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Title: Day Book, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 66,432 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

fe"3b!WS N -r ' 4 4 $ j - - - ?' BATTLE OF WITS KEEN BETWEEN MINOR LEAGUE , OWNERS AND SCOUTS By Billy Evans. . -3 The scout has played a leading part in baseball's progress. Ten -years ago the scout was almost unknown. Today the Sherlock Holmes of the diamond plays a prominent rdle in a pennant winning club. Much of the success of a team depends on the ability of' the scout or scouts. r f " - To the uninitiated, the position of baseball scout is- alluring. It is the duty of the scout to travel from coast to coast during the sum mer months, with nothing to do save take in games. He gets a fat salary arid his expenses. - Should he discover a youngster who sud denly develops into a star, it is almost certain the club owner In question will give him a bonus. Like all other positions which re quire much traveling, the jo"b is not as easy as it looks - Many present-day stars were picked up in the rough bythe scouts, and molded into the great players they are' now. Many a good sto'ry is r...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

wy ?V-7 z.i ,-. -.- , - . ..v - r ' y'OlUE'ERQCK OF ALL-OVER EMBROIDERY ' j, . .4 ' :frt m lllllfe if All-over- embroidery, fashions as easily as -it doesprettily into a little girl's "Sunday, best." This white lingerie frock is'made with' a long waist, -necessitating a sashr and two scant fills' in the skirt. The-sleevs are .short ruffled ones and about thcshoultlers is a deep, full flounce. ' j--Ate'Jr. r4n . iS?a

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmm wmmmmmmmm M CYNTHIA GREY'S DAILY CORRESPONDENCE Is it not dishonorable for two women to be in love with each other? This is the case: A girl who has always counseled with her mother and was always kind and loving has changed utterly because of her love for a married woman. This woman has so much influence over the girl that when the mother tried to break up th"e friendship, it was all to no avail. The mother's tears did not affect the girl in the least. Is the daughter or the mother wrong? X. X. X. A. If the married woman is a suitable companion and a woman of good character there is no rea son why. the association should be broken up. Girls frequently have such friendships, and they often result i,n good. It never means that they love the mother less, but that they are looking for some thing in friendship that mothers seldom supply namely pure com radeship. WheH the mother ob- jects, it can mean nothing but selfishness on her part, unless the girl's associate is a woman ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

fellow arlonej' Bright Eyes; I am sure you think so your self; else you would not put the question as you do And I ber Ueve, if you are honest with your self, you will acknowledge that your feeling- toward this other man is merely an accidental fas cination, which you can conquer if you will ; and that, deep down in your heart, you do care for the husband whom you loved enough to marrv. -o o- REAL SPORT LEADERS X'V'' J v "SHy Mel Sheppard, Middle Distance Champion. o o "Faint heart never won fair lady." Alas, alas, how seldom we have our fainting spells in time. WHAT IS IT? By Berton Braley. Life's a jest, a jape, a whimsey, Life's an article that's flimsy, Life's a game and life's battle, Life's as foolist as a rattle, Life's a' song of love and laughter, With a sob that follows after, Life's a fire we didn't kindle, Life's a hunibug and a swindle, It's a weariness a glory. It's a queer uncanny story. Life is simple and a wonder, It's a dream, a fact, a blunder; It is like a patchw...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

STEEL TRUST ANNOUNCES ITS "PROFIT-SHARING' PLAN; CONDITIONS IN ITS MILLS EXPOSED Morgan "Permits" Employes He Works 12 Hours a Day for 7 Days a Week, With 24-Hour Shift Every Two Weeks, to Buy His Watered Stock. Below are two illuminating telegram from New York. One is from an announcement made by the publicity department of the 'United States Steel Cor poration, and tells how that be nificent trust "shares its profits" with its employes. The other consists in an inter view with John A. Fitch, one of the editors of Survey, in which he tells of the actual conditions un der which the employes of the Steel Trust are permitted to earn their daily bread. Taken together they are highly interesting, and so illuminating that no comment is required. New York, Jan. 9 The United States Steel Corporation last night officially gave out the terms under which its employes will be permitted to benefit by the company's profit-sharing plan. Preferred stock is offered to employes at 110 a share; commo...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

mi gprs ,ws r'igs: wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Fitch, one of the editors o "the Survey, confirms the charges re cently made by Dr. Felix Adler that the United States Steel Cor poration works its men 12 hours a day with a 24-hour stretch ev ery two weeks, . "The 12-hour day is the rule in the mills- with the 'workers en gaged in the manufacturing pro cesses," says Fitch. "Some of the men have jobs that do not re quire constant effort. Others have to work the 12 hours straight at the hardest kind of manual labor. I do not know how they stand it; but perhaps the explanation is that the men mostly are Poles and Hungarians of almost superhuman strength. "There are men in the mills who work -only 10 hours a day, but they are the mechanics about the plant and not the steel work ers. "Every two weeks when the shifts are changed from day to night, the men are forced to work a 24-hour stretch instead of the usual 12-hour one. Many of the men are also forced to work sev en days iri1 the week. "Any e...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

wmmmmmmmmmma fmjqpllQt'Wil District Attorney Pelletier read the confession, and asked for the death penalty, declaring that evi dence that state would have pro duced at the trial would have warranted it. t Judge Sandersdn askeH the minister if he had entered his plea after consideration of the conse quences. "I have," he answered, in firm tones. Richeson said, in response to questions, that the plea was voluntarily made. Judge Sande'rs6n, after reading the law jn the case, then sentenc ed Richeson to die in the electric chair during the week of May 19. Throughout his appearance in court, Richeson paid little atten tion to the crowd in the court room. His "face was pale and drawn, and he walked with diffi culty. -o o CHINE&E GIRL LEADER I BLUE BEGINNING Houston Citizen's Alliance be gan the new year by calling on the authorities to suppress the Harriman strikers, "for restora tion of law and order" This would turn the Southern Pacific thug strikebreakers loose on the community. I...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

UWWW'HimyAUj, ifct WHAT HAPPENED OUTSIDE CHICAGO Sarah Furst, Brooklyn board ing house keeper, held Mrs.' Wm. H. Griffin as hostage because Griffin didn't pay his board. Wil liam had to go to court to res cue his wife. F. W. Woolworth, the five-cent king, said to be financing pro posed chain of 5 and 10 cent cigar stores Mrs. Catherine Monihan has sued City of N. Y. for $25,000 charging that her husband was beaten to death by orderlies at Bellevue hospital. Track hand unloading , car of cinders at Westbrooksville, N. Y., found head, one arm and part of body of man buried under hot cinders. Car was loaded at round- house of Ontario & Western, at Middletown, N. Y., Jan. 4. "I would rather be mayor of ,N. Y. than president of the U. S." Mayor Gaynor, when asked if he was candidate for Democratic nomination. y The other way of saying this is: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. I. C. depot, Orangeville, 111., burned yesterday with 3 sacks of mail and all freight and baggage...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

; u'MWqMWPPfiP1 HBMa VtKfk'JUB-dC 1 charge of wife deserticJn. Said he'd just gone out for walk. Case dismissed. Mrs. Bessie Lisbon, Pittsburgh, testifying in divorce suit, 'said , uusuaHU Wdiiigu iu atn tucn uauj f to j.tanan count ior qou,uuw. What'd the I. C. want with the baby, anyhow? Fred W. Kline, St Louis, in cross bill to wife's divorce suit accuses her of infatutation. for three ball players. Three! Ma gee, Bliss and Knight, first two are Cardinals. The Examiners informs its readers this morning that "His hands cold and clammy . . .- .Dr. Harry Elgin Webster denied any knowledge'of the murder. . . " Evidently written by a "lady reporter," who "played hands" with the doctor. BEAUTY INDEED! The maiden asked: "Can you make me beautiful?" "For $5," said the witch, "I carTmake you so beautiful that all men will turn to stare at you as you pass." i The maiden smiled disdainful ly. Her experience had taught her this was not such an easy matter. "For $10," said the Witch, "I can m...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

OVMVMJBiaHM jflwte. zxf'rZS'for'twa-iir:? wvpepytCT rU COLD WAVE LIIGSRS SUFFERING INTENSE After a brief respite yesterday from zero weather, the thermom eter dropped again last night and renewed the suffering and mis ery among the poor. At 1 a. m. the mercury registered 3 below, and at noon today it was -. The weather bureau says 8 "below will be reached tonight, and no pros pect of wanner weather is in sight: The same story came from sur ( rounding cities, comparatively warm weather of yesterday being supplanted by bitter cold. Rail road trains, which were catching up to their schedules, are again running late. The death of one woman, the serious injuries of several people, and the thrilling rescue of' three men from an ice floe in the Lake off Delaware place marked the re turn of zero temperature here. Hundreds of cases of frostbitten Wrs, hands and feet were attend ed to by private physicians, of vyhich no report was made. Mrs. Catherine Hays, 75, 519 W. 45th place, was the late...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

the police in response to an an bnymous message, called at her home. The children said they had not eaten since Saturday night. The mother was too ill to speak rationally. With the baby, she was taken to the county hos pital, and her condition is said to lie critical. The children were cared tor by a volunteer juvenile officer. The only ray of hope for the unemployed and destitute was the prospect of a job for the men cutting ice. The ice fields this, morning were , swarming with men, and the city's employment agencies are searching for more to send to them. SHERIFF ELECTED TO TWO JOBS ONE IN THE PEN AT LABOR OTHER AS COUNTY COMMISSIONER Greensburg, Pa., Jan. 9. Sheriff John E. Shields of West moreland County, stands elected to two jobs one at hard labor in the penitentiary, the other a place 'as county commissioner on a fat public salary. The penitentiary sentence is for two years and four months. Two juries decided he deserved it. The county job is for four years. An overwhelming ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 9 January 1912

V0t Second Shtelds -allowed men, 'duly committed to'"jail by a legal ly empowered .magistrate, to walk away fnoih'thV prison.. He admits it, but niaintain's ,rtKat he was right mora'llyVjThe men released were Shieldsown! deputies. During" (he. tifiie.Yhe.f coal com panies 1 were"doing 'their own property.'guardjijgj-'odf Shields' Sheriff John E. Shields. deputies went to the property of the Penn Gas & Coal Co., ostens ibly to arrest three men for dis charging firearms. The deputies were promptly arrested by com pany guards ,for "trespassing. These company.guandswere dep utized constables ahdrwere called Coal & Iron police. The'sheriffs' deputies were sen tenced 'in a justice "court to 10 days in jaD each. When they were taken 'to ihe jail, Shields said: 'iMen,- go back to your 'obs." They' went and Sheriff Shields wfe ehteficed'td 4hHh one.y.eart arid onemooth .because of ft ' He,s&ys his' deputies were needetf.to maintain order. 4 .Following his conviction, Shields secu...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

THE DAY BOOK P. &398 'TEL. MONROE 353- 500 SO. PEORIA ST. Vol. J, No. 90 Chicago, Wednesday, Jap. 10, 1912 One Cent ILLINOIS CENTRAL FIRfiMEN THREATEN TO JOIN SHOPMEN ON STRIKE Claim Road Is Mistreating MenMcCbmb City., Miss. Center of Shopmen's Strike, Placed Under Martial LawKeport No Union Men Returning to Work. Dissatisfaction among the fire men ' on the Illinois Central rail road threatens to further embar rass- the railway, already said' to be m difficulty because of the al leged demoralized condition of its rolling s'tock and motive power as- "a result of the shopmen's strike. According to information in the hands of W. F. Kramer, gen eral secretary qf the Black smith's union, when engines from the Burnside shops become ''dead," the present custom is to remove the crew and place the engineer on another engine as .firemen; In this way two fire men are eliminated, instead of laying off the crew of the dead engine. Reports of similar conditions are comirigin to strike headqu...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

-mmBPWWJ' LimmwwMmgmwwMy mummn' ing them with violating the Pure Food Laws. There's $1,500,000,000 or so worth of securities in ruins of Equitable Life Building and left ears of every crook in N. Y. are burning today. Lorimer says that if Speaker Shurtleff had not brought down the,gavel when he did at the jackpot election, he (Lorimer) would have had 150 votes instead of a paltry 108. What did Shurtleff care? There was a majority. He'd earned his $100 bills. , Lawrence F. Abbot, presently proxy-in-chief for Teddy Roose velt, says that all stories about what Roosevelt said at the Aldine Club dinner, last night are abso lutely without foundation. And, furthermore, they are fabrications, and fibs, and lies. Lawrence has been rpund the Qutlook so much lately he's get ting the habit. Conductor Geo. Cupid Eise, held up Great Northern train at Rugby, N. D., for half hour while Axel P. Carlson of Sturgis, N. D., became hubby of Janette IC Ros enquist, of Topeka, Kan. Peter Bros, wealthy ran...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

Ii-m-iHi ii -mi ii ii- TT-ika-li- . Mum MiniWnMMl unWMWUniWi ;aT7W""fFHSrf:TY ?v- families. x Health Commissioner Young today scored the street railways and "L" roads for sending, out cold cars, and hinted at a strong- -o- er car-heating ordinance if the present one was knocked out in the courts by the companies. He said 118 violations of the law had been reported. o- WHAT HAPPENED OUTSIDE CHICAGO Equitable Life Assurance So ciety, being on the inside of the business itself, did not carry one cent df insurance on its building. "Life is like a cup of tea, the su gar, all at the bottom of the cup." Julia Ward Howe, trying to prove that old age is best time oi life. Nevertheless, no cup of tea is worth anything unless you keep the sugar fairly well stirred up. Hiram Davies son of Chief of Police of Pottsville, Pa., blew out his brains after a quarrel with his folks, who objected to his paying attention to a young girl. Melvin'W. Orr, formerly cash ier of the Sfate bank of Manisti que, ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

ppr f. MwMMSjpjiuaiymt'iw - court today to 15 months impri sonment for stealing King George's watch from vestry of royal chapel. Admitted guilt, but said he was "bloomin' drunk." Burglars entered home of T. P. Jones, vice president of Pittsburgh-Buffalo Coal company, at Pittsburgh, chloroformed Mrs. Jones, and ransacked house. Supreme Court has decided government revenue officers have right to break in doors to en force laws regulating sale of oleo margine. Vatican rumor says Pope Pius will appoint Mgr. Averas, papal ttunzio to Brazil, as apostolic del egate to Washington. Democratic National Commit tee has adopted identical presi dential primary resolution so en thusiastically rejected by Repub licans. Bryan cannot sleep N because there are thorns in his bed, he says. Names of thorns : Harmon, Wilson, and one called Willie by fi.is parents who didn't know what Tie was going to growup into. "I did not!" "I did not!" "I did not !" Lorimer testifying before senate investigating commit...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

twi&!WQ&HW ? tf-. tion-has asked Congress for $80, 000 to fight chestnut tree blight Memories of boyhood days, save the chestnut crop ! Chance of being killed on pas--senger steamships one in a mil lion according to Steamboat In spection Bureau report. . J. D. McCarthy pays $3 aear for title of Director of Services of Uubana, O; Mayor Green, his brother-in-law, appointed him. J. D. paid $15 for surety bond. Then? council, which doesn't like the way J. D. cuts his hair, reduced his salary to $12 a. year. Board of Tax Review, Cleve land, reads society columns of newspapers. Now it has cited Alice Hinds, debutante, to ex plain why $50,000 rope of pearls was not listed for taxation. Cowboys arrived in Galveston,' Tex., today with wild story of fight with pack of 1,000 famished wolvesbn range in Lloyd .county. It's always been snakes with us. New Haven, Conn., Associa tion of Congressional Ministers has agreed to fire any member of association who performs mar miage ceremony wher...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

rr "' f V i--V H'wmmwmmmnm ,0". C. Wilson, labor leaders, charged with conspiracy to dam age property during buttonwork ers' strike, have asked change of venue from Muscatine county, la. Lorimer's still denying things. Speeches by Mayor Harrison and others to embalmed in phon ograph record for corruption of Chicagoans of 4000 A. D. or jthereabouts. Why expose the present gen eration to the scorn of those to come? Minneapolis has invited "guests" of municipal lodging house to participate in daily so cial event in neighboring wood-yard. ENGLAND ON THE VERGE .OF LABOR CRISIS London, Jan. 10. England is today on the verge of the great est labor crisis in her history. Re ports from the mining district de clare the men are voting almost unanimously in favor of the es tablishment of minimum wage. It is the general opinion that there is no chance of averting a strike as the operators have serv ed notice that they will not con sider the minimum wage demand. There is not enough coal in Englan...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

R5 twSBSB mvtmnfp '- v11 &m"&F'mvr WALLS OF EQUITABLE LIFE BUILDING THREATEN AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK BUILDING Bulletin. New York., Jan. 10. Under orders from Chief Kenlon police at 2:10 began clearing the Ameri can Exchange National Bank building, at 128 Broadway, of all tenants. The great bank itself was ordered closed. No person is allowed in the vicinity of the Ce day -street side of the wrecked Equitable Life building? the walls on that side having bulged two feet and being in danger of falling in momentarily. Great damage to the American Echange Nation al Bank building would follow. The falling of the Cedar street walls would also probably pre cipitate the front walls intQ Broa cipitate the front walls into Broadway. .New York, Jan. 10. Money, jewels and securities to the value of 52,000,000,000 are buried in the seething ruins of the Equitable building. ' The financial district of New York is swarming with plain clothed and uniformed police, watching for the sl...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The day book. — 10 January 1912

T'r ytf"1 (f&&T" 'with a force, say experts, greater than that of a high explosive. tl is feared that if the walls col lapse they will go crashing down through the flimsy floor of Broad way and into the subway. The billion or more dollars' ;worth of securities in the Mercan tile Vaults are, believed to be per fectly safe. These vaults are in the basement .They are modern, and fireproof. It is not believed fche fire can reach them. But even if the wrecking com panies now at work could get to the (Jors of these vaults, they could not be opened. Permit--ting a rush of oxygen laden air into the vaults' would cause spon taneous combustion, and the de struction of everything within vaults. The vaults of the Equitable Life are on the first floor. They contain securities worth $400, 000,000, four million being in ac tual money. These values, say the firemen, are doomed. Momentarily the firemen are expecting these vaults to go crashing through the first floor and into the basement An...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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