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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A New Match Puzzle. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A New Match Puzzle. The object of the Rosebery Lone Furrow Match Puzzle is to make the "field" half as large again by judiciously "ploughing" the lone furrow; and this must be done without disturbing the four matches which bound the field at the outset. No. l shows how you place the matches on the table then asking your friends to puzzle out the problem propounded. The four matches which form the square are the original bounds of the field, and the four which jut out from each of the corners are called the trees. These must not be removed during the whole operation, the problem being to enlarge the boundaries of the field by the sole use of the centre match, which is called the lone furrow. This is done by cutting each of the boundary matches in two and the lone furrow one into four sections, as shown in No. 2.   The severed sections are then lifted off the table, care being taken not to disturb the posi- tion of the four trees. In No. 3 you see how the various sections...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE KILLING OF CAPTAIN COOK. WAS HE EATENP WHAT PRESENT DAY NATIVES SAY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE KILLING OF CAPTAIN COOK. WAS HE EATEN? WHAT PRESENT DAY NATIVES SAY. The Hawaiian Superintendent of Public Works recently obtained an interesting version of the much-varied Captain Cook story. Accord- ing to the traditions current in the island, which can be traced back to a source at the scene of Cook's death, histories are much in the wrong in their stories of the killing, and some of them of the eating of the English explorer. "They told me that the insides were eaten," said Superintendent Boyd, "when I happened to be conversing with native Hawaiians about the old story. The story runs that the natives took out the insides with a view to making an offer-   ing to the sea god. The rest of the body was to be offered to another god, but this part, consti-   tuting the best offering, was set aside in a cala-   bash, and I was shown the place where it is said   to have been left. "The eating was done by some children. They though...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A STRANGE RAT TRAP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A STRANGE RAT TRAP.     Rats are among the quickest of creatures and oysters the slowest. It is, therefore, surprising to learn that an oyster recently caught a rat. This happened in the shop of a fishmonger. The latter—who lives above his business premises— was awakened one night by an astonishing racket going on beneath him. He thought burglars were trying to break in. When he cautiously entered with a light he could see nothing unusual. The noise—now mixed with squealing—was proceeding from a dark corner. There he found a rat fran-   tically attempting to get down his hole, but pre-   vented from doing so by a large oyster that had   hold of his tail. The rat's tail had happened to   enter between the shells of the oyster as the   former was prowling about for food, and the   shells immediately closed and held him fast.   Then his ratship jumped for his hole, dragg...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHE DIDN'T SCORES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

SHE DIDN'T SCORE. Wife: "Who will mend your clothes when I am   gone?"   Husband: "Nobody. I'll be able to buy new   clothes then!"      

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
All Round the Globe. DREAD OF THE "FOREIGN DEVIL." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

All Round the Globe. DREAD OF THE "FOREIGN DEVIL.'' A high premium seems to be placed upon the foreigner's power in the Chinese courts, at least in a certain county in Eastern Shantung. A certain man had a lawsuit which seems to have gone against him in spite of all ordinary mea- sures. He suddenly left for Chefoo, but soon returned, and announced to his adversary that he had bought a foreign title. To prove the genuineness of his claim to official rank, he donned a suit of foreign clothes and flourished a cane. This was enough! The opposing parties sued for peace, and gave up their case. —"North China Herald."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW FLOWERS GET THEIR NAMES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HOW FLOWERS GET THEIR NAMES. Country customs have had their influence on   plant names. Thus, the S. scoparius lends itself   readily to sweeping up the cottage, and so be-   comes the broom, while another plant helps on   the family washing, and thence is named the   soap-wort. The tubers of the wild arum, supplied a stiffening to the noble collars of earlier days, and so an alternative name for the plant is the starch-wort; while the heads of the Dipsacus   tease and dress the homespun into the desired   texture and surface, and thus the plant becomes   the teasel.— "The Sun Children's Budget."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HORROR OF THE PIPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HORROR OF THE PIPE. One of the most amusing incidents connected with the conference of musicians was the glori- ous disgust of one of the attendants at the Hotel Cecil. This worthy functionary, temporarily taken off his duties of waiting upon South Af- rican milords and the aristocracy of the United States, declared that musicians were funny people, and—lifting up the palms of his hands— that they actually wandered in the evening through the corridors of the hotel smoking short pipes.— London "Truth."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LESSON TO LONDON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A LESSON TO LONDON. The largest excavated dock on the Continent,   if not in all the world, will doubtless be the "Maasdock," at Rotterdam, now approaching completion. The dock covers an area of some 150 acres, and will be brought to a preliminary depth of 11ft., which will afterwards be dredged to a depth of 28ft., so that there will be suffi- cient water to admit the largest steamers. The mass of earth excavated was used for the pur- pose of raising the adjacent streets, as well as the surrounding quays, which latter will have a total length of about two and a half miles. The dock will have sufficient capacity for 60 sea-going vessels.— "The Syren."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE BRITAIN LEADS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WHERE BRITAIN LEADS. It is estimated by the Bureau of Statistics that   500,000,000 of the earth's inhabitants five in colo-   nies or dependencies, and of these people, less than 15,000,000, or 3 per cent., are natives of Governing countries. This is the latest tabula- tion. The English-speaking population is about 133,000,000. They are outnumbered only by the people of China and India. Dominion over these people, however, or the greater part of them, falls to England. America plays a very small part.— "Pittsburg Dispatch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SARCASTIC MR. CHOATE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

SARCASTIC MR. CHOATE. Mr. Choate was once approached by a fresh young undergraduate who introduced himself as the son of one of the Ambassador's old friends. The youth was smoking a pipe, and constantly blew great clouds of smoke into Mr. Choate's face. Observing that the Ambassador was look- ing rather steadily at his pipe, the student said, proudly: "A birthday present." "Ah," replied   the lawyer, without taking his eyes from the loud-smelling bowl. "I should never have thought you were so old!"— "Toronto Saturday Night."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TALLOW CANDLES HAVE GONE OUT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TALLOW CANDLES HAVE GONE OUT.   Fully 85 per cent. of candles burnt in Great   Britain are made from paraffin wax, more or less   stiffened by varying admixtures cf stearine. Then   come stearine candles themselves, and finally   beeswax, spermaceti, and other candles composed   of mixtures of more or less rare waxes. We   have said "good-bye" to the tallow candle—it is   a smoky, smelly, wasteful light—but the beeswax   candle still remains with us, the most expensive   and luxurious, but quite the most respectable and   venerable of all.   —"Idler."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OBJECT TO CHAPERONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

OBJECT TO CHAPERONS. New York is going to have its last tussle with the chaperon question in the new apartment house for women that has just been—or is just to be—opened. Several times already hotels for women—either working for their living or of independent means—have been started, and have generally split upon the rock of the chaperon or matron. The women, in every case, have resent- ed the restrictions put upon their hours of out-   going and incoming, and the surveillance main-   tained over their guests. Self-supporting and in-   dependent women in the present day will not   stand being treated like girls in a boarding-school.   —"The Argonaut," San Francisco.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TIARAS AT THE CORONATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TIARAS AT THE CORONATION.   The peeresses are quite in spirits at the   idea that there are to be some changes made in   their prescribed costume for the Coronation. I   hear that the Queen advocates peeresses being   permitted to wear their diamond "fenders." This   would add much brightness to the appearance of   these ladies, who, without jewels, will hardly   look as if they were in full dress. And as it   will only be necessary to don their coronets at   the moment of the Queen's crowning, tiaras will   not be in the way as was at first supposed.   —"The   Gentlewoman."    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UP-TO-DATE AMERICAN METHODS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

  UP-TO-DATE AMERICAN METHODS.   In the Hawaiian trade, a San Francisco to-   bacco manufacturer has built up a demand for   smoking tobacco by means of a picture of a   locally famous tug-of-war, where a team of   athletic kanakas defeated a team from one of   U.S. men-o'-war. A glance at that picture,   symbolising the victory of the strong men of the   islands, not only pleases the native's fancy, but   induces them to buy the goods to which it is   attached.   —"The Trade Mark Record."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TAMMANY'S LEGACY OF CRIME. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TAMMANY'S LEGACY OF CRIME.     In the last ten years the population (of Greater   New York) has increased 35 per cent. The volume   of arrests has increased 9.8 per cent. Felony has   increased 103.9 per cent. Since 1890 there has   been a conspicuous increase in the following   crimes:—Burglary, 113 per cent.; grand larceny,   86 per cent.; receiving stolen goods, 257 per cent.;   robbery, 99 per cent.; election offences, 1,640 per   cent.—   "Brooklyn Eagle."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BLEACHING THE TEETH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

BLEACHING THE TEETH. The hair is not the only thing that is bleached.   For it has lately been discovered that the famous peroxide solution will whiten discolored teeth. Little holes are bored in them, and the bleaching   solution is injected, a small quantity at a time.   The first application makes the black tooth's   edges pale. The second spreads the pallor, and   the fourth or fifth completes the operation.—   "Philadelphia Record."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"ROSEBERY" JAM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

"ROSEBERY" JAM. Divers are the uses of popularity, as Lord Rose-   bery may well discover. Wherever he goes he   may be confronted by his name in some utili-     tarian connection. There is in London a Rose-     bery-avenue. and several business establishments     that have taken "Rosebery" for their sign. We     have long had a Rosebery collar, and now has ap-     peared a Rosebery jam.   —"Birmingham Daily   Gazette."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A TONKINESE "DE WET." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A TONKINESE "DE WET." As a result of the recent operations in China,   and the consequent paucity of (French) colonial   troops in Tonkin, the Black Flags, this time   armed with Mauser magazine rifles, are again on   the warpath, under the command of a Tartar   guerilla leader of the type of the elusive De Wet.   —"To-day."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CHAMPION MOUTH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A CHAMPION MOUTH.   A country youth with a very large mouth en-   tered a music-dealer's shop not far from Birming-   ham to purchase a mouth-organ. He was shown   every make of mouth-organ in the shop, but still   was not satisfied.   "Look here," said the assistant, "we shall have   to measure you for one. Just try your mouth   along this piano."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLOTHES THAT LASTED 40 YEARS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

J CLOTHES THAT LASTED 40 YEARS. In an article on "Martyrs of Money-making" in the "Quiver" for January, the Rev. H. B. Freeman tells the story of a miser, the Rev. M. Jones, for more than 40 years a curate in Berkshire, who combined personal niggardliness with performance of duty to others. This divine never allowed his weekly outlay to go beyond half a crown, and wore the same suit of clothes during the whole of his prolonged ministry. The surtout with which he started was even- tually reduced to a jacket, for it was turned inside-out, then tucked to hide the rents, and lastly had pieces cut off the skirts to replenish the upper portion. A fresh hat, in the fulness of years, the inge- nious Mr. Jones annexed from a neighborly and local scarecrow. And yet this unaccountable parson subscribed regularly and liberally to the Bible Society, to three missionary societies, as well as to the Society for the Conversion of the Jews.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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