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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. m i68 13. 2C X, Beneath Askandaga's Pines, $C 2 m FORRTMOnriMT Tho Qon f KrA nnw r1w1t X among men, and walked and talked with them. .But as that time tell back into the past, many, even of His chosen followers, grew cold. Men's intellects had expanded; their world had devel oped, their cities prospered, but their hearts had lost the old fervor. Then once more ah, wonderful condescension of the Divinity! the Redeemer, hurt by the in gratitude of His creatures', appeared on earth, and through the humble nun of Paray-le-Monial asked mankind yet again to consider the Heart that could "no longer restrain the flames of its charity." The Sacred Heart of Christ, once pleading on the cross, stooped again from the altar to reach our hearts. Christ, the desire of the everlasting hills He, without whom was made nothing that was made, must needs plead for the one thing mankind can withhold from Him, our heart's homage. Is this not enough to move any man to win other men to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 169 Askandaga is an Indian mission in the West in a quiet, green place among the hills, where the summer mists drift slowly up, and daily disclose a forest-sanctuary, fresh and wild and sweet, with an air of unearthly peace about it. There are many stories about the old mission-place, but of them all this one most closely touches the members of our League. One June day, some years ago, Jean de Valorsay, a Pa risian aristocrat, found himself unexpectedly stranded in As-, kandaga. He was virtually stranded, because Benedikt, the Indian guide he deemed unequalled, could not continue their voyaging now, and de Valorsay would not go without him. For Benedikt could read Jean's moods as a woman might; he knew when to talk and when to keep silence delightful qualites in a canoeing companion; the rifle and paddle were vassals to his keen eye and sinewy arms, and his manner was that of a genleman: certainly Jean could not resume his tour without Benedikt. While still a da...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

170 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. had brought to perfection. To de Valorsay, who would have planned with exquisite care a feast to celebrate the eve of the world's last day, this falling-off in his own smart coterie was in tolerable. He decided to leave Paris, until they should re gain some of their former brilliance, and while casting about in his mind for some retreat, old memories had recurred to him so constantly that he decided upon Canada. So, with hasty adieux, as though for a week's stay out at Chateau Val orsay, he left Paris for the West. There, canoeing and tramping, with Benedikt for com pany, the strengthening life of the wilderness made a new man of him. Wreaths of rising mist at dawn had occult powers to wash away the aftertaste of a sybarite's life. The great white face of the moon, peering through the pines at night, and remote mountain-peaks had a language of their own that Jean soon learned to interpret. And after a day's hard paddling, when the evening meal was over, he c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 171 ceptibilities were taxed to endure life among the Hurons. He could see the smoky, crowded wigwams, the noisy feasts and the unappetizing sagamite that was given Father Natal for food; and he knew that his war-panoplied ancestors in the crusades, had not won more glorious victories than this worn out missionary, to whom the crown of complete martydom finally came. Not all the materialism of the military school nor the luxuries of his life in Paris could quite blot out from the man's mind the memory of the boy's inner life. And be cause of it, the forest life had a potent influence over him. II. On the evening of his fourth day in Askandaga, Jean was returning from a visit to Benedikt, when he met Father Cham el going toward the lake to visit a sick boy. To Jean who had known Father Chamel's relatives in distinguished circles in France, this busied and happy old missionary was a con tinual wonder and revelation. On his invitation now, Jean willingly turned to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

172 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. possible. The small room was clean and bright, the cotton curtains at the window, hung in straight folds, white as snow drifts, and on the white washed log-wall opposite the couch, was a picture of the Sacred Heart. On the young man's face lay the story of another consumptive. As they came along, Jean had learned from the priest, of the kindness of the Wabunosas, who had taken Pierre into their home during his last illness. They were an elderly couple, who made a comfortable livelihood by fishing and gardening, and whose home was larger and more airy than any owned by Pierre's relatives. Their food was more plent iful too and of better quality, and knowing these things they took him in. "Then I can trust Mrs. Wabunosa to take precautions against the desease being communicated to others," Father Chamel said. "She is a very intelligent woman and a good woman who feels herself called to do many good works, be cause she is a (i) zelatrice. But she is not alone i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 173 Indians' affection and sympathy was so real and apparent, and Pierre's pleasure in their company was so marked, even as his greeting to the priest had been. With Pierre's uncle leading them, the score of men and women assembled sang a hymn in French, then responded as Father Chamel recited the beads, and sang more hymns in melodious Ojibway; all the while the solemn people delicately oblivious of the stran ger's presence, their absorbed missionary and Pierre's bliss fully calm face, were fascinating objects of study to the man looking on. As they walked back to the mission-house Father Cham el's thoughts and speech turned to Pierre and his earnest life of work for a widowed mother, then to the part Pierre and his picture of the Sacred Heart were taking in the lives of young men who had been his intimate friends. "He asked them," said the priest, "to come, one by one, and talk to him in the evenings when their work was done, and Mrs. Wabunosa says as each you...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

174 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. years, as clearly as a page of his familiar breviary, asked him gravely: "M. de Valorsay, are you not living in a world that is peopled by many hundreds of millions with every creature in the whole struggling mass dependent upon some others? Together these people are striving, hating, loving, praying. There is much virtue and happiness in our world, but there is still murder, and rapine, and lust, while there are parents whose little ones ask in vain for bread. Tell me, is there not some active good and serious evil to be found with little seek ing in such a world?" Then he talked with gentle persuasiveness of the social, political and religious duties of a man surely a wearisome subject Jean would have said a year before. But now it only brought fascinating, thought-provoking, and stirring new ideas; he felt the mind and soul within him stimulated; he began to see the opportunities he had foregone. When the brother rang the bell for community-prayer, Father...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

I THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 175 tie scrutiny, left the grassy road and wandered into a pinery, where the dark branches shut in a twilight. Somewhere among the pines a child was singing, and the young voice rose in ripples nature had taught, sweet and penetrating as the song of a bird that swayed to its own mel ody upon a bough near him. The chorus came distinctively: "Sauvez notre patrie, par votre Sacre Cceur; Sauvez notre patrie, par votre Sacre Cceur." The words and the strangely appearing air thrilled him as he walked on to find the singer. He passed noiselessly over' the pine-needles and the voice led him to her. She sat upon a knoll covered with violets and Spring beauty, a tiny, white-robed figure with a pair of small, dark hands, heaping blossoms upon the basket by her side. The child turned a startled face toward the stranger and sank back into her mossy seat. Her round, dark eyes widened in mag nificent beauty; the song died trembling on her baby-mouth. "Will you tell me, ma pe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

tp'wwz'rpQFj'x - 176 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Did God direct his steps to the pinery that morning, he asked himself, to reveal to him his own needs, with the sweet voice of an Indian child asking Divine mercy upon F ranee? He stood motionless for a moment to collect his thoughts; then out of the abundance of his emotions words came: "O God! has it come to this, that the people to whom France gave the Faith should have now to intercede for my Father land? That the people for whom Natal Chabanel died should be secure in the faith of a God's care while Jean Chabanel, of his own race, has been without faith in God or goodness? "Ah, little one! our Father Himself has spoken to me through your innocent lips." Jean walked hurriedly forward, careless of the direction he took. What was time or place to a man who suddenly felt himself brought out of a desert of gilded want to the re freshing sense of God's companionship? "Ah, Heaven! what bliss? I cannot compass it with my poor mind," he cried in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 177 as he came slowly up between the lines of kneeling worship pers, bearing reverently, under the canopy, the pure Host, the Holy of Holies. He reached the altar-steps, and child ren's trembling hands threw sweet blossoms under his feet privileged blossoms that gave out their life and sweetness to welcome God and beautify His resting-place. The woodland then echoed ancient Benediction hymns, and the priest, for the moment more privileged than the an gels in Heaven, raised aloft the Body of Christ, who blessed the warm, wayward hearts of His forest children bowed in worship. A "Salve!" of musketry rolled out in recognition of the King of kings, who did not heed that the muskets were old and the men shabbily clad. A large bell was rung, the peo ple rose and the procession re-formed, while the church-bell was pealing, always pealing, and the soft winds played with the singers' voices. This time Jean Chabanel de Valorsay took his place in line with the humblest of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

178 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ' SISTER ST. CLARE, A Mother's Story, It was in 1870. In a prison cell, dimly lighted by a slant ing sun-ray, a young soldier was seated on his bed of straw. That soldier was my son. His hands were bound and his feet tied with a rope. His head was bowed upon his breast, and his whole form was motionless as death. His thoughts, however, were living, and the memories which came back to him were very clear. In fancy he saw himself reading still the letter which had brought him the news that his mother was very ill and desired to see him before she died. But to go and kneel at her bedside and receive her parting blessing he must have leave of absence, and this the general was not willing to grant. The Prussian soldiers had invaded France, and it was necessary that all should remain where they were, underarms: In the mental struggle which ensued filial love overcame" obedience to military discipline; the young soldier deserted in order to see his mother before sh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 179 At that moment my son understood why poets sometimes compare women with the angels. Next morning, at the hour when the prison gates were opened, Sister Clare was waiting outside for the departure of the condemned man. She wished to accompany him to the place of execution, in order that, up to the last moment, a friendly voice should fall upon his ear. The platoon of sol diers were ready; they formed a square, and the prisoner was placed in the center. The sentence ordered that his epaulets should be torn off, to kill him morally before he was shot. Suddenly a soldier appeared on horseback, riding up quickly, with a folded paper in his hand. "Where is Sister Clare?" he asked. And turning to her, he said: "This is for you, from the general." With tremb ling hands she broke the seal. The young soldier was not to die. And while the courier disappeared in the morning haze, Sister St. Clare herself loosed the prisoner's bonds. My son has two daughters. To one he h...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. B m i8o m. A) The Maxim of the Sacred Heart 3 Not my will, but Thine be donci Luke xxii, 42 X M WTTnTJTTTM ATT7T V fViJe nnWo rlmiico nf tha Viorn- I ic heart of Jesus finds no echo in the overwhelm ing majority of human hearts. For, if it did, the Sacred Heart on its heavenly throne would hear no more the endless murmurings and lamentations of discontent re-echoing all over. This earth of ours would witness no longer such dreadful scenes of sin, sadness and despair. It is an undeniable fact that, in this valley of tears, there exists an endless variety of evils, as sailing poor humanity on all sides and endeavoring to embit ter our very existence. At one time it is a devastating war that destroys broadcast the fruits of generations of ingenuity and toil. Another time some domestic enemy poisons the source of blessings, the peace of our home. Now it is, as if the heavens were transformed into a huge mass of steel, whilst the crops, upon which we rely for progres...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 181 Today we are the victim of an outrage, tomorrow of oppres sion. In fact, who will ever be able to give an account of all the tribulations, afflictions, calamities, adversities or miseries we are subject to at any period of our lives? Still, on the other hand, it is not a hairbreadth less cer tain, we possess in the Maxim of the Sacred Heart a safe and universal remedy against all imaginable ills a source of virtue, a bulwark of inexhaustible strength. For if we, too, make it a point, to unite our wills fully unto God, then our frame-work may tremble and shake, but our souls, instead of being impaired, shall become perfectly independent from anything in the universe but God. Whence, dear Maxim of the Sacred Heart: "Not my will, but Thine be done!" be henceforth indellibly stamped alike upon our hearts and our minds. "Not my will, but Thine be done," shall flow ceaselessly from our lips, shall in any misfortune be the first expression in sorrow or pain. For th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

,..., J.l(V'i---yljwti,ijliPMij,4yBIIJI. y 182 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "JOHNNIE ON THE SPOT." Chickasaw Indian Baby Was Clearly Entitled to the Above Cognomen. Attorney Ben White, of Macon, Mo., relates an incident which illustrates the North American Indian's rapid assimila tion of American humor: The allotment rolls for the Chicksaws were closed at midnight, September 24th," he says. "Children born after that hour were cut out, but up to midnight every male mem ber of the tribe was entitled to 320 acres of land, worth now about $1,000, but which promises soon to be worth many times that amount. The evening of the 24th was an anxious one for the Indian family dwelling not far from the registry office. An interesting event was anticipated. The watchers' eyes were fixed on the clock as the hands slowly but with grim certainty crawled around to the midnight hour. At ex actly 11:40 a brand-new Chickasaw of the male persuasion came into this sinful world. The twenty minutes was worth $1,00...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

EDITORIAL. 183 THE INDIAN aBvOCATeI I 4 H Published by the Benedictine Fathers of It . t f II SAORBD HEART MISSION, OICLAHOMA. 1 A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION! Single Copies 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PRIVILEGESl i. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate in all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sung eery First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living and one for the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

184 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. asses; for what is loud and senseless talking, huffing and swearing, other than a more fashionable way of braying? ft When the Spaniards first went to Yucatan, the Indians could not understand them, and kept replying to their many questions, "Yuca-tan?" meaning "What do you say?" Thus, this name came to be applied to the country. Mr. J. B. Benedict, United States Supervisor of In dian schools for the Indian Territory, says: "My experi ence among the Indians has taught me that the Indian pos sesses the same mental qualities and the same mental capac ity as the white man. Give the Indian boy an equal chance with the white boy, and the Indian youth will not be dis tanced in the race for success." tt The Rev. Isidore Ricklin, O. S. B., is zealously canvass ing the schools and religious institutions of the Diocese of Rochester in the interest of the Preservation Society. Father Isidore has labored successfully for many years among the wildest of the Oklahoma trib...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

EDITORIAL. 185 God does no patch work; whatever He does is done well. tt A good home is not made by a grand house. tt The bee rest on natural flowers, never on painted ones,, however inimitably the color may be laid on; apply this to all things. ft The mother that intrusts her children to the care of ser vants will, later, have such children intrust her to the care of the poor house. tt There are a great many fools in the world; he who would avoid seeing one must lock himself up alone, and break his looking glass. tt The actual doings in France, though not all persons re alize it, constitute a more momentous episode than the bar barities of Turkish soldiers in Albania, or the prospect of war in the Balkans. The future will prove the above assertion. tt Mr. Charles F. Lummis, a non-Catholic, whose exten sive sojourning in Spain and Mexico have resulted in some interesting works of travel, says in referring to the numerous works of philanthropy established by Spain in her American col...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. R i86 A T FPFNn I ow ,s Satanic Majesty Became the Patron of I Dancers and Dancing Halls, T was a good while ago when the Devil resolved to visit the earth in order to find an abode where he could rest and feel somewhat at ease. So he went out in search of a place where he might be hold nothing but wickedness without the slightest intermingling of piety. To that effect he intruded himself into the palace of a prince, because he had r 2b w neard so mucn about tnat species or people tnat mmmJ he did not doubt in the least but he would find just what he wanted. And from the way things looked, he seemed to have guessed the right thing. He was confronted on all sides with idleness, sensuality and pride. The principal occupations were gambling, rambling, feasting and drinking, flirting, love making and the like. From morn to night it was some show or other, partly comedy, partly tragedy, or something of both. The thoughts and conversa tions dwelt upon pleasures, sensu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 June 1903

H'MPPgpgywtra y-Ti" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 187 The prince, giving way to his better instincts, took hold of a broom and swept the rascals out of his court. And the Dev il, being thoroughly disgusted thereat, left with them. Thence he set his face towards a large city not far dis tant. From his brother devils he had heard glowing reports of the glorious ways people lived there. He sped on, eager to be retrieved for the mistake he had made. No sooner had he entered one of the principal streets than he beheld a scene that seemed to justify the judgment he had formed. It was certainly a big show of covetousness, luxury, sensnality and pride exhibited with such low, ridiculous frivolity, as to suggest a widespread tinge of insanity of some sort or other. Some gents were hopping on their spring-heeled shoes as if by every step their tender feet came in contact with tacks. And when his burly eyes wandered over to some of the younger dames and damsels, he could not help but feel highly please...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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