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Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictori... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 12,797 items from Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Aerial Fight Over Thames: Duel With German Aviator [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Aerial Fight Over Thames: Duel With -German Aviator ' LONDON, December 30. An air battle has takep place over the Thames.. German airmen-there were two in one bi plane-the other afternoon carried out a daring raid, trusting to catch the English napping. Thanks to the vigilant watch on the Thames, however, this was defeated and the biplane had to take to flight. That it escaped the shrapnel of the anti-aircraft guns was due solely to thb mist which prevailed at in tervals. The biplane left Ostend at 10 a.m. and fol lowing the line of coast to Calais found the mouth of the Thames via Dover and then cross-country to Sheerness. It secms to have flown at a very great height above the clouds. The hostile craft was discovered hovering over Sheerness Jowards 1.30 p.m. When oar guns oesned fire the enemy was at a heighi of' about 4000 feet--w'l within range. Six shells were fired, and eye-witnesses are convinced, that the raider was winged by the second shell fired. At all events the machine...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NAVAL FIELD GUN. [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

THE NAVAL FIELD GUN. It is possible that many marines have been sent to Europe from England. Armed with their field guns, naval men wouil be of great value, but it is possible that the armored trains in use by the Allies are manned by British seamen with their 6in guns. The smallest naval field gun is just over 2lin, aad throws a 121b shell. When the South African war was fought the 4.7 and 6 inch guns were only in the experimental stage, but they performed great work. The former throws a 451b, and the latter a 1001b shell. Since then the 4.7in gun has been developed greatly as a field weapon, and is new mounted on a carriage to facilitate transport. The 6in gun on the armored trains is a naval weapon pure and simple, which would seem to substantiate my deduction that bluejackets are manning them.

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHRISTMAS IN THE FRENCH TRENCHES. [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

CHRISTMAS IN THE FRENCH TRENCHES. Two French soldiers are here seen opening Christmas boxes sent from home. For the most part these consisted of something uscfol--or eatab!r. --Copyright phctograph International Nets Searice.

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Our Economic Future: Official Efforts for Trade Expansion [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Our Economic Future: Official Efforts for Trade Expansion By G. T. M1ilne, F.R.G.S. (H.M. Trade Commissioner to Australia.) + His Majesty's Trade commissioner in Australia takes this opportunity of invit ing all who are interested in the import trade of Australia to make use of his office regarding sources of. sipply, agencies, and other matters in which it can help trade. within the Empire. How the office was ° established, the purposes it is intended to serve, what it has done and can do for the expansion of trade, together with the resources at its command, is told below in the Commissioner's own words. -A British Board of Trade and "Plantations" (as the Colonies were then called), was estab S lished by Charles II., in 1660, but in 1786 this body was superseded by a committee of the Privy Council on Trade, which developed into what we now know as the Board of Trade. The president of the Board of Trade is al ways a Cabinet Minister, who combines the functions of Minister for Comme...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW THE NAVY FARES IN WINTER. [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

HOW THE NAVY FARES IN WINTER. A unique photograph taken on board a British man-o'-war doing patrol duty. The whole of the statp is cover-d with snow. -Cpyright photogph Internpatinal Neas srrie.

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Herculean Task Now Facing the Allies [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

The Herculean Task Now Facing the Allies It is an axiom of war that to under-rate one's enemy leads to disaster. Yet it is an "aiom that has to be learned over and over again in the bitter school of experience. There is too good reason to suppose that Britain and her Allies have been for a long time mistaken in their views regarding the strength of Germany and her ability to hold out during a long war. We are constantly receiving reports by cable and mail alleging" the rapid "weakening" of our chief enemy in one direction and another. Only this week we hear that,pn desperate straits for copper, after despoiling Belgium of every scrap of that metal, it is now actually being proposed to melt down the bronze monuments of Germany itself. Again, "The Temps," the leading French newspaper, publishes extracts from official "Bulletins des Armees," dealing with the first four months of the war. The report concludes with the statement that Ger many has now "had to call up all her re sources. T...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Experiences of the Defence Force in South Africa [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Experiences of the Defence force n South Africa A letter giving a vivid picture of the early ex periences of the mounted troops of the South African defence force operating in the north of Cape Colony is printed in the Johannesburg 'Star." The writer says : "Some place, this! If this is not the abomi nation of desolation spoken of by the Prophet Daniel, then there must be two of them, and this is the one he had not heard about. They say there has not been a drop of rain for th?ee years, and I can quite believe it! Anyway, we got a shower last night, and it was about the best thing I have sampled in 'showers.' It was pre ceded by a dust-storm--also the best I have seen, felt, or tasted. But in spite of it all it was a sight I would not have missed-no doubt I'll soon tire of the phenomenon. It came from the west; they always do. In the middle was the inky blackness of the rain-clouds, with -the most wonderful lightning streaking in every direction, three and four flashes at one time, ...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Grappling with the Problem of Poverty [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Grappling with the Problem of Poverty * The "Sunday Times" Shilling War Fund is for the relief of cases of distress in families which have lost the aid of their breadwinner, absent on active ser vice. Those who have knowledge of cases in need of assistance should address their communications direct to the Editor, "Sunday Times," 136 Castlereagh-street, Sydney, or to Mr. A. W. Green, at the State Children's Relief Department, Rich mond Terrace, The Domain, Sydney. All communications will be treated with the utmost confidence, and every care will be taken to avoid undue pub licity as to the affairs of those in receipt of relief. "In reading the appeals of the distressed in the columns of the 'Sunday Times,'.one can not help but ask, 'Is the Gospel of Christ a truth or a fallacy ?' Personally, I believe it to be a truth. But where are the administrators of that Gospel, and how is it that all this dis tress and suffering remains among a people who profess and believe in the Lord Jesus C...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sorrow of the Nations: Ghastly Scenes that Deaden Senses [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Sorrow of the Nations: Gbastly Scenes that Deaden Senses The Place: France. The time: 1914. SNever was there a war like this. All is new, different from any that have ever preceded it. That which changes the physiognomy of the hattlefield is the employment of the trenches, i.where the combatants find a refuge and shelter ofrom the bullets and shells during days and ,veeks. This vast extent of ground seems at first .glance deserted. However, rumblings pass and the earth trembles. A whistling, very soft and fine, mingled with an ominous sonor ousness, strikes the air in every direction. Looking closely, one perceives on the ground in the distance some kind of lines, confusedly moving, and from which are sent out strident noises. Men, agile, supple, and resolute, advance stealthily and silently. They creep, they move awkwardly on hands and feet from a cluster of trees to a slope, from a hayrick to a ditch. :.'hey are armed with shields that protect them from the bullets. The inight len...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KAISER'S BAD INVESTMENT. [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

KAISER'S BAD INVESTM-TNT It is not generally knbown that the' capture of certain ships of the Woermann Line, re cently announced, was a direct blow at the pocket of the Emperor William. Until a few years ago: the. Woenmann Line wap a private enterprise of the Woermann family, but on the death of the head of the firm the business was turned, for family reasons, into a limited liability company. Still later a controlling interest was acquired by the Hamburg-America Company and the Kaiser himself, the.sum paid hbing a huge one. the Emperor investing a large portion of his savings in this very prosperous concern. He has now lost that proportion of his money hiVitI i8 rqpresented in the captured vessel.s afld also, it. is to be hoped,- the exclusive privi leger. which his line had for trading with whut have been German Colonies in Africa.

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

The Misery of Catarrh SIR JOSHUA BARTLETT'S BOOK (Explaining his new Treatment) The "HOME DOCTOR" sent FREE! Only those who suffer from Catarrh quently causing Catarrh of the stomach. know the misery of it. The blood inevitably becomes poisoned, Only those who are in Chronic state and the whole system suffers. The dis know that from simple Catarrh, which may have been caused by a commc. ease terminates in Asthma, Bronchitis, cold, they have contracted an appalling Consumption, or alJ of them. list of ailments which may lead to that It is probable that you have been div most dreaded of ALL diseases--Con- appointed with other methods'of treai sumption. meat. You may have spent a consider. Catarrh extends both upwards into able sum of money looking for a cure. the head and downwards into the sto- .:ou may have obtained relief, and mach. In the head it affects-the nose, then found your trouble come back the mouth, the throat, the breath, and with greater intensity thai, before, but the ...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AWAKE, PEOPLE TEUTONIC! [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

AWAKE, PEOPLE TEUTONIC ! (By MABEL OSGOOD WRIGHT.) Awake! ye People Teutonic. Awakel Avenge your lopt honor, Rent from your loins by a madman. Betrayed are ye by the sword kiss, Sold for the greed of your war-lords. Scarred is the soul of your country, BELGIUM Is branded upon it With \ineffaceable letters. Loathsome the deeds of your armies, Crimes of degenerate knowledge, Not the mere brute glut of carnage; Hellsh- the marks of their hatred. Shake off your grim twilight slumber, Lulled by the lies that enthrall you! #lelp lies not in kings,.but the humble Arise and stride forth a Republic! Hopefully thus we entreat you. WE, of the polyglot Nation, Smelted and welded by freedom, Rough-edged as yet from the forging Call, stretching full hands of pity, Shake off War's death-grip, O brothers! Stand man and woman together Equals, no bondage of body, For this alone shall redeem you. Death came by man in the dawning, By man also came resurrection; Birth comes to man, but through woman; Wo...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cutting up the Kaiser's Own [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Ctting up the Kaiser's Own From a British official at the battlefront comes the thrilling story of a desperate battle near Ypres, where the British and French al mostannihilated six regiments oi Germans. He says : "'Bearing a mn:.ange from our commander to the English general leading the troops in the region of Ypres, I reache% hi: headquarters at noon. The headquarters are in the open, in a beet field between two cno-moua stacks of straw. One hundred feet away a tottering farmhouse walls serves as ,ielter to my car. Accompanied by an officer of the Royal Service Corps, I crawl on all fours to another straw stack 300yds off, from which I am told the im pending battle can be seen. "On top of the stack an English batter, commander, speaking trucpct and glasses in hand, is directing the service of six field pieces. The trumpet is a necessity, for shells are burst ing 200 yards from the battery, and the noise, is deafening. "The Germans are slowly groping for the range, and in a few. mo...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Representative from the Vatican Arrives in Australia [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Representative from the Vatican Arrives in Australia SOne of the largest and most imposing R-oman Catholic ceremonies ever held in Aus tralia took place last week, on the occasion of the welcome to Sydney of the Papal dele gate, the Most Reverend Bonaventure Cerretti, Archbishop of Corinth, who was appointed by the late Pope, Pius X., to represent the Holy See in Australasia. The Papal delegate, with a party of dis tinguished prelates, Bishops and Archbishops, journeyed across the harbor by the Government stean:er Premier. As the vessel left the Cardinal's wharf, Manly, the flotilla of wel coming steamers gathered round her and escorted her to the city side. It was a picturesque sight. Each vessel was bedecked with flags and streamers bearing such inscriptions as "St. Mary's Cathedral greets Your Excellency" and the like. Throughout the short voyage whistles blew, bands played, and ,:owds cheered. Arrived at Fort Macquarie, a long procession was formed, with bands, Friendly Societie...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW THE BAYONET IS USED FOR OFFENCE AND DEFENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

HOW THE BAYONET IS USED FOR OFFENCE AND DEFENCE. 1-High parry; used in defence against a cavalryman, or from a man on a parapet. The fingers are protected by the leather gun sling.. 2-Thrust and lunge, in which the rifle is throven forward the full length of the arm, and then the bayonet is driven home. 3-Guard, or ready for anything., 4-Parry low, showing how a soldier defends himself against a swing at his legs. 5-Butt strike, or clubbing the enemy in the face with the rifle quickly thrown backward. 6-Parry low ; a quick downward sweep o. the bayonet to protect from a stroke on the left.

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Notes on the Naval Side of the War [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Notes on the Naval Side of the War - " ByR.N.R" DIFFICULTY OF TORPEDO FIRING. The Germans made a big mistake when they put a great number of torpedo tubes into their ships, because it is doubtful if they will ever get close enouga to use them. It is possible though that torpedoes erom" submarines and destroyers will play an important part. There is a great deal of difference between firing a big gun and a torpedo. In the case of the former, modern appliances to counteract the rolling of the ship help the gunlayer to a large extent--a factor that is absent in torpedo fire, and in connection with which a rolling motion Is detrimental The reason is because the tube containing the torpedo is set at the angle of fire, and there remains stationary. The sights are adjusted for deflection, caused by the speed of the two ships. It is here that the value of a specially-trained coxswain comes in--one who, by a skilfuli turn of his helm, can reduce the roll to a minimum, immediately he re ceive...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

YOUR HEIGIET INCRHEASED. WOULD YOEU LI'E TO DE TALLER I CAR INThEASE TOUR IICIGHT .SEVERALG INCISES No ugis:. No Appliances re used in the . IJSO. SYST3. ly, coue -.does no. in:effete with your ordinary bhbits,' .'nd only' require ten minutes of your time nihth and maruing All cor respondence le.-ln:7td.in:enrclo _-. - -iS 5 to. puyOt (fO p slg) fIo fll pltiun [.G. ~I GIBSON, . -DEPARTMENT "l." I"n PITT STRELT. SYDNE -

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Three Great Men Directing the Destinies of Russia [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

ThIe Thr6ee::ses G Irem ~eP~%yB ~i~criBg flt Dei~~ie~~ of R~ga The first thing that strikes one about the Grand Duke Nicholas, Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Armies, is his immense height. Tan next is'his modest, difildent manner. lie is "first and last and all the time" a soldiar. Among soldiers he is happy and at his ease. FPr other occupations and other people he has little interest to spare. Whee he received a party of journalists re cently, which the Russian Government stnt round some oi the Galician and Polish battle fields (writes Hamilton Fyfe in the "Daily Mail"), the hand which held the manuscript from which he read his little speech shok. Hie was very nerVous, and did not hide his relief when the ceremony ended. He showed marked courtesy, shaking hands all rounid both-.at the beginning. and at the finisli. But he has not the knack of being all things to all men. He might.not, perhaps, be eo velsiable.a soldier iif he had." ... When" he was given supreme cotnand of Russ...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN SNIPERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

GERMAN SNIPERS. In a letter to his mother;' Coporal J. J. Al brecht, 2nd Northamptonshire Regiment, re lates some interesting experiences. On one oc casion he was five days in one trench. "During that time, he says, "I did a bit of sniping, and accounted for seven Germans, who were often to be seen in the tree-tops, in one day. Some of them were.so hungry that they took it.in turns to .run from the flank of their trench to pull up some mangel-wurzels for dinner. We admired their audacity in attempting this dar ing feat, for we were only forty yards away, Iut-they never returned.". , :i . Corporal Albrecht tells how; our soldiers suf fer from. snipers, who get in the rear of the trenches. Often these snipers are dressed in British uniforms, and sometimes as French laborers. 'They carry," he says, i-'a ;tint short rife down the leg of their tronseyp, I lost a good few chums who were hit frode the rear by these men, one of -whom shot fropa,'hayloft as our fellows were filling their wat...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cold Steel Still the Deciding Factor in Many Fights [Newspaper Article] — The Globe and Sunday Times War Pictorial — 20 February 1915

Cold Steel Still the Deciding Factor in Many Fights "'You ought to have seen those Germans run away from our cold steel." This the burden ol many a typical Tommy Atkins' story of the fighting in France and Belgium. And, With 'little Rosalie' we drove the pickelhaubes oat of their trenches every time we coiulk get near enough," is.reiterated in many a French letter sent home by a valiant "piou-piou" to his adoring wife or sweetheart By whatever name they call it, the bayonet has come to be the deciding issue when a battle is fought to the finish. The Briton's "cold steel" and the Frenchman's "little Rosalie," as he dubs the long, sharp dagger at the end of his trusty rifle, has been called upon at the de cisive moment every time. This latter-day war has put the bayonet to the fore again, just when certain military autho rities had been telling us that cold steel has "haC its day," and that "wvith modern high powered rifles troops can never get close enough for hand-to-hand conflict."...

Publication Title: Globe And Sunday Times War Pictorial, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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