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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

ppw count of ice cakes in which they were enclosed. The first four men w.ho diedn the fire were porters. Twenty minutes after the fire started thev were. seen at a window, in the j fifth story. They made frantic gestures, and then three of them umped to the street. Each was crushed to death as he strucjc Broadway. 1he fourth wavered for a foment, then fell back into the flames and perished.' Fire Chief William K. Walsh is missing. He was last seen on the sixth story of the building furiously fighting the flames. Captain of the Vaults John Campeon is dead. He was trapped in the very vaults that were under his care and protection. -o- T,he body of Conrad Siebert, a watchman, was found, burned and frightfully crushed, on the' first floor, The fire started at 5 :20 o'clock'' this morning. It spread with? such frightful rapidity through" the amazing labyrinths of the great building that by 8 o'clock the entire building was doomed beyond all hope. At 9:30 o'clock only the bare walls of th...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

-ynj,1(gwpmi'"i U-9,wmnfT nmumpwww descent lights turned the otherwise darkened interior into brilliancy as they flashed on the glittering marble and bronze. The first floor and a portion of the basement was occupied by the Mercantile Safe Deposit company, which was controlled by the Equitable. The famous Cafe Savarin, scene of many a gay party, occupied the remainder of the basement. The main office of the Equitable on the second floor consisted of a lofty hall, in which stood two rows of colored pillars, the working offices and the cashiers' department. . In the rear was a magnificent stained glass window to which a "marble-lined and marble-floored corridor led. Another passage led to a huge vault where at least $200,000,000 in securities were kept. On the same floor were the offices of August Belmont & .Company, the Mercantile Trust Company, and the Equitable Trust Company. ' T,he public quarters of the Equitable Society contained an insurance library of more than 8,5...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

tVtstfaiiwiflar- ' ""' THE RESCUE-OF PRESIDENT WILLIAM GIBLT3- The Story of a Fight for a-Man's Life That Will Stand -Forever in, the Records of Heroism. 'At 7:30 o'clock, a fireman came from the building and told his chief that three of his companions were trapped in the basejnent vaults of fhe building. The news spread like wildfire through 'the ranks of the department and the assembled crowds, and a groan went up. The building by then was a veritable 'vo.lcano of fire. Elames were bursting forth from every window, fr6m every crevice. Walls wer ebulging. Great granite 'block were detaching themselves, and craching to the ground with thunderous roars. .The doors to the basement were clogged with debris. A hundred firemen volunteered to rescue their comrades, and without waiting for orders sprang toward the basement entrances. With axes and crowbars, they dashed in and out, scorched by the heat, cased in ice, trying to chop out the three imprisoned men. At 8 o'clock, a fireman emerg...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

fwi - y-:'--- ,w'v-iu;ij,,jwyy?w.' nous. But at 9:10, after th'e most thrilling and heroic work ever seen at a New York fire, firemen fought their way into the main office, -and dragged out Giblin, who immediately collapsed. The other two were dead. Fire Commissioner Joseph Johnson first saw the men. Regardless of personal danger he bent over the grated window and peered into the agonized face of the only one of the trapped men still on his feet. "We'll get you out, old man," he shouted. Fireman James Dunn leaped to the assistance of his,chiefvBefore he could reach the window, Father McGeean, chaplain of the department, went to the window. Over his head a dozen streams of icy water were playing against the seething walls. Showers of -stone fell about the young priest. Chips struck him on the liead and shoulders, and brought the blood in flowing streams. Drenched to the skin, as the ice formed about him, Father McGeean stood calmly facing death and moved not until he had administered...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

$& $ Mt'tfrtSiTlfjQ 'rrreniAt'll OF INTEREST TO LABOR Washington, D. C, Jan. 9. The income of the American Federation of Labor from all sources for the last, quarter df the "year 1911, was $42,635, making a total, with the balance in hand, of $232,214, according to a report submitted to the executive council today by Secretary Frank Morrison. The total membership of organization affiliated with 'the federation for the month of 'December, 1911, was 1,831,578, an increase of 115,638 over the corresponding month for 1910 v Linton, Ind., Jan. 9. A strike of 550 miners at Freeman mines, Bicknell, over, the discharge of V machine gunners, was set for hearing tomorrow at Terre Haute, between National Vice President Frank Hays, for the miners, and John Hewitt, for the operators. Waterloo, la., Jan. 9. Striking members of the local iron moldersI union today were enjoined fom picketing or otherwise interfering with the operation of the Waterloo .Malleable x Iron Works. The injunct...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

m JtV' &fJ SSm , 'office wearing' a sweater. Now, altogether, B-r-r-r! Judge K. M. Landis criticized state . parole board yesterday when he sentenced R. L. Menning and John Dalton, paroled from Joliet, to U. S. penitentiary for counterfeiting. James Cain, 102, died yester day at 642 Parnell ave; Attrib-J uted long life to tea and rye bre'ad diet. r George Sheldon, 388 E? Huron; , B. F. Arnold and George Williams, salesmen, .and William Mjjysrs, brQker, arrested, charged with assaulting doorrnan at Lambs' cafe. Sheldon phoned Assistant Chief Schuettler, whoordered desk sergeant to allow men to sign own bonds. Last three declined to give addresses. Fire in four-story house at 2213 S. Michigan routed SO roomers living in place and did $1,500 damage! to building. Chicago section of Council of Jewish Women, religious and philanthropic society, yesterday voted to sever connections with the national body. Work will be carried on independently. Elenora Erickson, juvenile epilept...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm syfrri'me'Tpig -. ---jv tf"wt'-v. wrr - WOMEN FIND IT ECONOMY IN THE- CITY TO'FEEB HUNGRY PUPILS OF THE SCHOOLS Los Angeles, Cal Jan. 9. A I the familv to afford --more than tew public-spirited women of Lot Angeles have entered upon the task of demonstrating, to the. city government that the expenditure of a small portion of the cityfunds for -feeding poor children in the -public schools i hardheaded economy. The women have organized the familv to afford --more 4" -.j two meals a day. t , While Irs. -Bryant ,vas talking in the'kitchen 'the childin filed in and took' tHeir seats KeJore the steaming bowls.of gopd vegetable soup, and bread , '.; ' "Watch," sa'id Mrs. "Bryant, ''and see if you can telf'which of the children have Hadr,no' break- A Noon-Hour Scene at the Los Aneles Penny Kitchen. what they call the Civic association and have opeend a penny kitchen at one of the public schools. JIrs. Oliver C. Bryant is the president. t "To be certain we were right," says M...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

These children are not being pauperized. They pay their penny gladly and many of them are doing work to earn that penny. Some of the 'boys get a little ahead and pay 5 (Jents or so in advance. Such an arrangement entourages thrift and give the idea of saving with a definite purpose, something which most of these little folks have neverheard of before." "What happens with the child that has no penny?" Mrs. Bryant was asked. There was a tiny, thin-legged child who was thrusting a piece of paper at the boy keeping door. "That is an order from the teacher, saying that the child is hungry and ras no money. She will be given food and noo ther child will ever know. If she can pay later she will do so. "New York feeds hungry school children as a mater of economy- So many children fail to makertheir grades that physicians to determine the cause were called int . 'Hunger' was their answer. N(ew York found it cheaper to feed the children than to send them twice through the same grade. We belie...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

!q55)5f5-V'-t 'if there Was norway to hold the defendant on the concealed weapbn charge, but fined him $1 and costs for disturbance. "The state asks that the soup -o- be dtsttysgfed-on'a change of carrying concealed weapons," said Assistant State's Attorney Smejkal, gravely. .And with equal solemnity ". the judge adopted the suggestion.-;.-'- - TOM ANDREWS' FIGHT GOSSIP The defeat of Ted Whiting, the Australian middleweight, at Perth, West Australia, by Jimmy Clabby, of Hammond, Ind., reminds me of Gabby' s experience a year ago when returning from Sydne) Clabby was to box in Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth. At Melbourne he met a chap named Sanderson, a society boxer, regarded -as a comer. Some of the "wise" ones told the Hoosier that Sanderson was merely a fancy boxer who1 couldn't punch hard enough tobreak a pane of glass. They admonished Jimmy not to hit too hard, that the bout might be in--teresting. When .Clabby entered the ring Sanderson was waiting. Instead of a sickly youth,- ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

iH 'Z-.'i " .T.-r--.-.- , .T ., . J - APWft' "Oll'MtpMJL ' 1?s s Smith again, and also Bandsman Rice, who won over Jojinny Thompson. Indications point to sa real world's battle for the bantam-weight championship in February or March with Johnny Coulon, defending his crown against England's fly-weight champion, Sid Smitlj. Negotiations are on for a battle and it will go to the highest bidder. Smith will- be here shortly with his manager, W. E. Amet, and Billy Marchant, the sensational featherweight, who seeks Abe Attell'5 title. Matching Jim Flynn and Jack Johnson may sound well to some, but haloes' not have the right ring to me. We admit Flynn is a good man, but when you stack a good little man against a good big man the big man-wins, and that will be the case with Jack and Jim.. Tommy Burns was a good man, but he proved altogether too small for Johnson. o o MAILERS' ANNUAL DANCE , Annual ciance ot cmcago Mailers' union No. 2, will be given at Illinois hall, Madison street and Ogden...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

JWBSfit rfra? SjCir!fj'3Pf xt v ffiffir,' THE STREET RAILWAY PROBLEM IN TWO CITIES .Toledo, O. Following closely the temporary 'agreements to giye the city 3 cent fares for four hours during the day and six tickets for a quarter the rest of the hours, the Toledo Railways and Light company announced that the wages of the motormen and conductors in the employ of the company would be increased 1 cent an' hour. This will be effective Jan. 16. The scale of wages will be 22 cents an hour for the first year, 23 the second year, 24 the third, and 25 thereafter. News Item. , Toledo, Ohio, a city not very far from Chicago, but oh! how different. Chicago people are forced to pay a nickel for poor street car service and haven't even got the satisfaction of knowing that this excessive rate will enable the motormen and conductors to get a living wage. It seems that the people of Toledo are wiser than the people of Chicago, in not permitting the traction interests to bamboozzle them into a partner...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

0.' , isfJ,?5awB- W1EN fi Wfte CROUP By Leonard Keene Hirschberg, A. M"., M. D. With the possible exception of earthquakes there is nothing that frightens a young mother more than' the hard, dry, metallic-like cough, erroneously called 'croup'. It scares the parent more, and the doctor less, than any other symp-' torn known to medicine. Like other mistakes ter,ms such as "colds," "colic," and "rheumatism," the expression "croup" is the quack's or layman's cloak for a multitude of diagnostic sins. "Croup" actually as a disease exists only in the minds of the misguided, It is the symptom of several harmless maladies, and of only ope, diphtheriathat in days gone by could be called dangerous. Until the discovery of diphtheria anti-toxin, which has reduced the death rate of this dread trouble, from its last centttry toll of ninety, to the present five in every hundred cases, the word "croup," justly strqck terror to $ wbmahjs"heart. For before the days of the departments of health, befor...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

io , !8 "$$ - I rday proceeds, tdto at night struggles with shdfparched coughs, 'for air, when tne observant practitioner notes these ominous signs, he does not wait for the laboratory .to confirm his worst 'fears, but'gives the infant a large "dose of antj-toxin at once. " Unfortunately in country districts, the serum may not be immediately available. Then he gives an emetic, and fumigates the ulngs and throat with calomel inhalations until the specific is obtained. From all that I have said, the cautious mother will draw the correct inference that unless the child has given ample evidence . "preceding the "croupy cough," that he was ailing, she need have 'little fear. - FLAT DWELLERS ARE KILN DRIED By W. C. Cotton, M. D. ihe modern steam heated or furnace-heated flat is like a kiln ,and the people who live in them are likely to be kiln dried people unless they take trouble to neu- ' tralize the evil of the dry heat. And kiln dried people are more prone to disease than other-folks ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

MATTER OF LAJBELI It's a matter of labels pretty considerably. I f you're a man, a woman, an , automobile, a rose or a polecat, the label is one thing that counts. The hardest kind of work is easy if propf erly tagged "Play." Tom I Sawyer made that discovery early in life when he secured assistancerin whitewashing his' fence. Mostly, things you HAVE to do aren't any fun at all. The other day after a rain-out in San Diego, water settled in several little ," pohds on the newsies' baseball grounds. It required no threatened spanking to make those kids get a hustle on. In a twinkling they had every can in sight gath- ered-up andwere dipping the water from the ponds and carrying it to the edge of the sidewalk. One little canful after another they carried, until the water was gone. Then the youngsters started a baseball game. Label your work properly. o o DO YOU KNOW? Raisins often stick to the paper in which they have been wrapped. At such times hold the paper for a moment over the steam...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

r$m JAR P.RON.OUNCES IT HOG CHOLERA -. ?j CALM, AxiOCFf HERE 15 l .1 HAP A LPOSS ?UWE, -"x ' box. cAu.eo 'iseAses J Hot- fMshss, my hei is in J R FARM UWD JReSIDi SWJMMIN3, "UNO MV' fflOto ,J?ePgATT Mg' rX. 3"" BRCAT' C&MeS IN "S i Ijjl jofr -SYtrnaftts. .T 2p a shosjt Aos, yess t

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

BimaSnr-a &vjiis.i "SUJWBBMH y 'yi M!5 MiJpiie-' t,- y -THE DAILY SHORT STORY The Divine Champion. In the town of Bradford there j-wrere no other such spellers as Miss Letitia Summers and Bob Porter, the young editor of the gVeekly Mercury. Miss Summers could spell phythisis, quay, and metempsychosis just like pig .dog cat; and Mr. Porter never .hesitated over the "a" and the "e" .in stationary and stationery. It xwas for this that Miss Summers always blushed when she encountered him. The worst speller in town was spretty Virginia. Lee. Miss Lee shad been known to have trouble with words like hyena, bouquet aand ostrich. But she had a way of covering her retreat in a maze got rosy dimples and to the tune -of musical laughter that conjxjuered even her conquerors vthough never could she conquer the unyielding Miss Summers. For the purpose of practice in orthography, the Bradfordites ar ranged a Great Educational, Instructive and Diverting Spelling Bee, to be held at the Sc...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

'.&jM P V"g!JLVJv y ". u . "HE DAILY SHORT STORY ; The Divine Champion. , In the town of Bradford there ywere no other such spellers as Miss Letitia Summers and Bob if Portei, the young editor of the gVeekly Mercury. Miss Summers jcould spell phythisis, quay, and metempsychosis just like pig .dog cat; and Mr. Porter never .hesitated over the "a" and the "e" .ip stationary and stationery. It jwas for this that Miss Summers always blushed when she en-' countered him. The worst speller in town-was ""spretty Virginia Lee. Miss Lee v had been known to have trouble with words like hyena, bouquet stand ostrich. But she had a way of covering her retreat in a maze fpi rosy dimples and to the tune t fof- musical laughter that conquered even her conquerors rthough never could she conquer the unyielding Miss Summers. For the purpose of practice in orthography, the Bradfordites arranged a "Great Educational, Inf strtictive and Diverfino- npllino- JO Bee, to be held at the School Hous...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

rsN?? tvwtoim HSS?SBS!j8 clared Miss.Lqe? dimpling divinely, whije Hie spellers laughed.The battle was a fierce one. Innocent after innocent floundered and fell on Pygmalion, crustacean, syncope and neurasthenia, until the line was reduced to Miss Summers on the one side, and Miss Adams on the other. "Aberration," called the pronouncer. "A-b-e-r-a-t-i-o-n," spelled Miss Summers, unthinkingly. "A-b-e-double ra-t-i-o-n," Miss Adams cried quickly, and Miss Summers sat down in great embarrassment, Then a sudden summons came for the triumphant Miss Adams and she was compelled to depart. A demand was made for a substitute, and the rosy Virginia Lee declared to be the only person in the room who had not succumbed. Strong objections were urged by the Adams side, but the referee insisted Miss Lee was the .only one eligible, and, blushing, she faced the champion editor. The referee looked for something easy. "Giraffe," he called. "G-i-r-a-f," respqnded Miss Lee, while everybody tittered and l...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

clared MissXee. dimpling divinely, while the spellers laugtyed. The battle was a fierce one. Innocent after innocent floundered and fell on Pygmalion, crustacean, syncope and neurasthenia, until the line was reduced to Miss Summers on the one side, and Miss Adams on the other. "Aberration," called the pronouncer. "A-b-e-r-a-t-i-o-n," spelled Miss Summers, unthinkingly. "A-b-e-double rTa-t-i-o-n," Miss Adams -cried quickly, and Miss Summers sat down in great embarrassment, Then a sudden summons came for the triumphant Miss Adams and she was compelled to depart. A demand was made for a substitute, and the rosy Virginia Lee declared to be the only person in the room who had not succumbed. Strong objections were urged by the Adams side, but the referee insisted Miss Lee was the only one eligible, and, blushing, she faced the champion editor. The referee looked for something easy. "Giraffe," he called. "G-i-r-a-f," respqnded Miss Lee, while, everybody tittered and looked expectantly at t...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

i 3 & r H. i hfe - ; t, THE BOY WHO BECAME A KING ' ' Nowadays, when kings are almost a dead letter,' the average boy has a slim chance indeed of ever becoming a king. p Even the boys who are born to the king -business never feel quite certain any more that they will live to be kins that the crowns won't all be broken before they get a chance to wear them. And as for the boy with no royal blood in his veins, he has hardly any more chance of becoming a king than he has of getting a controlling interest in the New York Central railroad. Yet here is a boy of today, born in humble circumstances, who has taken a billion-to-one shot in the game of life and has won. He has made himself a king no great shakes of a king, perhaps, but still a king. The story of how this wandering boy became a king is as strangely romantic as the fact that crowns it. It is the story of how a 15-year-old lad ran away to sea, tramping from Hull to Liverpool to ship as cabin boy on a trawler; of how l...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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