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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 MOUNTAIN RECIPE The Editor's HOMEMADE SOUP While everyone likes different combinations of ingredients in soup and will argue from now on about it, everyone has to agree on one thing - EVERYONE loves homemade soup! Homemade soup is often at the center of fond childhood memories. Almost everyone associates a favorite soup as the "get well" prescription our mothers dosed us with. It was such a secure comfort when we were home sick from school to hear Mom bustling around in the kitchen preparing it, knowing we would be served (perhaps from a tray in bed) a meal that went beyond nourishment into tender loving care. For me that soup was potato soup; creamy white with a sprinkle of pepper and a big pat of butter melting on top. How could I have ever survived colds, flus and other childhood miseries without it? There were many economic advantages to soup also. Our mothers were very good at stretching a dollar. You could take a little bit of this, a litt...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. There is no telling where we might have lived and in far better houses if Papa hadn't set his head to educate his children. He stopped going to school in the third grade, but his children wouldn't. His judgement of renter-farmers was based on two things: "How close is it to church? What sort of schools will my children be going to if I move there?" Not many people knew that Papa was selfeducated and "wife-educated". • At our house it was an accepted fact that the husband was the head of the household, just as the Bible said, and Papa didn't let us forget that. Yet he allowed Mama to teach him addition, subtraction, division, multiplication and fractions what she believed was the principle knowledge needed to get along at the marketplace. Papa knew how to read and write, and he had mastered simple arithmetic before he married Mama ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 PAPA'S OBSESSION (Continued from page 7.) farm prices. He seemed to think it was right for him as the eldest child of a large family to stop going to school in the third grade, and start plowing a mule from sunup to sundown, and doing a man's work on the farm. If he ever played childhood games, we never knew about it. It seemed to us that he had always been "a man" but he was twenty-one before he became "a man of his own". On that birthday, his father gave him a mule, as was the custom in farm families. Our first school was at Macedonia, where they taught primer through the seventh grade. The schoolhouse had a bell-steeple, and the principal rang it to begin the day, and again for dismissal in the late afternoon. We carried lunches to school in tin lard pails. Whatever Mama cooked, she put in our pails —or buckets which was usually sausage or ham or buttered biscuits, and a baked sweet potato and sweetbread. The first sentence I learned to read ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

That long ago fall of 1954,1 was nine years old. I was in the fourth grade and doing well with my studies and classmates. As the days grew shorter and cooler and the leaves changed colors and fell, we all turned our thoughts to the next upcoming holiday, Thanksgiving. The windows at school were decorated with construction paper turkeys, pumpkins, pilgrims and Indians. I learned how to draw a cornucopia or "horn of plenty" that year and learned what it stood for. My little sister's first grade class was presenting a play and my mother worked on her sewing machine at night making the gray Priscilla Alden costume with the big white square collar and matching plain white cap. I remember my little sister's very curly hair puffing out on all sides when she pulled the strings of that cap tight and tied it under her chin. A big pumpkin sat in the kitchen floor awaiting the day my mother decided to prepare it for the pies she would bake to take to my grandparents' house on Thanksgiving day. ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 Do You Have Old Recipes To Share? Our grandmothers all seemed to have a way of making use of everything. They lived by the old adage, "Waste not, want not". Perhaps their set of values were instilled in them by their parents who grew up in the reconstruction period after the Civil War when times were indeed tough in the South. Every penny had to be squeezed just to survive. An abundance of food was not taken for granted and children were told over and over it was a sin to waste food. My mother told me that her mother said, Take one bite of meat and two bites of bread", meaning there was more bread than meat to feed the family. Another member of the family told of one winter surviving on practically nothing but flour and lard. "We had biscuits and water gravy", she told me, "and we made it". Thanks to our ancestors being the creative resourceful people they were, they found many ways of making simple foods very tasty. Many people have told me th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

John Scot Roach had a daughter named Nellie. She was a very beautiful woman, tall with a pretty head of wavy black hair. She married Virgil Lam and her second child was a strong handsome boy with hair like Mom and Dad, and his name was Gerald Allen Lam, born May 18,1915. The Blue Ridge Mountain children were considered some of the healthiest in the world. They overcame minor ailments easily. Crib death and Tuberculosis were the two most dreaded diseases until an outbreak of infantile paralysis about 1919 and Gerald Allen was stricken with this terrible disease. It left him cripple for life. His once strong body became thin, enlarged ankle joints three times the normal size and very weak wrists. He did manage to walk by himself in a very awkward way, swaying to control the weak joints with a wobbly balance. I believe life is somewhat like a great wrestling match, with determination, faith will power and suffering there is a counter for every hold, and any disappointment can be turned...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER. 1988 The Mail Box Dear Friends, I was fortunate in being given the November 1987 copy of your very interesting and informative publication. I have read it through a few times and find I can relate to many of the articles written by the local people. I am 70 years old and the oldest of ten children that my mother and father were blessed with. My youngest brother (the youngest child) was born in 1929.1 can well remember the Great Depression. After reading the copy I received I must subscribe also. Keep up this very interesting publication. Thanks, J. C. Baugham Richmond, Virginia Dear Mountain Laurel Folks, Yesterday I drove a lady home from the grocery store. We chatted all the way home and as she gathered her groceries to take inside she said she had something she felt I would enjoy reading as much as she did. This is the first I have ever heard of The Mountain Laurel. The issues she let me read are from 1986 and 1987.1 can hardly put them down. The...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

GENEALOGY ' GENEALOGY I need information on Rachel Graham who married Daniel Boothe in Montgomery County, Virginia on June 28, 1827. Daniel was the son of an early settler in this area, George Boothe. Daniel Boothe's first marriage was to Sarah Mc Alexander in Pactrick County, Virginia on May 24, 1805. They had 6 children. Rachel Graham was the second wife of Daniel Boothe. Their children were: Edith who married Robert Graham (my line); Rachel who married Miles; and maybe Asa who married Eliza Spangler. Daniel Boothe married his third wife, Susannah Hubbard in Patrick County, Virginia on December 27, 1836. Rachel Graham Boothe had a son by a previous marriage, Amos A. Graham who married Permillia Richards on November 7, 1848 in Floyd County, Virginia. I need information on Rachel's parents, her first husband and her children. Thank you for your help. Ed Graham 3347 Longhorn Rd. SW Roanoke, VA 24018 **4 Subscribe Today or * J^aurel Send a Friend a Gift to / The Mountain Laurel Monthl...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 STORY TELLER (Continued from page 11.) wood pile she found a note which said, 'You saw me coming, you gave me the saw, but you didn't see me saw.'" One of Gerald's Lewis Mountain tales went as follows: A small young man went to Elkton, Virginia and broke some small infractions of the law, and officers with a warrant came the 15 miles on horses to arrest him. The mountain people had much sympathy for the fellow, felt he was a good person who by.ignorance had made a slight mistake, and if he would hide a few times from the officers they would soon get tired of coming and forget all about it. One day the officers came in and he was in the living room. With plain furniture it was hard to hide. One lady told him to get down on his hands and knees and to pretend he was a bench so she could throw a spread over him and two of the children sat on him until the officers left. Another time he was in the kitchen when the officers came to call for him. The ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

This is a serialized, true story of a poor Ozark family in the 1930's through the eyes of one of their children. Experience their hardships and heart warming togetherness as they struggle through and celebrate life in the Ozark Mountains. In the summer of 1933 Mr. and Mrs. Reed wanted Alice to stay with Mrs. Reed for company after their daughter got married and moved to Missouri. Mama thought it would do Alice good for not only were the Reeds good Christian folks but Mrs. Reed was a refined lady and Mr. Reed was a pharmacist with college learning. So Alice was happy to go stay with them for she'd have money to buy new clothes with and get to make friends with some town people. Later, sometimes we'd see her in church and she'd be all dressed up in silk stockings and acting like the town ladies acted and even walked like them too. When she came home she would talk about how she and Mrs. Reed almost every day sat around and visited with the other town ladies drinking tea or lemonade or...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

' ' »♦ ♦ ' ' • • #» • ' « "7 • / •.. »#f/I .■r I / PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 OZARK DREAMS (Continued from page 15.) Tucker. We all broke up with laughter. He sang louder then he began to shout and got up on a chair and jumped off a few times. Then he preached awhile imitating Bro. Miller then, kneeling down like Widow Pollard he opened his mouth to pray but instead let out a hair raising scream as he looked toward the kitchen window. Finally Jeannie and Earl got him quieted down enough to understand what he was saying. He said a Gypsy was looking through the window at all of us. Every year or so some Gypsies would come through our parts. It was said they could steal people's watches or money right out of their pockets without anyone even knowing what was happening. Earl said a Gypsy perhaps knew about Papa's gold watch and toothpick that had belonged to his Papa. These two family valuables were kept in the wooden trunk along with the other things that had belonged to ou...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

UNCLE RICH (Continued from page 16.) back room to be counted later. About then, the preacher got up in the pulpit and smiled a big smile at Rich and turned to his congregation. 'Brothers and Sisters,' he began, 'we have with us today the Reverend Smith, a fellow laborer in the vineyards of the Lord. As you know, Brother Carroll was to be with us today, but he has shaken off this mortal coil and sits on the right hand of God even as we speak. Brother Smith, would you honor us with your message?' Rich swallowed real hard and got up to the pulpit. This was the sticky point in his plan. He had no idea what he would preach about. Now there happened to be a Bible laying open on the stand and Rich looked hard at the page of scripture, but nothing struck him as familiar. He turned page after page until, finally, he saw something that caught his eye. It was the story of David and Bathsheba, the wife of Uriah the Hittite. Now this was something that Rich could sure sink his teeth into." "And ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGEIB MOUNTAIN-LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 You see, I am a house, but I talk. People drive and walk by me and say, "Lookee yonder at that old house! Why don't they tear it down?" The last few years I've heard that statement so many times that I just sagged on down a little farther. I am a special house and want to share my life with you. Albert Hylton, with the help of friends and neighbors, built me in 1903. Mr. Jim Howell from down the road built my chimney, October 10,1903. The flat rocks have stayed perfectly in place all these years. Mr. Jim carved his initials and the date on a slab near the top of my chimney and is visible to this very day. Young marrieds, Albert and Dollie Hubbard Hylton moved in. I was so proud. They were such good people. Soon my rooms were filled with the cooing sounds of a tiny baby. Then more children came along until there were five: Ava, Elva, Stowell, Ray and baby Cleo. Laughter, sometimes crying echoed throughout my rooms. What a nice family! I just love...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

sitting room and sipped from the camphor bottle. Boy did she ever love that camphor and sugar! She still has the camphor bottle, but it's empty. I guess that's for the best since she loved sweetened camphor and whiskey so well. Ivalien enjoyed my fireplace doing homework by a crackling fire. She liked to eat frozen apples. They say frozen apples will kill you. That's bound to not be so for Ivalien would have died as a child. She would sit by my fire and read everything she could get her hands on. Dollie and Ivalien enjoyed my porch on late summer evenings. They sang hymns like Sweet By and By, and Bound For The Promised Land. In between songs, they listened to the little peep frogs in the swamp. Ivalien and all of Ray's kids were here a lot. They raced to see who would get to eat on the bench. The supper they enjoyed most was potatoes, boiled in their jackets in an old iron tea kettle, fresh printed butter, new green onions, and buttermilk. They would eat until I was sure they would...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

~t ■ - ~ ■ ...... , t > t* f •• f «»• - » r I was born July 17, 1924 on Lewis Mountain, centrally located in the Shenandoah National Park. Lewis Mountain gets its name from a surveyor from England named Thomas Lewis, who got the land from the King through a grant. He sold it to a Slaughter family who owned it for five generations and sold it to my grandfather, John Michelberry Roach for .500 per acre in the late 1800's. The Grainary was the largest industry in the Shenandoah Valley in the early 1900's, one was at Star Tannery, Brown Town, and Elkton, Virginia. Grandpa lived in a good mountain home on Lewis Mountain near Devils Ditch, with 90 acres of beautiful blue grass in one field on the east side of the house. He had enough men working for him in the spring of the year to peel enough chestnut oak bark to haul two loads per week for a year to the tannery at Elkton with a four mule team for $27.50 per cord. I believe with the special bark frames on the wagon, he could h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

Ridge Parkway only 25 minutes away. It is surrounded by Jefferson National Forest and Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, yet offers all the amenities necessary for a relaxed and enjoyable mountain visit.) We will exit 1-81 and 77 at Exit 22, following 1-77 North toward Bluefield, Virginia. 0.2 (0.2) We are now merging into 1-77. 1.0 (0.8) From the top of this ridge we are afforded a beautiful view directly ahead. Many of the mountains we see are a part of Jefferson National Forest. Interstate 77 has to be one of, if not the most, beautiful interstate highways in America. Much of it has very natural scenery and broad expanses of mountain ranges as far as the eye can see. 3.2 (2.2) We are now passing through a broad valley on 1-77. To our left and right we can see old farm places and rolling meadow land. 4J(1.5) Across the wide valley on our right we can see a small white church standing on a knoll in the distance. award for the single most spectacular sighting of fall leaf color ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER,.I9BB BACKROADS (Continued from page 21.) 29.1 (0.7) A beautiful old two story farmhouse with third floor dormers is across Clear Fork Creek to our right. 29.4 (0.3) We are now crossing another bridge over Clear Fork Creek. 29.9 (0.5) We are now crossing another bridge over Clear Fork Creek. 30.2 (0.3) Behind the old farm house on our left we can see meadows rising velvety green up the mountain side. There is an old apple orchard in the meadow and large round bales of hay are scattered beneath the apple trees. 30.8 (0.6) A panoramic view of the valley lies straight ahead. 31.9 (1.1) Here we cross Clear Fork Creek. After crossing the creek we are afforded a view of sheep grazing in one field, cattle grazing in another field, and the mountainside rising beyond them. It looks as if rivers of rock are running down the hollows from the mountainside. 33.1 (1.2) Nebo Church is on our left at this point* It is for sale by Lewis C. Hartsock, real estate broke...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

BACKROADS (Continued from page 22.) SW:$:%-.V. ■ ■v: • JiSiS S® i SSwSSS: m&i-'-'Miiil:. S&SV: W-iiSli* Wolf Creek Golf Club, mileage reading 47.6 49.8 (0.8) On our right is the brand new Wolf Creek Picnic Area of Jefferson National Forest. It is a perfect place for a family picnic with its tall trees and wide stream. 50.0 (0.2) On our right is the Appalachian Council of the Boy Scouts of America. There is a monument at its entrance that says, "In memorandum, James C. Acuff scout executive Appalachian Council, Inc. Boy Scouts of America, departed this life October 4, 1960. Served boyhood 28 years as a professional leader. Came to Bluefield March 1, 1940, retired July 1,1955. By ScoutTroopNumber 25." 50.1 (0.1) On our right is a beautiful pond which is part of the Scout facility. 50.6 (0.5) On our right, nestled among trees, is a rustic log cabin. 50.9 (0.3) Directly ahead is an exceptional panoramic view. Large meadows with scattered hay shocks are surrounded...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

eart ' f\ounfa??Zt JLaurel Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life A | NOVEMBERJjBB_ Volume 5 Number 4 $1.25 | PAGE 24 HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. "BACKROADp® "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hayrakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have never known polution. There's a part of our heritage on our backroads that no pen or camera will ever capture. There are cows...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 December 1988

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. Christmas at Papa's Place was a time of hope bursting out in full bloom. Whatever happened wouldn't stand in the way of celebrating Christmas. Mama's baking of sweet, spicy cakes was her first preparation for the festive season. In 1921, about the middle of December, she started worrying about eggs for the eight cakes she baked every Christmas. The hens were still laying an egg all along, but not an egg a day as each hen was expected to do, like they knew it was a season of merriment, and not much work of any kind going on. Every time a hen lighted in one of the partitioned cubicles of the long wooden box, overlooking Mama's milking stall just outside Brindle's stable, we would watch till she laid an egg. Then she would lift her dusty wings and stare at us with little beads of angry eyes, and fly back to the barnyard. About that t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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