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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1998

December 1998/ January 1999 Frederick couple captures FB young farmer award By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor ROANOKE—John and Sarah Stelzl dreaded phone calls, and they cringed each afternoon when the local newspaper arrived. A whirlwind of controversy showed up in June 1997 at the Stelzl's Frederick County farm. All they wanted was to add a hog operation to their farm, but angry neighbors demanded that government officials put a stop to it. Eventually, the Stelzls won. John, 27, and Sarah, 25, gained wisdom from their experience, and it helped them earn the title, "Young Farmers of Year," from the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. They received the award during the VFBF Annual Convention, which was Nov. 30Dec. 3. "When we decided to go into the hog business, we didn't know we would spend the next several months defending our right to farm, private property rights, and arguably, some basic civil rights," John wrote in the application for the young farmer of the year contest The...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1998

Farm Bureau News Protective structure is cheaper than a funeral By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist RICHMOND—If you could save your own life, wouldn't you? Anyone who drives a tractor without a roll bar risks his life. However, installing a rollover protective structure could mean the difference between life and death. Tractor overturns have the highest fatality rate for all on-farm tractor accidents, according to the National Safety Council. "Our statistics show that about two-thirds of the tractor deaths in Virginia could have been prevented with a ROPS and a seat belt, " said Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Safety Coordinator E. Bruce Stone. "It's like we have a cure for cancer," added Ron Saacke, VFBF assistant safety coordinator. "We know what's killing farmers and we know how to stop it. We just have to get people to realize it." Many farmers say they don't want to spend the money. But spending less than $1,000 on a ROPS is much cheaper than a funeral. So to give far...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1998

December 1998/ January 1999 Don't get caught in a cloud of Y2K cyberdust By BRANCH ALLEN VFB Product Development Analyst RICHMOND—The once futuristic concept of the "year 2000" is just around the corner and some may not be prepared. Software designers of the 1950s had no idea how dependent our society would become on computers and related items, such as computer chips. Neither did these designers anticipate that a 2-digit date field would become a "comput- er bug" in the next century when "99" turned over to "00" and would be read as "1900" instead of "2000." Let's consider some possible scenarios. It's 5 a.m. on Saturday, jan. I, 2000. The outside temperature has fallen below 20 degrees Fahrenheit during the past three nights. A poultry producer starts his routine poultry house inspection. He thinks about his operation's improved efficiency with the installation of the thermostatically controlled heating and automatic feeding systems five years earlier. With the shiver of a chill a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1998

Farm Bureau News Classified Advertising Guidelines Farm Bureau News accepts classified advertisements only from members of the Virginia Farm Bureau One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each member. If the ad runs more than 15 words, then the member must pay $5. Ads over 30 words will not be accepted. I Payment MUST accompany order. Check only, NO CASH accepted. Make checks payable to Virginia Farm Bureau. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please TYPE your ad and mail to: Farm Bureau News Classifieds, PO Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. You may fax to 804-784-2588 or e-mail to cvand@vafb.com. I Classified ads WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > DEADLINE: Ads must be RECEIVED (not mailed) by the 10th of each month preceding the publication month. The September and October issues are combined, as well as the December and lanuary issues. The deadline for the September/October issue is August 10 and the deadline for the December/lanuary issue is November 10. I Repeat ads mu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1998

December 1998/ January 1999 Beef, poultry, grain producers join VFBF board (Continued from page 2) He's been a county Farm Bureau director for 18 years, and has been a delegate to the American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention four times. In July, Gov. Jim Gilmore appointed Anderson to a four-year term on the State Air Pollution Control Board. He has a private pilot license, and has been a member of the Virginia Civil Air Patrol for 25 years, serving as a squadron commander for four years. He served with the Virginia Army National Guard for seven years. He's a member of the Frederick County Fruit Growers Association and has been chairman of the Virginia Horticulture Society's Peach Committee. He has a certificate in agricul- The Farmers Market (Continued from page 14) WANTED — For personal collection. Kids cast aluminum pedal tractors, absolutely no condition too bad. 757-242-9658. THREE WOOD COOK STOVES -- Good condition. Working wringer type washing machine and one for part...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1998

Over 12 Health Insurance Plans To Choose From. Not everyone has the same Medical needs... Choice: Plus not everyone has the same budget for Health Insurance...That's why Virginia Farm Bureau offers a Choice of Health care programs and options. Why pay for coverage you do not need? Best Value Now you can choose a plan which will give you the coverage you For Your Dollar: need... and will fit your budget. We believe quality protection and personal service go hand in hand. \ Personal Service: With over 100 local Farm Bureau offices throughout Virginia, \ \ personalized service can be as close as your own community. H Ith C C " Broad Range of # jf y OU are un( j er a g e 55 — f or Individuals or families Coverage • If you are over age 65 — Medicare supplement • If you are a small business — coverage for 2-99 employees. HESEESH You choose the health care plan that fits your needs... and your budget! bbl, AVAILABLE THROUGH FARM BUREAU FOR MEMBERS ONLY. Bruce Hiatt is Virginia Three le &am...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau I . News/ Volume 58, Number 1 Concern is who will farm in next millennium Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of articles about the challenges confronting Virginia's future generations of farms and farm families. By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—If a typical farmer produces food for 129 Americans, what happens if that farmer retires and isn't replaced? What happens to the land where he or she farmed? How would this affect the farm equipment store or feed store where he shopped? What if all 40,000 farmers in Virginia retired one by one and no one replaced them? The average age of farmers in this state is 55. These are questions that agriculture leaders are asking because these are events that could occur. In fact, it has the potential to happen across America. Farmers make up only 2 percent of the population, and as they retire, young farmers aren't rushing in to replace them. "This is the most critical problem facing agriculture over the next 20 y...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News 10 Nutrient specialists not enough (Continued from page 1) they voted it as one of 10 legislative priorities this year. "If they (legislators) want to mandate nutrient management plans, then they need to pay" for the technical assistance needed to write and enforce the plans, said Terry Martin, a Shenandoah County poultry producer and cattleman. Martin said he's had a nutrient management plan for about five years now, but couldn't have developed one without the help of the nutrient management specialist who works in his area. Even without new mandates to regulate poultry producers, there aren't enough resource people to help farmers comply with existing mandates, such as the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act and requirements for Animal Feeding Operations, said Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "There are only about 10 nutrient management specialists in all of Virginia trying to address the needs of 1,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Farm Bureau working to get settlem Virginia tobacco growers, like many other hard-working farmers across the state, are seeing their incomes dwindle right before their very eyes. For more than three decades, unfair excise taxes have riddled the state's 8,000 tobacco-growing families by inhibiting cigarette demand, and hence sales, through hefty local, state and federal taxes. These taxes amount to as much as 53 1/2 cents per pack of cigarettes. And for the past two years, growers of the golden leaf have seen their quota allotments—the amount of tobacco the government decides they can grow— reduced by about 32 percent. Quotas are determined by the federal government and are based in part on the buying intentions (demand) of the major tobacco companies. With tobacco as the backbone of many Southside and Southwest Virginia economies, Pork producers seeing hard times Times are hard for hog farmers. If you apply inflation, we're witnessing the lowest hog market in history. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Right to Farm laws under attack by state lawmakers RICHMOND—AIong with the new year, Virginia farmers are preparing for new attacks on a law that protects them from unfair restrictions. Sen. Madison Marye, D~ Shawsville, chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources, has prefiled a bill to revoke provisions of the Right to Farm Act for confined animal feeding operations of 300 animal units or more. "This is a frightening scenario for Virginia farmers," warned Wilmer Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "This bill would gut the Right to Farm Act." if the bill passes, no livestock operation would be protected from a locality that may want it shut down simply because of its smell, Stoneman said. "Even worse, anyone living near a farm could sue the farmer for almost any reason, such as smell, noise, dust or whatever," he added. Right to Farm laws protect farmers from unrea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Business loans harder to come by in rural areas BLACKSBURG —If tobacco producers want to diversify or change careers, they may have trouble getting the money to do so. The results of a Virginia Tech study show that residents of rural areas in Southern Virginia may have trouble borrowing money to start a business. "There isn't a shortage of money—that's not the issue," explained Karen Mundy, communications coordinator for Virginia Tech's Rural Economic Analysis Program, which conducted the study. "The link that's missing is how to get the money." REAP conducted the study in 1997 after the 1996 Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution to examine the accessibility of capital in rural communities. The Satellite subscription has freebies RICHMOND —You'll receive $300 worth of coupons when you subscribe to PRIMESTAR digital satellite TV service between now and April 30. Any Virginia Farm Bureau Federation member can subscribe to PRIMESTAR, receive a discounted installat...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News Viewing Virginia Right to Farm laws under attack by state lawmakers RICHMOND —Along with the new year, Virginia farmers are preparing for new attacks on a law that protects them from unfair restrictions. Sen. Madison Marye, DShawsville, chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources, has prefiled a biil to revoke provisions of the Right to Farm Act for confined animal feeding operations of 300 animal units or more. "This is a frightening scenario for Virginia farmers," warned Wilrner Stoneman, senior assistant director of public affairs for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "This bill would gut the Right to Farm Act." If the bill passes, no livestock operation would be protected from a locality that may want it shut down simply because of its smell, Stoneman said. "Even worse, anyone living near a farm could sue the farmer for almost any reason, such as smell, noise, dust or whatever," he added. Right to Farm laws protect farmers from unrea...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Business loans harder to come by in rural areas BLACKSBURG —If tobacco pro- ducers want to diversify or change careers, they may have trouble getting the money to do so. The results of a Virginia Tech study show that residents of rural areas in Southern Virginia may have trouble borrowing money to start a business. "There isn't a shortage of money—that's not the issue," explained Karen Mundy, communications coordinator for Virginia Tech's Rural Economic Analysis Program, which conducted the study. "The link that's missing is how to get the money." REAP conducted the study in 1997 after the 1996 Virginia General Assembly passed a resolution to examine the accessibility of capital in rural communities. The Satellite subscription has freebies RICHMOND —You'll receive $300 worth of coupons when you subscribe to PRIMESTAR digital satellite TV service between now and April 30. Any Virginia Farm Bureau Federation member can subscribe to PRIMESTAR, receive a discounted install...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News AITC Board gets new members Jack King, vice president of forest resources for Chesapeake Corporation, and Donna Pugh Johnson, president of the Virginia Agribusiness Council, have been appointed to the board of directors of the Virginia Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom. King brings extensive knowledge of the forest industry and experience in education to the board. He has served as chairman of the New Kent County School Board and the Virginia School Board Association. He also serves as a board member on the Virginia Forestry Educational Foundation. Ms. Johnson has served as president of the agribusiness council since 1994. Before joining the agribusiness council, she was vice president of corporate services for Colonial Farm Credit, ACA, the state's largest rural and agricultural lender. Ms. Johnson has been a member of the AITC Advisory Committee since 1996 and is also a member of the Virginia Council of Farmer Cooperatives membership and educa- tion comm...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Girls, women take on new roles for ag promotion Women care about agriculture. And many of our Farm Bureau women have been recognized for that concern. "It's an honor to help keep agriculture in the minds of everyone as well as informing individuals on the importance of agriculture to society," our new Miss Virginia Farm Bureau Anne Adkerson said in her acceptance speech. Miss Adkerson grew up on a Pittsylvania County grain and tobacco farm. Ag leaders want more specialists (Continued from page 2) frequency of state inspections of those plans and facilities. In addition, the 1999 General Assembly was expected to approve House Bill 1207 during the January/February session. This would require poultry producers to implement nutrient management plans. "The demand for nutrient management plans was already high because of all the state mandates, but House Bill 1207 significantly increases the demand," Stoneman said. Other groups have recognized the need for additional nutrien...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News President says people must feel appreciated Listening to them is vital By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor RICHMOND—During his years in the military, law enforcement, insurance and agriculture, Bruce Hiatt has gained some wisdom in working with people. "We need to listen to people," said the soft-spoken, new president of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. "A lot of people have very good ideas. We should encourage them to be involved. There's a lot of potential out there and some people are just waiting to be asked." In addition, he pointed out, volunteers "don't expect anything monetarily, but they like to feel appreciated," he added. "We must let people know we appreciate them and we must be supportive of them." Hiatt, 58, was elected president on Dec. 3 by delegates at the VFBF Annual Convention in Roanoke. Hiatt, who has a apple and cherry orchard in the Cana community of Carroll County, had been vice president since 1988. He replaced the now-retired Wayne A...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Farmers don't want higher, leftover electric rates RlCHMOND—Electric deregulation is likely, but will commercial users and city dwellers buy up cheap electricity, leaving rural residents with higher rates? That's a question agriculture leaders and some in the electric utility industry are asking. State lawmakers are considering a proposal to deregulate the electric utility industry. Electric rates already dip as low as 5.5 cents per kilowatt hour in parts of Virginia. The average is 8.5 cents in the Old Dominion, said Mark Tubbs, manager of governmental affairs for the Virginia, Maryland and Delaware Association of Electric Cooperatives. That compares with rates as high as 13.5 cents in New Hampshire. "Some people don't see the potential for cost savings with deregulation because Virginia is already a low-rate state," said Mandi Smith, a legislative specialist for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. A large multi-state electric power company could conceivably raise ra...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News Old remedies sometimes best for good health It seems as if consumers are bombarded on a daily basis about the benefits associated with new "miracle" drugs. Diet pills, treatments for hair loss and drugs that prevent heartburn are just a few examples. The problem Is that new studies come out just as frequently, and often contradict previous findings. Who has time to keep up with the onslaught of information? Physicians and researchers continue to learn more about age-old treatments. Recent studies show that the benefits of some ancient remedies still hold Share safety tips with your children Perhaps the saddest aspect of U.S. violent crime statistics is the enormous number of children — more than 1 million—who are listed among the victims each year. But parents can give their children a few simple crime prevention techniques. (These are from Kids in Control, a personal safety curriculum for 8- to 10-year-olds developed in cooperation with the Boys and Girls Clubs of ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

February 1999 Money for annual food tab earned by Feb. 9 By KATHY DIXON VFBF Communications Specialist By Feb. 9, the average American family has earned enough money to purchase food for all of 1999. On average, American consumers spend only 10.7 percent of their disposable income for food, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. When applied to the calendar, that comes out to 40 f . ** IXT W % T BP" ' » fl %KJI m-w - -*- fl C^ — mfw wsmHM p i lill S I «M K JL'- %m|M^Bflte|jj iflH ' oBBj H | K M ■ Slit: wauls io In: a mom when sine grows op. He warils lo know when he'll get 1 unch, on jusl wanl ikem protected forever, Wketker it s protecting your family tkrougk koine, uuto or life insurance, we ve got ike coverage you need to plan [or ike future. Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance kelps you ke ikere for ike ones you love. 1 3 VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU TOWN & COUNTRY INSURANCE COMPANY HELPING YOU IS U)ll(lt W£ (If) b(!St VIR...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1999

Farm Bureau News Government restraint necessary ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.—The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's delegation of 75 joined 6,000 other farmers in attendance here and heard several nationally known farm and business leaders call for j more government restraint in regulatory matters affecting farmers. American Farm Bureau Federation President Dean Kleckner called for an immediate moratorium on regulations that he said are cutting deeply into the pocketbooks of the nation's farm families. Economist Richard Belzer, a self-appointed regulatory watchdog, said that Washington poli-cy-makers have prepared a bountiful platter of options for regulating the regulators. "But what seems to be served up is an inedible stew of failure." Tennessee Farm Bureau President Flavius Barker warned farmers that "if we don't get control of regulations, they'll soon get control of us." Barker argued that "federal regulatory agencies have been on autopilot for a long time," with few real administration o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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