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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SHAVED HIMSELF. After he bad kissed her and pressed her rosy cheek against his and patted her soft, round chin, she drew back, and asked:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

SHAVED HIMSELF. After he had kissed her and pressed her rosy cheek against his and patted her soft, round chin, she drew back, and asked:— "George, do you shave yourself?" "Yes," he replied. "I thought so," she said. "Your face is the roughest I ever —" Then she stopped, but it was too late, and he went away with a cold, heavy lump in his breast.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FOOL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A FOOL. She: "Well, dear, after that you must acknow- ledge that you are a fool!" He: "I always knew it, darling; but—until I married you—I managed to keep it secret."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CURE FOR INSOMNIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

A CURE FOB INSOMNIA. —♦— It has been found that in most cases "that   insomnia is caused by disordered stomach,"   says an authority. Between the stomach and the   brain there is a close communion, and when one   is out of order the other is not only apt, but   is sure to be. Worry will unsettle the stomach   as indigestion will inflate the blood-vessels of   the brains. Recognising this, medical men are   now ordering the use of hot water internally   and externally. Before going to bed, the per-   sons so afflicted should bathe the feet in water   as hot as possible. This is for the purpose of   drawing the blood from the head, for when the   blood-vessels are inflated they press against the   skull, and fears, apprehensions, and dread of   going to sleep result.   &nb...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE TALLEST MAN IN THE BRITISH ARMY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

THE TALLEST MAN IN THE   BRITISH ARMY.   —♦— Captain W. H. P. Gill, with his 6ft. 9in. of   stalwart manhood, is the tallest man in the Bri-   tish army. He even dwarfs those historic giants   of military pageant, Major Barnes, who read the   proclamation of Queen Victoria as Empress of   India, at the Imperial Durbar, at Delhi, and Cap-   tain Ames, 2nd. Life Guards, who headed the   Diamond Jubilee procession in 1897. Captain Gill   belongs to the 65th (Leicestershire) Company of Yeomanry, and has just returned from active ser-   vice in South Africa.—   —"Army and Navy."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRINCELY BENEFACTIONS. AN INTERESTING LIST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

PRINCELY BENEFACTIONS. AN INTERESTING LIST. Sir Ernest Cassel's recent munificent gift to the King and the devotion of the money to the crusade against consumption have aroused the keenest interest throughout Great Britain. The London morning newspapers, before the name of the donor was announced, contained many ingenious guesses at his identity, and it was curious to observe that not one of the guess- ers mentioned the name of Sir Ernest Cassel. The names most in favor were:— The Duke of Devonshire Lord Iveagh Sir Thomas Lipton Mr. Cecil Rhodes Mr. Pierpont Morgan Mr. Andrew Carnegie Mr. W. W. Astor Mr. Passmore Ed- wards. Many princely benefactions have been made in recent years for the benefit of the poor and the sick. Among the most notable of those pre- sented, during the lives of the donors were the following:— £2,000.000 was the sum given by Mr. Andrew Car- negie in June of last year under deed of trust for the cause of education in Scotland. £700,000 was spent upon Holloway ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JAPAN'S PRIMITIVE FIRE BRIGADE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

JAPAN'S PRIMITIVE FIRE BRIGADE. Japanese dwellings, being of the flimsiest kind, are peculiarly subject to attack from fire. Yet, except in the largest coast towns, the means for coping with conflagrations can hardly be called advanced. They are, indeed, wofully inefficient. Hand engines that can be carried by two men, A PRIMITIVE OUTFIT. and buckets, comprise the whole outfit. Valu- ables, therefore, are not kept in the dwellings. In every village there is a massive tower, with iron doors and window shutters, and in this building the inhabitants store whatever they possess of value to save it from the contingency of loss by fire. These were the first "safe de- posits."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INDEFINITE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

INDEFINITE. Collector: "Mr. Hangback promised he would certainly pay up by the first of the year." Business Man; "H'm, did he specify what   year?"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
For Woman's Eye. ROLLED BATTER PUDDING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

For Woman's Eye. ROLLED BATTER PUDDING. Put half a pound of flour into a large basin, make a well in the centre, into this break three eggs, sprinkle with a pinch of salt, and gradually add a pint of milk till the batter is perfectly smooth and like a thick cream. Let it stand for an hour, then sprinkle in a teaspoonful of baking powder, pour into a greased Yorkshire pudding tin, and bake in a sharp oven. As soon as it is baked turn it out on a sheet of paper, thickly cover with castor sugar, spread the under side with warmed jam. make into a neat roll, and serve at once. —O—  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BUN LOAF. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

BUN LOAF. For each pound of bread dough allow three ounces of sugar, two ounces lard, or clarified drip- ping, slightly melted, four ounces of currants, one ounce of candied peel, and one egg. Work the lard into the dough, then the other ingredi- ents, the currants last of all. Set the whole in a greased tin, let it rise again, and bake as for bread. —O—  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO CLEAN SAUCEPANS EASILY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TO CLEAN SAUCEPANS EASILY. Fill each saucepan directly it is used with water, add a pinch of borax, and set at the back of the stove to heat slowly. The washing up after this is really nothing, for the warm water and borax are so cleansing. For baking cakes for any special occasion al- ways choose old tins, as they are better than new.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TREATMENT OF KID BOOTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TREATMENT OF KID BOOTS. Tear off a strip of new flannel the width of the material, and about four inches across. Roll this strip very tightly round and round, and sew it together so that it will not open. Be sure to make it quite even at the hairy end, and on this apply three or four drops of best black ink and one or two of fine olive oil. Gently dab the leather with the wad, and rub with it till dry.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLUBS ARE TRUMPS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

CLUBS ARE TRUMPS. The ladies of Perinton, U.S.A., we are told, have determined to control their husbands who play at the club too late. They have, therefore, formed a club of their own, and have leased the premises over the men's club. Each lady has a brass check bearing her husband's initials, and when she wants to go home she drops the check in a slot whence it falls down into the men's club below. Fortunately, most London clubs of repute possess the whole building in which they are located, or a new terror would be added to life. Fancy the feelings of the frequenters of the Athenaeum if the ladies were known to be over- head, keeping brazen checks upon the behaviour of their too frisky spouses! It is surely well that there is one place secured from the intrusion of Mrs. Proudie, where even a bishop may be at rest!

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOME WOMEN TALKERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

SOME WOMEN TALKERS. There are many brilliant conversationalists in the world of London. Consuelo Duchess of Man- chester can fleet three hours as surely as fairies fleet them in the magic world. Mrs. Asquith—the Margot Tennant of old days—proves a happy ad- dition to the smartest dinner; she has the bright- ness and quickness of a bird, much ready wit, and an acute sense of criticism. Mrs. Murray Guth- rie, daughter of Sir John and Lady Constance Leslie, is the gayest of talkers, with an endless store of amusing anecdotes; and Mrs. Willie James is one of the few young married women who can be termed a genuine wit. She has a power of repartee, the uncommon gift of epi- gram, and is also an accomplished mimic. Queen Alexandra has honored Mrs. James with her friendship in a marked manner, and as Princess of Wales stayed at West Dean Park, Mr. and Mrs. James' beautiful place near Chichester. This visit, by the by, was a sign of exceptional favor, as throughout her married life the Queen...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.   "C.S."—Contributions, to be accepted, must be   original, or from some rare book or MSS., not   from current periodicals.   "Saxony."—Last effort seems to be resur-   rected items; at any rate, they don't bear the   stamp of originality.   "Old-age Pensioner."—Idea of acrostic very   good; hardly worked out satisfactorily; try   again.   "J.M.L."—"Snaiks" too long; briefer edition   would take.   "J.C.B."—"Drifting or Steering" not suitable   for these columns; would probably do for a de-   nominational journal.   "J. M. Rogers."—Your efforts are very credit-   able, but the work is not quite up to the "pub-   lication" standard.   "Phil."—"Village Maiden" wants more touch-   ing-up; idea for joke may be used. &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT AN OPERA HOUSE WOULD COST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

WHAT AN OPERA HOUSE WOULD COST. Dr. Villiers Stanford has been giving his views on the question of an English Opera House, in connection with Lord Dysart's offer of £10,000, to a "Westminster" interviewer. Pro- fessor Stanford was very emphatic on the point of the cost of the proposed building. "Five hundred thousand pounds is a ridiculously large sum," he said; "£250,000, or at most £300,000, would be quite sufficient for the purpose. What is wanted is not a house with marble foyers, but a house with a first-rate stage and very com- fortable seating arrangements. The Deutscher Theater at Prague is the sort of thing we want. It stands by itself, and is exceedingly pretty. It only cost £100,000, and I do not think that such a theatre would cost in England more than £150,000. Fifty thousand pounds, more would keep it going at the rate of £10,000 a year for five years. I am calculating this on the basis of the Opera House at Brussels, where they get a subvention of £10,000 a year, but ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FROM THE NURSERY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

FROM THE NURSERY.   Lady (who is entertaining her little son's   playmate, aged five, to dinner): "Willie, can   you cut your own meat?"   Willie (who is struggling with a piece on his   plate): "Yes, thank you (with a desperate saw   at the beef), I've cut twice as tough meat as   this at home."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
[?]THE ISLANDERS." AUSTRALIA'S REPLY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

"THE ISLANDERS." AUSTRALIA'S REPLY.   Mr. Rudyard Kipling, in "The Times," has cast a slight on the younger nations, writes Dr. W. Monro-Anderson, the well-known Australian poet, to the London "Express." Our fighting men do not serve a fawning people. Australians owed a debt to England, and what they have done they have done of their own accord. Australia would have sullied her good name if she had served a nation that fawned on her. We know our history too well to believe that England has sunk to the level ascribed by Mr. Kipling. Lord of the loud-lunged legions! Prince of the Purple Press! Are we but pigmy people Lost in the wilderness, That we of the Younger Nations Should call back our fighting men. At the blast of your tin war trumpet. Or the scrawl of your scathing pen? Safe in your inky dug-out. Flinging your gibes about. What do you know of England, Or the quest that brought us out? We of the Younger Nations, Reared on the range and plain, Scornful out of the ba...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOUNDED OVER A PIT. STAG AND HOUNDS FALL 100 FEET WITH TERRIBLE RESULTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

HOUNDED OVER A PIT.     STAG AND HOUNDS FALL 100 FEET WITH TERRIBLE RESULTS. The Arundel correspondent of the "Morning Leader" telegraphs that an extraordinary mishap occurred there in the course of a run with the South Coast Staghounds, under Mr. Kay, the master. The meet was at Whiteway's Lodge, Arundel Park, and thence there was a smart run to Amberley, where the hounds got bogged in Am-   berley Brooks. They managed to get out without   hurt, and quickly and smartly headed back the   stag, and were fast gaining on him, when the   animal blindly went right over Houghton Chalk   Pit, outside the park.   The hounds, 10 couples in all, following im-   petuously, also went over the pit, except a   couple and a half.   Stag and hounds fell quite a hundred feet,   with terrible results. The stag broke his neck,   being ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO CLEAN INCANDESCENT BURNERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

TO CLEAN INCANDESCENT   BURNERS. Messrs. E. Goldstraw and Co., Theatre-cham-   bers, Babington-lane, Derby, England, are the   patentees of an apparatus for cleansing the   mantles of incandescent burners without remov-   ing them from the gas jet. It consists of a   rubber bulb, to which is attached a length of   tubing having at the end a clip, which is grasped     round the burner, as shown In the illustration.   The pressure of the bulb forces air through the   air-holes of the burner, and removes all dust from   the mantle without endangering the gauze. The   advantage of the device is that it obviates the   necessity for removing glasses, mantles, or globes,   and increases the lighting power of the burner   simply by keeping it clean.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES, ETC. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 22 February 1902

OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES, ETC. Mamma: "You musn't bowl your hoop in the front on Sunday. You must go into the back garden." Tommy: "Isn't it Sunday in the back garden, mamma?" —London "Punch." A witty lady says: "It you want to find out a man's real disposition, take him when he's wet and hungry. If he is amiable then, dry him and fill him up, and you have an angel."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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