAP. CAMP CHASE, VA, Feb. 15, 1862. Messrs. Editors: Although not being a regular correspondent of your paper, I think I may take the liberty of writing you the news. Gen. Lander being informed that a band of rebels was stationed at Bloomery, Hampshire county, Va., determined to have them routed. Brig. Gen. Kimble's brigade was selected to put the expedition through. It consisted of the 13th and 14th Indiana, 84th Pennsylvania, C2d Ohio, and 7th Virginia regiments Infantry, and the 1st Virginia Cavalry. We took rip the Hire of march at 5 o'clock, P. M., on the ISth inst., and at a distance of eight miles we took supper and rested till 3 o'clock next morning. We then resumed our march, and daylight found ue at the scene of action. The rebels being informed of our approach, had abandoned the town, and fled to the woods and mountains and scattered in every direction for the purpose of bushwhacking. At first we thought there was no enemy to contend with. Th...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Singular Disclosure from BiehmoBd—A Confession of Weakness. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

A Singular Disclosure from BiehmoBd—A Confession of Weakness. !*ta a ijrs fag; The rf ew York Post publishes some passages from a significant letter Sst received in New York from ichmond. The Post asserts the letter to be written by a person then arid ritilt g resident at the South, and who has excellent opportunities for khxffrliig the matters whereof he speaks. The letter is dated more than a month ago, and it will be seen that the great events which have since occurred prove the sagacity and trustworthiness of the writer. We quote from this letter as follows :-— . The situation of the Confederacy is not very brilliant jiist now, and I know it from reliable sources that President Davis arid his Cabinet feel anything but easy, notwithstanding all the bragging of Our newspaper—Ttie gbverSrrient here finds it exceedingly difficult to {irabure, money; it wants for War expenses, fbr the first twelve -months, about 8300,000,000.— Of this1 «urii only about 8140,000,001 Have-been ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Troops Poisoned Like Bats--Occnr$aon of Fayetteville, Arkansas. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Troops Poisoned Like Bats--Occnr$aon of Fayetteville, Arkansas. Gen. Halleck has sent'the following dispatch to General McClellan : "Gen. Curtis has taken possession of Fayetteville, Arkansas, capturing a number or * prisoners, stores, baggage, etc. The enemy burnt a part of the town before leaving. They have crossed Boston mountain in great confusion. We are now in possession of all their strongholds.'^ This- is good news enough, but Halleck goes on to say how the high-born and noble-blooded chivalry of the South attempted to destroy their brethren by poison. "Forty-two men and Officers of the Fifth Missouri cavalry were poisoned at Mudtown by eating poisoned food, which the enemy left behind them. The gallant Captain Doubrt died, and Lieut. Von Dental anil Captain Schwan have suffered much, but are recovering. The indignation of our troops is very great, but they have been restrained from retaliating upon the prisoners of war." Another dispatch says: "Our army is waiting f...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Occupation of Uashville-How it was Done—Eehel Stampede. &o. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

The Occupation of Uashville-How it was Done—Eehel Stampede. &o. Latest Cairo specials to Cincinnati papers are as follows : — CLAKKSVIMJ5, Feb. 24, via CAIEO, Feb. 25.— A flag of truce arrived here yesterday from Nashville. The rebels have destroyed all the bridges, pitched their cannon into the river, and evacuated the place. A deputation of prominent citizens asked that private property be respected, and our army take possession. General Mitchell's division was then within nine miles dfrNashville. Gen. Nelson is up the Cumberland, and will arrive at Nashville to-night. Major General Grant is at Clarksville. The rebels are reported concentrating at some point south or southeast of Nashville. Northern and eastern Tennessee are now safe. The weather is delightful for movements, being as warm AS May in Ohio, and the roads are rapidly drying up. [SECOND DISPATCH.] We hold Nashville. The citizens sent down a boat asking the gunboats to go up, and the gunboats have gone. ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Affairs in Tennessee. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Affairs in Tennessee. CHICAGO, February 28.—A special dispatch to tke Tribune frolft Cairo Says: Reports irond Murfreesboro state that Gen. Buelt had surrounded the rebels, at that place, so that none could escape. The rebels offered td surrender their position if allowed to march out with the honors of war. Buell refused, and demanded an unconditional surrender; said he would allow them two days for consideration, and if the place was not silri'endered at the expiration of that iiirie, he would open fire upon them. The time expired this morning. CHICAGO, Feb. 28.—'A special dispatch to the Tribune, from Cairo, says that the rebel army, in its retreat from Nashville, left 1,600 sick and wounded, destroyed the bridges and burned all the steamboats but one, which escaped. The Texas soldiers fired the city in many places, but the citizens extinguished the flames. A great majority of the property owners remained. The excitement was intense. Gov. Harris made a speech, in ] ^^^^^^...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
.».««_ The Work Finished in Tennessee—Andy Johnson Provisional Governor—Columbus Probably Occupied, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

.».««_ The Work Finished in Tennessee—Andy Johnson Provisional Governor—Columbus Probably Occupied, WASHINGTON , March 2d.—Official information to the War Department, from Nashville, represents that the military work in that State is about completed$and that it only remains to effect a civil reorganization of the State government. It is believed that the U.S. forces will occupy Columbus to-day. The rebel forces, under Albert S. Johnston, aro being steadily pressed backward by General Buell. Cotton, to the value of one hundred thousand dollars, ffas fallen into ouf hands at Nashville, and the Treasury Department has taken measures to have. is brought to New Yorfi. The President has designated Hon. Andrew Johnson to be a Brigadier General, and he proceeds to Tennessee to-morrow to open a military provisional government of Tennessee, tfntil the civil government can be reconstructed. Gen. Buell will be nominated to-morrow a Major General of volunteers. The following dispatch was...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Latest From Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Latest From Missouri. SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 4.—A special to the Missouri Republican, from Springfield, Mo., says :—On Wednesday night, Capt. Montgomery, of Wright's battalion, with his company, was surprised at Keitsville, Barry county, [This is in Southwest Missouri, about forty miles from Springfield. — CHRON.] by 800 rebels, supposed to belong to Mc-Bride's division, but who represented themselves as Texan Bangers.— They -fired into a house, occupied by our men, killing two and wounding one. One of the rebels was killed. The balance left, taking with them about Beventy horses. Two wagons loaded with army stores were burned. The same night at Major Harbin's farm, two miles beyond Keitsville, Colonel Ellis and Wright, with an adequate cavalry force, were sent to Keitsville. Gen. Price had burned several public buildings at Fayetteville, Ark., including the Arsenal lead factory, several flouring mills, and 100,000 pounds of flour. Many of the inhabitants along the road hav...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Advance of Gen. Banks' Division—Ohjecltof the Movement. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

The Advance of Gen. Banks' Division—Ohjecltof the Movement. BOLITAB, Md., Feb. 28.—GeneHral Banks' army occupied Harper's Ferry, unopposed on Wednesday, with all the necessaries fbr a permanent occupation. The advance took possession of Bolivar Heights, and yesterday pushed its reconnoissances to Charlestown, captured a few prisoners. Loudon Heights are also occupied, in order to prevent any flank movement by the enemy. To-day Charleston was occupied by a strong force, and will beheld against any attack. The plans- of the commander are not known, but the movement is probably intended to dover the reconstruction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and bridges and may perhaps mean more. A train of cars j>assing between stations was fired at to-day by a rebel battery, but no harm was done. The troops are in excellent condition, and will be protected from inclement weather. No accident oc curred in transporting the troops over the river. The pontoon bridge was a complete s...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Death of General Lander. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Death of General Lander. WASHINGTON, March 2.—Gen. Lander had every attention which his old and well tried friends around him could bestow. His death was somewhat sudden. It was not till five o'clock this afternoon his wife received intelligence of his illness.— She immediately took measures for obtaining a special train to proceed thither, but before the arrangements were completed, Secretary Stanton called in person, and with much feeling and delicacy acquainted her with the fact of her husband's death.— Secretary Chase and other distinguished friends subsequently visited her in her affliction. General Shields succeeds General Lander in command.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
1 »» ¦ Direct from Nashville. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

1 »» ¦ Direct from Nashville. The city is entirely quiet. Even the bitterest Secessionists acknowledge our military authorities treating them cruelly kind. All admit the vast superiority in arms, equipments and appearance of our troops, and say that so far, there has been the most admirable discipline displayed. >

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Shocking Death. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Shocking Death. Mrs. Hannah Warden, of Eichland township, Guernsey county, Ohio, was found recently lying with her face in the fire, and literally burned to death. Her husband, Isaac Warden, Jr., had been away from home all day, working at his father's, and on coming home at night found his wife ly ing with her face in the fire, her head almost burned up. It is thought she must have fainted and fell in . the fire. ACQUITTAL OF COL. ANISANSEL.— We learn, says the Wheeling Intelligencer of Monday, that a dispatch was received in this city yesterday, announcing the acquittal of Colonel Anisatscl) of the First Virginia Cavalry, of the charges preferred against him of cowardice in the face of the enemy. From the best information we can gain we believe that to be reliable. A. court-martial has had the case under consideration fbr some time. J®-Tbe Prince of Wales haB contributed £100, Lord Hastings £400, Lady Hastings £200, and Durham Cathedral £200 to the sufferers by the Hartley...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Evacuation of Columbus—The City Laid in Ashes by the Rebels. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Evacuation of Columbus—The City Laid in Ashes by the Rebels. ST. Louis, March 4.—A special dispatch to the Republican from Cairo, dated the 3d, says that Columbus has been evacuated and burned by the rebels. The gunboat Benton, with General Collum and Commodore Foote, went down the river to-day on a reconnoissance. They found the rebels had fled, having removed their guns and laid the town in ashes. Everything was destroyed that could not be carried away.— The rebels have retreated to Fort Randolph. The whole town of Columbus is nothing but ruins. Tho guns have also been removed from the Island below. BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBJ ¦ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Hi SIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII T ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss B ' BIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlT ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ H ' ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssH ' ' iSSSS...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
More Bebels Captured—Gunboat Engagement in Tennessee. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

More Bebels Captured—Gunboat Engagement in Tennessee. CHICAGO , March 3.—A special dispatch to the Tribune says that a very bright light, of a large conflagration in the direction of Bloodville , was seen from here on Friday night at nine o'clock. On Saturday night the sky was brilliantly illuminated by tho reflection of a large conflagration directly in the line of Columbus, apparently as far distant. Another special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Cairo 2d, says that a gentleman arrived from Charleston, Sfo., brings intelligence of the capture of forty men of Jeff. Thompson's band and four small one-pounder guns near Sikestown. The gunboat Lexington had an engagement a day or two since with a rebel battery at Savannah, Tennessee. The Nieholl's House, at Bloomington, was destroyed by fire last night. Loss 835,000,- insured for $20,000.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Very Important from the South-Martial Law in Eichmond-The Escape of the lashville, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Very Important from the South-Martial Law in Eichmond-The Escape of the lashville, Martial law has been proclaimed in Richmond and Norfolk by President Jeff. Davis, and the distillation of intoxicating, liquors and Union sentiments positively prohibited. The rebel steam sloop of war Nashville has arrived at Wilmington, North Carolina, having run the blockade at Beaufort, North Carolina. Captain Pegram arrived in Richmond yesterday, and states that he hoisted the United States colors as soon as he saw the North Corlina coast, and ran up within a mile of the Federal blockading vessels. As soon as he got by them he hoisted the Confederate flag at the main mizzen and foro, and ran in under the guns of Fort Macon, hotly pursued by a Federal steamer, supposed to be the Monticillo, which vessel fired thirty shots , doing but little injury to the Nashville. The Nashville brought important dispatches and a valuable assorted cargo from England, including ten thousand reams of bank-note ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Bebel Cavalry Bested—The Captures on the Upper Potomac. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Bebel Cavalry Bested—The Captures on the Upper Potomac. CHAS.LEOT6WN , V A, March 6.—Last night a squadron of the First Michigan Cavalry advanced as far as Perryville, on the Winchester turnpike, and ambushed, and surprised a party of rebel cavalry, putting three of them hors du combat and routing them. The Michigan party returned with nine cavalry horses fully equipped as trophies, among them the celebrated black stallion rode by. Col. Ash by. Not a man was lost. The amount of forage and provisions captured by our right wing since its advance into Virginia is estimated to be worth twenty thousand dollars. This includes four thousand pounds of bacon stored fbr the use of the rebel army at Leetown and Lovettsville, now held by the Union army. The success of the movement on the Upper Potomac has been complete. Gen. Shields passed through Charlestown on his way West last night.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Gen. Banks' Division Near Charlestown. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

Gen. Banks' Division Near Charlestown. CHARLESTOWN , Va., March 2.—Gen. Banks' division rests in the vicinity of Charlestown. No disaster or accident has occurred since its concentration and departure from Sandy Hook to cause any anxiety to friends at home. Three inches of s»ow fell to-day. The hitherto rancorous secessionists now pay marked respect to the United States uniform. The citizens wbo h ad been compelled to succumb to the rebel force, are elated with the prospects of the future. It is gratifying to perceive that the country throughout which the army passed, bears marks of the usual agricultural industry. It is apparent that the future cereal crops of this prolific grain have not been neglected, as might be supposed. The town and country are destitute of important articles of consumption. There is no lack of break, meat and ooarse clothes. Hundreds of contrabands are hour ly seeking refuge within our lines, but they are allowed to roam at large without care; in fac...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
"THE CRISIS." [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

"THE CRISIS." This is the title of a Democratic weekly journal published at Columbus, Ohio, by SAM. MEDARY, with whom our earliest recolections of newspapers and politics are associated. The "Statesman" of 1840, under the control of Gov. Medary, was one of the ablest and most efficient organs of the party West of the mountains, and had a wide circulation and popularity. Few men write with more force than Medary, and no one is more independent and fearless in the expression of his opinions.— Twenty years have neither abated his zeal in the Democratic cause, nor impaired the vigor of his intellect, and we hope he may serve the party even better for a coming decade or two than he did when his vears were fewer and his blood hotter.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
THE BEBELLION. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

THE BEBELLION. However it may have been with others, we have never had a doubt of the eventual suppression of the Southern rebellion, and of the ability of the Federal Government to recover and maintain its authority.— Our conviction, from the inception of the war, baa been that the Southern people could not command the means to prosecute the struggle with any degree of energy and success, or for any considerable length of time. With their ports diligently blockaded, with no market for their cotton, sugar, rice, tobacco, &c, and without the ability to borrow a dollar from foreign capitalists, it was evident to us that they would soon be in a most embarrassing and harassing want of "thesinews." Their wealth as a section and a people has consisted rather in plantations and slaves than bullion, and such property was not to be easily or generally converted into gold and silver. Under these circumstances, we could not see the shadow of a chance for the "Jeff. Davis" governm...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
DECLINES THE PBESIDENCY. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

DECLINES THE PBESIDENCY. Hon. W«. II. SEWARD has written a letter to a political association in Philadelphia bearing his name and organized for the purpose of urging his claims to the next Presidency, in which he very emphatically declines being a candidate. This, Mr. SEWARD can very safely do. Although one of the ablest men in the ranks of the Opposition, and sincerely attached, as we doubt not, to his country and her institutions, Mr. SEWARD belongs to a class of politicians who have "had their day," and he is just as likely to be "struck by lightning" as elected to the Presidency. The rule of politicians and parties of narrow views and sectional aims is at an end in this Republic. Henceforth the destinies and policy of the country will be committed to the .hands of men of broader patriotism and radically different political theories and convictions from the extremists, South' and North, who brought upon us the present deplorable civil war.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
BEOOBD YOUB DEEDS, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 12 March 1862

BEOOBD YOUB DEEDS, We again urge on persons interested the importance of having their deeds recorded. It will cost but little, and is the only safeguard against fraudulent conveyances.— If you want to avoid trouble, attend to this matter.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
x
Loading...
x
x