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Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,559 items from Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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AN ANTIQUE PHRASE. The "Are and of Right Ought to Be" Used in the Declaration. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

AN ANTIQUE PHRASE. The "Are and of Right Ought to Be" Used in the Declaration. Has it ever occurred to you that that one of the )ingering sentences or phrases which Tbom;as Jelterson wrote into the Declaration really is a veritable ailtique? Professor \Wiliam A. Dunniug. o" Colulmbla University, about lllteen years ago poinic? out that the phrase "Are, and of right ought to be," has been used so often that he would not be surprised to fnd somne Egyptologist discover its equivalent on an Egyp (ian temple. Hle began tracing the phrase and ifrst round Swift had used something like It in referring to the Church of Ireland. Of course, Richard Henry Lee had used it before Jefferson in his resolu tion in Congress, June 7, 1776. Bnt before Dean Swift had aDplied it, the Bill of Rtights which placed \Villiam and Mary on the Biritish throne said of them that they "didl bec.nme, were, are andi of right oughiLt to be by-laws of this realm our sove reign lord and lady." iThat did not satisfy Pro...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
He Got It. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

He Got It In a Canadian camp somewbere In England, a second George Washing ton hb been found. He, in company with several others, had been granted folur days leave, and, as usual, wired for extenalon. But no hackneyed ex cuce was his. In fact, it was so orf ginal that it haa been framed, and now hangs in a prominent position In the orderly room. It ran as follows: "'obody dead, nobody ill; still going otrong; having a good time, and got plenty of money. Please grant extension"--and he got it! "I hear she is to be murried. Who is the happy man?" "Her tither."

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Giving the Chauffeur Away. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

Giving the Chauffeur Away. iHe left his hotel and turned into the next street, where a huge but amiable looking red-haired bobby attracted his notice. Then he hailed a taxi and drove away. Alighting at his destlna tion half an hour aInter he was sur prised to Ilnd himself face to face with tihe same big bobby. "Blss me!" he exclaimed. "How's this" I noticed you in the street where I took this taxi four or five miles away." "I noticed you. too, sir," replied the officer, "but it wasn't four or five miles afway. You hired the conveyance Just where you're standing at present." "What!" roared the fare, looking about him. Then he flushed and looked at the chauffeur, and the chauf feur blushed and looked away.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHE ALWAYS WORE A SLEEVE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

SHE ALWAYS WORE A SLEEVE. By Elinor Marsh. Lieutenant Arthur Delano, of the United States Navy, having certain duties connected with lighthouses on the Atlantic coast, one day was pull ,d up to the Ellison reef light by a crew of sailor oarsmen, and upon stepping on to tile landing-place was received by a girl about nineteen years old. "Father has been obliged to go in to town to-day,'" she said. "A part of the machinery connected with the light broke and must be repaired be foro time for lighting." "And you are In charge, I sup pose?" "[ am." There was one of those mutual at tractions between the otlicer and the girl that sometimes appear at once when two persons of opposite sex meet. "Let me see," said Delano: "this light is in charge of-" "Edward Jamleson." "And you are--- " "Ellle Jamleson." The girl conducted him through the lighthouse on a tour of inspection, which he seemed in no hurry to fin ish. Then he got back into the boat and was pulled away. After that he made numerous...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why He Left. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

Why He Left "Why did you leave your last place?" wsked a country epqulre of an Irish ap-. plicant for the post of valet?" "I?ecauso the man of the house was no gintleman!" wao the reply. "What did he do?" eald the squire. "He locked me out of me room, an' throwed me clo'ea out of the windy, an' called in an officer an' put me out of the house by main force, an', be gorm, O0 left an' never wint backl"

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

Why. Mrs. Topmore did not attend the cooking clasees just for the fun oa the thing. She really paid attention to what the lecturer said, made useful notes., and bought no end of tin things and pastry contraptfons. And when Topmore came home to tea recently, there, flumb in the centre of the table, stood a cake. "You must try it, Robert," said Mrs. Topmore. Robert did try it It tried Robert, too. But he munched away as though he really enjoyed the thing. "What do you call it, dear?" he ask ed. "Feather cake, Robert" "Some birds can't fly, can they, dad?" asked Master Topmore innocent ly. And Mrs. Topmore doesn't know to thfs day why her husband laughed and told the boy not to make impertinent remarks at the tea-table.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FAT FACTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

FAT FACTS. There is no fat in potatoes. Lard is nearly 90 per cent fat. Iutter is practically a pure fat. Cream is the best form of fat for children. The fat of plants is contained in the seeds. At least a third of the body's food should be fat Cocoa is the only popular beverage which has "fat." The colder the climate the greater the craving for fat. B?ody fat is of three kinds-stearine, psalmitin and oleine. Oats are the "'fatteet" and most "heating" of the cereals. A loin of mutton has more fat nu trient than any other joint. .ats yield glycerine, an essential component of high explosives. In human bodies the fat is in the bone, marrow and adipfose tissue. A famine in fat (as in Germany) is more terrible than a famine in bread. A maan doIng sedentary work re quires three ounces of fat daily in some form F'at does not digest in the mouth or stomach, but in the small intestine. The Germans consumed per head more fat than any other European na tion. Cows' milk contains from 3H to 4 p...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THINK BIG THINGS. Give Your Imagination Play and Try to Live Up to Your Dreams. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

THINK BIG THINGS. ;ive Your Imagination Play and Try to Live Up to Your Dreams. an't it true that the only thing which makes it possible for us to per .orci the daily drudgeries of life is the hope for better things which JlOotus in our hearts? tlope is romance. Ambition is ro znance. All the ine, true inspirations sf lfe are romantic. Romance leads to achievement, unless it blossoms in the mind of a lazy, shiftless creature who is incapable of action. The man who leads a forlorn hope as romantic. The hero who gives his &ife fighting a dread disease to which no succumbs, but against which he nus Insured humanity. Is romantic. itomance is the thing which makes it worth while for men to sacrifice ma terlal comforts and die on strange ields of honor. In a materialistic world, where we have to deal with the facts of earning our living and fighting for place anu position, the thing which lifts us above blind instinct is romance. Cher ish your dreams, for they give you a dlimpae o...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POWER OF MONEY. And the Danger That May Come with Undue Love of Wealth. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

POWER OF MONEY. And the Danger That May Come with Undue Love of Wealth. it is convenient to have money. We :ll see many ways In which we would .ike to use it But when we have .uoney we are all apt to wish it just a .rtle more. Who It .' say what is the exact amount it is right that we "hould possess? Wishes, tastes, de. -ires, differ. WVe ourselves do not know what our limit should be. With too much money one is likely to become conceited. to lose sympathy and be hard-hearted and more than ilkely regardless of the. means he lakes to add to his store. It he has too little he may be envious of oth ers, embittercr toward society, tempt od to dishonesCy, or there may be real ;uffering for need of what money can ouy No one, not even the man in a ,rison cell, can live in any degree or comfort without money. It is neces .ary to life. Yet there are -many things of greater value than money, things that :noney cannot buy, that are necessary to our welfare. Undue love of money is a poison in t...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ENEMIES AS AN ASSET. Without Them Nobody Ever Accomplishes Anything. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

ENEMIES AS AN ASSET. Without Them Nobody Ever Accomplishee Anything. No man can accomlplish anly great thing without making enemies. It is said a man may be "known by the enemies lie makes." Observe the kind of enemies one makes and their rea sons for enmity. The man who makes no enemies is comparatively worthless. The Bible says, "'Woe un to you when all men slhall speak :well of you." It is not necessary to court enern les, but if you encounter hostility in the course of pursuing your way hon estiy and with your best judgment do not allow it to disturb you. He lwho has no enemies is not likely to have real friends. If you would nlmeasure a man's worth, observe his enemies. Of what character are they? Witls are their reasons for being at en mity? Whle the wise man should be undaunted by his enemy, neither should he he unmindful of him. Re concile your enemy, it piossible, but never fawn on him or cringe to hinm, in the hope of making him a friend. This will win his contempt. It is ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE EYE OF THE SUBMARINE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

THE EYE OP THE SUBMAR#UIE ---+----T Durlng hia reent v it to the Gracd Fleet,. tha King inspcted one of the latest sibmari~neE. 3rd aft pencetrat~ ing into evwry part of the ;essel did not forget to peep throu~bh the peri scope. It ;s not .enerally Snown that the history of the periscpe- dates hack to the timr of Aristotle and Eodld. Of courserc. neither at thes erudite ancients had the actual article which is teing uer, in the submarine and the trenches to-day., but they discov ered the theory of that part of light and optics which in present in the working of the periscope. At a later date the camera obscura canme to bath the world, the scient iets of the ifteenth century having Prolved a box in which an image can be thrown and traced by a pencil in to an actual picture. The idc:a was quicU~ly seizecd upon by showmen, and a camcra ohscura hecanme a fcture of ?very eido show ancd exhibition. From first to last the showman made a good deal of money out of the idea, until people came...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR BRIGHEST STAR. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

OUR BRIGHEST STAR. ----+---- Sirius, our brightest star, is estim ated by astronomers to be, in round numbers, seventy billion miles dis tant-that is seventy, followed by twelve noughts. It is called a fixed star, hutL it movee aboult an inch a century. Yet that movement, so mi rxoscopically seen from the earth, to e visaible at all must represent a movement or speed of 1,900,00') a day each day in the year. If the sky is clear look for Sirius to-night, and think that the light by which you see it left the star nearly thirty years ago, yet light travels 110,000 miles a second, and takes under eight minutes to pass from sun to earth. But compared with Sirius our sun is a mere flicker, a candle to a arc light. If the two were to exchange places in the universe, our sun wouldi almost pop out of eight altogether, being barely visible to the naked .ye, a sitar of the sixth magnitude. / But this earth and all its boasted power and wealth would be shrivelled up just like a hit of tow in a ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A NEW STORY Of Absorbing Interest and Dramatic Situations, entitled ARNA'S SACRIFICE, Commences in This Issue. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

A NEW STORY Of Absorbing Interest and Dramatic Situations, enti1d ARNA'S SACRIFICE, By EILEEN and ELLICE CRANE. Authors of "Plerrette," "John Camberon," "Under Hier Hlusband's Thumb," Etc., Etc. Commences in This Issue. ARNA'S SACRIFICFI?. By EILEEN and ELLICE CRANE Authors of "Plerrette." "John Camberon," "Under Her Husband's Thumb," Etc., Etc. Published by Special Arrangement. (Copyright) CHAPI'TER I. "You should be a queen or a duchess rather.. ." Jill Brandemere stood before her silver-framed mirror, and puushinug back the heavy waves of rcd-gold hair trou1m her forehead, intently coutenplated the face that was reflected there. "No," she said wonderingly, half aloud, "I look just the same as I did last oight Yet to-day I am twenty-one -actually a woman-with a. perfect right to take my lifo into my own hands and do what I will with it with out anyone being able to say 'yes' or 'no'." For one silent moment she gazed at her reflection in the mirror, wonder ing, as a girl will who i...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
U-BOAT ATROCITY. THE HORRIBLE STORY OF THE BELGIAN PRINCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

U-BOAT ATROCITY. THE HORRIBLE STORY OF THE BELGIAN PRINCE. The Press Association has received copies cf the affidnvito made by the three survivors of the steamer Bel gian Prince, tthe torpedoing of which was accompanied by particularly cal lous treatment of her crew. Thomas A, Bowman, the chief en gineer, in his statement, says that while they were getting into the life boats the submarine fired at and de stroyed the ship's wireless aerials, and then, coming round to star-board fired at the ship's side with a mac hine gun. When the boats were well away the submarine carae up to them The commander ordered the master to step on the submarine, and took him inside. Then all the crew and officers were ordered aboard, searched, and the life-belts taken off most of the crew and thrown overboard. During this time the Germans were very abusive towards the crew. The German sailors got into two life-boats, threw the oars, bailers, and gratings overboard, took out the provisions and compasses, ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RIGHT COLOUR FOR COOLNESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

RIGHIT CC?(LOUR FOR COOLNESS It an attempt to illustrate graphi cally the relative values for summer wear of different colours in dress mat erials, an interesting experiment was recently conducted. Four strips of cloth, made of the same material and weight, but of different colours, were placed on a cake of ice-and exposed to the sun. The fabrics were white, yellow, red, and black. The result showed in a striking way how white reflects the sun's rays while black absorbs them. The ice covered by the piece of white cloth was not melted to any appreciable degree dur ing the test; that under the yellow Istrip was slightly depreseed; a deep cut was formed beneath the red cloth and a groove approximately twice as :deep as that covered by the latter was melted under the black fabric.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ladies' Column. WHAT MAKES HAIR SUDDENLY TURN GREY? [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

Ladies' Golumn. WHAT MAKES HAIR SUDDiNUY TURN GREY? 7. A phenom-mnon that has :lwayrs aroused curicsity is the sudden turn ing grey of the hair under the infiu enlce of great emotion. One instance occered to a :you?n soldier. ie was in a trench which was blo'en :p by a mine. He was Iproected into the air then fell beneath a pile of debris. When extricated he was found to be deaf, and a few days later in hospit al he noticed that there were tufts of white ,hair on the leic aide of his head. The grey hairs were stolidly implanted and could be pulled out only by considerable force. Subseq uent investigation showed that the patient's left side of the head and face was most iniured by the explos ion and' the fall of earth. lie also suffered from an inceseant twitching of the left eye-lid. As his hair slow ly whitened on the left side the don tors came to the conclusion that the injuries sustained were directly re sponsible.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. When sprinkling clothes use -,hot water. It damps them more evenly. For setting a rat-trap, use bread soaked in linseed oil. Rats cannot resist linseed-oil. Old potatoes steeped in cold water overnight will be much whiter when ready for serving. To keep flies out of the larder have the windows sponged with a weak. solution of carbolic acid and water. An ounce of alum added to the rinsing water or to the starch will render muslin or cotton goods almost fireproof. If the oven is too hot, put a basi. of cold water in it. This will reduce the temperature of the oven imrmed lately, and steam from the water will not injure anything that is being cooked, except puff pastry. Cold tea-leaves bound on a burn with a soft rag will give immediate relief. If you have none at hand, pour boilmg water on some tea, let it stand for a few moments, drain the water off, squeeze the leaves through cold water, and apply them to the burn. A remedy for worms in flower pots is to water the p...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MEN MUST EAT MORE THAN WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

MEN MUST EAT MORE THAN WOMEN. It appears that a man must eat more than a woman. An investiga tion at the nutrition laboratory of the Carnegie Institute has shown that the average man generates 1,638 heat units or calories in 24 hours, and the average woman only 1,355 ; and that under the same conditions, the male needs 5 or 6 per cent. more nutrition than the female. The difference is at tributed to the man's larger propor tion of active service. The woman seems to have more fat or inactive tissue, and the difference becomes greater with increase in body weight.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SECRETS OF FLOWER COLOUR. REASON FOR RED AND PINKS. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

i SECRETS OF FLOWER COLOUR. REASON FOR RED AND PINKS. SOne of the commonist flower colours is a purplish pink that often just misses becoming a distinct rose or a decided red. As a matter of fact, the good reds and pinks are comparative ly rare in any flora, and the reason of this is becoming to be well under-. stood. The normal colour of the pig ment which produces both red and blue flowers is this same purplish pink. When the sap of the plant is alkaline this purplish blue turns to pink and when it is acid the flowers become blue or red. When this is re alised, several other pecularities of flowers become intelligible. For instance, there are many blue flowers, such as the lungwort, which are pink in the bud. As the flowers open and oxidation processes reduce the acidity of the cell sap, the pink of necessity..must become blue. This also explains why so many blue flow ere and its blossoms are.likely to be come pink or red. The rose coloured variety of aster may be explained in thi...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN THE AERO-BUS COMES! [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 11 January 1918

WHEN THE AERO-BUS COQ ES ! O=e of the resulte of air navii.atio wil surl-y be a slump in Atpine climbing. Whie the airmen can climb to twsenty thousand f·e1t on a thin atrooshere, he will not crre to toil by devi-ols routes and precipitous patha to the top of the Matterhorn. t~ndee~. there is nothing to preveot him.except a certain dflfculty in the landing. romn alightmng on the sum mit of Muunt Blanc, taking a look round, and then placinu, down to "tea." AS THE CIROW FLIES. Certainly a goodl mnoh things that are looked upon now, and have been regarded for ages. as inaccersible and dangerous, will be the merest common places of the future, when the aero bus comes into civil life. The acience of aviation, by the pressure of cir cumstances, has made as much pro gress in three years as ordinarily it would have made in thirty-five. Think, for instance, how the great aeroplane of the future, which will carry supplies for weeks, as well as passengers, will simplify the explora tion of the...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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