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Elephind.com contains 66,464 items from Day Book, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

WSSfS2i BT-SFJSjfSS ir'flWi 'Jjo-"" piiiHiiii'wwei CYNTHIA GREY'S DAILY CORRESPONDENCE I am a youngs woman. I have been married four years, but have no children. I love my husband dearly, but I feel that' he does not care for me. He is at home with me evenings, but there is a part of his days that I do not know about. Recently I heard something about him' and when I asked him about.it he denied at first, but later admitted it. How can I get him to love me again? A Reader. A. : If your husband does not love you, why did he marry you? Of course he loves you. Don't imagine thingsand accuse him men have "been driven to wrong in just this way. And above all don't listen to tales others bring to you about your husband. None but a tale-bearer and mischiefmaker would go to a wife with tales about her husband, and such people should be positively discouraged, and forbidden the house. Try to b ehappy just believe that your husband does love you, and remember that if anyone were to come to him...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

f t -Mvgql ADOLF PASSES A POOR THING ALONG r i ' a mmm 1 ''what me YOU STRING S gg at, you 1 0S vot Wre Ypo A ?AWKIH? AT, J YOU OS3e ' LOAFER.?" T HtfiMfSiMHHAliM 1 .-. '

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

PS53jMt;qEywnVtfi4lB ' if ' ' " ' i o 0 THE RULE By Berton Braley. Say, is this thing right? Or is this thing wrong? Is the bond toe- slight? IsNthe chain too strong? Shall I keep on straight? 'SHall" I turn the Berids? "Well, I can't just state Forit all depends !" Shall I wed or not? Shall I, stay or "blow"? Shall. I buy that lot? Shall I let it go? Shall I" wait and see What my fortuhe sends? Can't you answer me? 'Well, it all depends r "What is good one day May be wrong the next v And your life's longvway Will be sore perplexed, And there's just one rule That the code extends To the wise or fool Well, it all depends!" Dost recall those days of boyhood When you swdrev those twopiece suits ; - And behind the barn sequestered Smoked those corn-silk ciga-roots? Great Britain manufactured 1,400,000 bicycles in "1911 Enough to dotfiat job of Wheeling, West Virginia. Do your wishing with your hands as well as with your heart. iiiiliiillllllllll

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

MEnHaHHH imtmsm swss " THE DAILY SHORT STORY j4 His Lordship. - "If I were a man," declared 'Molly with intense conviction, STd be a reporter and nothing else. Billy, aren't you glad you're poor?" ' "Well, I suppose one could be a reporter and have money, tpo," suggested Billy, "although I never heard of one. It isn't all beer and skittles, though. Evans, the city editor, told me today he wasn't satisfied, and that if I didn't make good on this Kilmartyn assignment, he wouldn't answer for what would happen." "Do you mean Lord Kilmartyn?" asked Miss Benson. "Yes. The one they say is following an American heiress everybody is guessing about. Do you know hun?" "We met him last year in Scotland," replied Molly, looking the other way. "What do you mean by 'making good' with him?" "Mainly finding out the name of the girl," said Billy. Then they talked of other things. His lordship arrived on schedule time and proved the same enigma the London correspondents had found him. Billy Anderson, ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

33ip$ "- J-ffchsHW-WlW? the. future Lady Kilmartyn re sided. There was Molly's house, and yes, there was Molly herself coming down the front steps. Heartsick at the sight of her beauty and what it meant to him now it was lost, he was about to turn down a side street, when she beckoned. Of course there was nothing to do but join her and walk by her side. She did not keep him long in suspense. "Did.he tell you?" she asked.' "Yes." - "And What did that bear of a city editor say?" T "Oh, he was delighted. And of, course I am, too. I conratulate .you, JVliss- .Benson, i nat is, or course I congratulate his lordship." . r "It will be a fine 'scoop' won't it? And there'll be another foe you when it is broken off." "Broken what?" gasped Billy. "I said 'broken off,'!' replied Miss. Benson calmly. "Goodness? Billy, you don't suppose I really mean to marry him? I just wants ed to.give you a chance to- 'make good' 'as you call it, with your, paper." i AMERICAN GROUND IN JPERSIA , CC ":Uj . f. t...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

zmmmmmmgmm - -m THREE WAYS TOCOOK c ROUNDSTEAK .' Beef En Casserole Cut into small pieces, 2 pounds round steak, dredge each piece with flour. Fry until slightly brown in'l tablespoonful of fat or butter. Slice thin 1 small onion and mix with beef seasoned with salt, pepper, paprika and celery seeds. 'Add I well-beaten egg and Y cup bread crumbs. Stir thoroughly and put into casserole. Pour over it z pint of boiling water. Sprinkle with bread crumbs and place across top 2 or 3 small thin bits bacon. Steam 3 hours and serve in casserole with tomato sauce, t Beef Pudding Chop sufficient cold round steak to make pint. Boil 4 dunces spaghetti 20 minutes; then drain. Peel two goodsized tomatoes and cut into bits. Put layer of spaghetti in bottom ef baking dish, then layer of chopped beef, then layer of tomatoes, net dusting of salt and pepped, then another layer of spaghetti, until all ingredients are used, having last layer tomatoes. Cover this with fine breadcrumbs, dot here and there ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

mmmmmmt vTT ' n f" " Jr&!Zrr CHICAGO DOINGS BRIEFLY TOLD Dr. James H. Lyons, who examined the body of Charles B. Morrow, said dead man might have inflicted wounds that resulted fatally. Ten women, at a tea given yesterday by Mrs. B. Morrow, charged by the police with murdering her husband, subscribed $1,000 for her defense. Police claim their case is growing stronger. Mass of ice and snow fell ten stories in City and County building early this morning, and crashed through glass roof over water office. Several people narrowly escaped injury, and heavy damage was caused. Inspector P. D. O'Brien of the first division is confined to hisJ home with an attack of pneumonia. That first division doesn't seem to be a very healthful 'place for police officials lately. Edmund T. Burton, South Side "L" guard, dropped dead today while returning to his home, 6646 S. Sangammon. Death believed to have been caused bv cold. Dr. C. H. McElfresh, Springfield, 111., found unconscious and free...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

wmmmmmmm, f ,MHnFr 3wJMfTTW"i'" rV ffi f and probably fatally wounded by detective while trying to break into 1958 Fulton street. Ollie Olson, 34 W. North ave., found slugged and robbed in front of 1431 W. North ave., early today. A peculiar hole in the rubber heel of one of his shoes led to the arrest of Ishmond Denny, a janitor, as a thief, and the recovery of $450 loot. The Wertz Family Association of America has decided to send two members to Hamburg to start suit against Germany for the Sl5,O0Q,00O estate of the late Field Marshal Paul Wertz. Jewell Bernaur, 2, 233 W. Lake street, burned to death hy coals from a heating stove. Adolph Sterling, 4120 N. Cfcuremontj robbed of $12 by two Bandits at North Leavitt and Cornelia street. Mary Scafura, infant daughter of Charles Scafura, 765 Forquer street."burned to death by coals from heating stove. Mrs. Anna Johnson, 635 Bunk er street, beaten in her home byl three men. Her screams frightened them away. Samuel Oliss, proprietor of tai...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

WIVES OF CHICAGO BO YOU LOVE YOUR HUSBANDS TOO MUCH? imim K B? jBbt' 1 Mrs. Albert G. Wheeler, Jr. New 'York, Jan. 8. ''The I my husband too much; that I whole trouble' was that I loved fairly worshipped him and that r i 1 MfcA,'. . - AJJi

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

xtmmmmmBm ftSpKS I was content to 'look upon oui home as our world." This statement comes from ""Mrs. Albert G. Wheeler, jr., once noted as "the prettiest girl on Broadway," who claims she was deserted in 1910 by her millionaire husband and is now contesting his attempt to reduce her temporary alimony from $500 to $100 a month. ' "Oh, I loved him as few women have ever loved before," said Mrs. Wheeler. "He was everything to me. And when another woman an older one came between us, I never awoke to the situation until' everybody else knew about it. lK trusted him so much that I could hardly believe even after I knew." Mrs. Wheeler still retains the beauty that made her the talk of Broadway in the 90's. She is the daughter of Axel B. Carlstedt, former director of the Boston Conservatory of Music. I o o At South Bend, Ind., Jacob LuskatSvas cold and helped himself to 25 cents worth of coal on the Grand Trunk railroad tracks. He was tried, convicted and promptly sent to ail. HowEncouragi...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

m A FAIR IDEA OF COURT DIGNITY Judge Hortore in the Criminal Court on January 4, gave the people a pretty fair idea of what constituted court dignity or American lese-majesty. , Miss Hazel Hogan had declined to testify against Dr.1 Ivrine Sissinger, who, with three other men, she had accused of robbing her of $1,756. v ' . Judge Honore had sent her to jail for contempt of court on the day previous, but her story in the cell only seemed to make her more determined. "Do you refuse to testify or do you refuse to accept what? is known in law as an affirmation ?" asked Judge Honore when the woman-was brought before him "I refuse to testify or to answer any questions," replied Miss Hogan.- "You can do whatever you please with me, but I will never take an oath." "I refuse to be bullied into anything. I will go to the county jail or even to the penitentiary before I will testify in this case. ''The .court has no right to make me 'swear to things." "You will be remanded7 to the county jail u...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

---,-,,-, , ,33 miii3fWiFf - gf4m&&!gfct' Mjjtyig9By the world of their own acquaintances suddenly. The police say that not more than half the actual disappearances are reported." Let the ruffled dignity of a "court, outraged by refusal of a -o- little woman to 'answer- the court's bullying, be turned from the small offender and let it looseon the bigger fellows whose silence may cost Chicago many a future heart ache. NEITHER THIRD NOR SHORTSTOB BUT CATCHING IS HARDEST JOB , By Billy Evans. For years third base has been considered the hardest position on the diamond to play. It was commonly referred to as the "difficult corner." Lately sentiment has changed and shortstop is regarded ,as a harder position than third base. It is conceded that the players filling third base and shortstop roles have their hands full. There is one position, however, that is looked upon by the profession as harder to fill acceptably than either third or short the backstop job. The ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

WORKMAN KILLED AND STATE, UNDER NEW LAW, PROTECTS THIS WIDOW FOR LIFE Seattle, , Wash., Jan. 8. Pensioned for life. That's what the workman's compensation law is Mrs Regina Hopken. doing for Regina Hopken, 2013 Eighth aye'., Seattle, the first person 'in the 'state of Washington to "become a beneficiary of the state industrial insurance, which went into effect on Oct. 1. On Oct. 11, George Hopken, her husband, was overcome with gas fumes at the Seattle Gas and Lighting Co.'s plant, and in falling, fractured his skull. He died in one hour. Two weeks later the widow received word that the state industrial commission had adjudicated her claim. She is to receive $25 a month as long as she lives unless she remarries Her- 15-year-old sbn, Carl, will get $5 a month until he attains" majority. This widow has had no endless lawsuits "to fight. She didn't need a lawyer to fight her personal injury suit for her. There were no appeals to drag iier case on for; years. ' .Her grief is still fresh...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

"Jii)tftfrllVijiliMlL' jpy i jr -f wrixiTjrjf jniifSBffj lfliSfiWS? ,!$5'S3iP? "W"B make the compensation a lump sum, the payments in cases of death not to exceed $4,000. The life pension system, hqwever, will be allowed in most cases. "How did they decorate the walls of that famous Russian ice palace?" "I suppose with some sort of a frieze." Baltimore American. it- -a o- WILSON, LOGICAL CANDIDATE FOR DEMOCRATS, SAYS. SENATOR GORE By William E. Smythe. Washington, Jan. 8. The Jackson day celebration was planned as a love feast. It will be such outwardly, but inwardly it will be a council of war. Six weeks ago the democrats thought they would be called upon to confront a conservative republican party with President Taft at its head. But the surprising development of the progressive' movement in the last few weeks has changed the situation completely and shattered the democratic dream of sure and easy victory. The leaders have suddenly awakened to the fact that they have been living i...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

foday." . m ' Many other prominent democrats express themselves frankly in private conversation wjth the understanding that they shall not be quoted until they have had the chance to recover their breath after the unexpected Mevelopments. on the republican side. Opinion is divided between two well defined view. The one most commonly expressed is in substantial accord with Senator Gore's opinion. The idea is that progressive action on the part of the republicans would drive the democrats into the same position, " pnly a little more so. Wilson or Bryan. The nomination of Wilsdn or Bryan is predicted by those holding this view. Several think that the same psychological condition which has brought Roosevelt into renewed prominence among republicans will revive" the popularity of the "Peerless Leader" among democrats. It is definitely known that Bryan wijl not decline if the party callst The other view, held by some bf the shrewdest politicians, is that the nomination of La Follette or R...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

EKIWBgwwq PACKERS KEPT UP POOL DESPITE" COURT ORDER Grosscup's Injunction Don't Enjoin Beef Barons Changed Meeting Place. x Further evidence of the high respect paid by the millionaire packers to orders of the courts was given at their trial today. "Jerry" Pratt testified that af-tc-i Judge Grosscup issued a restraining order against the beef barons holding "pool meetings," the defendants indulged in little weekly gatherings at the homes of Meeker, Swift and others. "Jerry" Pratt Jerry is the pet name of the packers for the witness is in a position to know whereof he speaks. At ihe time in question 1902 he was manager of the beef department of Armour & Company, and as such himself attended the meetings. The government is jubilant. Pratt's testimony goes far to uphold the conspiracy charge, and also gives the lie to the oft-reiterated itatement of the packers and their attorneys that "P. O. Box 2A7V and all its works became deceased in 1902. In 1902, it was proven before ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

$ions on the margins of the sheets and it was for this "reason that Judge Carpenter refused 'to permit the introduction, of the notajtio.ns as evidence. The government investigation into the peculiarities of William D. Miles, former head of the Kansas City branch of Armour & Company, who gave damaging evidence jigainst the packers before the 'grand jury, and repudiated that evidence in Judge Carpenter's court, is progressing. The government has discovered that.Miles has been in possession of certain evidence against the packers for a long time, .and that' as late as 1910, he willingly submitted this evidence to Governor Stubbs, of Kansas. Governor Stubbs refuses to idiscuss thenature of the evidence which Miles submitted to him "because of the possible perjury charges that may be instituted against Miles by the government." But the government attorneys are extremely curious to know just what caused the extraordinary change in Miles' testimony, and, it is said, the whole ...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 8 January 1912

iffJtSgjflWMIg11 &?M 'iZ'rwwsr P( 4 ,r year-Qjd $qn Robert Hastings"' heir to $1 ,000,000 from the estate of 'hisfgrandioiher, in IKfetemple oj iKesunwQrsiipper;. T'te Rea? kii7iboyJs a cousin ofi Billy "Iirndsa " ' ' ' ' '. -. Bj& father and mothe.rarjbsiep,:. Tfie be'Iief tharTthe Eind-sa boyis kep't'in'h!ding'in!Gh!ca.go "grew out" m ! information-' given by as(6mahXt lining"' Hftar the JEJanish temple at 301-6 Lake-IPark ave. The in.forma'nt'. told-;of haying se'dri'anvinHEUi'and'boy step out of a'taSdcafo iiVfro'rk'of a'house occu- mm mmm , -jiz, One of the aunts trying to recover 2-year-old Billy, Lindsay. arated. T,he father said 'he believed that Mrs. Alma Ricker-whq testified in the -Juvenile court, ;was4 frist former wife, and" said ,his intention in coming to Chicago was to remove the boy from Hanrsh's influence if he found him living:in pne of the Mazdauan temples. Billy Lindsay. pied 'by members of the cult and disappear behind its .doors. Both w...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

5 305 THE DAY &00K 500 SO. PEORIA ST. 398 TEL. MONROE 353 Vol. 1, No. 89 Chicago, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1912 One Cent SEVEN DEAD IN FIRE THAT THREATENED TO WIPE OUT HEART; OF NEW. YORK Heroism Marks Work of "Smoke Eaters" Scorched by .Flames, Drenched in freezing Water, as Equitable " Building Crashes Into Ruins j worn thjit the Equitable, Building itself, now a total loss, cost ?I8,7jr,640 to' build, t and had a jook" value of $15,510,060.-, The loss tb"the"tenants'of the building" will be immense,-but until, the great vaults are openedrno idea of the. amount of this loss can be come to. . "Wall ,Streetr cut" off .bythe -fire lines," was .paralyzed today, and business all throughout the fjnan- , cial section ,was reduced to ipractically nothing. ' , . At 2:45 this afternoon, Fire Chief Kenlon ordered rescuing parties within the wavering-Walls of the buildup. He took this action' on reports from persons who worked in the "building, and from whose stories he' now estimates the...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Day Book — 9 January 1912

"ffiw9q&gtr flames spread like lightning, and ' Before the first firemen arrived from sixblocks away, the entire building was burning fiercely, eyery floor was on fire, and flames were shooting from hundreds of windows in each of the four sides. Three sides of the buliding were bounded by streets that elsewhere would be called alleys. Rising on all sides were immense sky-scrapers. Even if they stood with their backs against the buildings on the opposite sides of the streets, the firemen were forced to approach within thirty feet of the inferno that raged about them. , Alarm followed alarm, until three thousand firemen were fighting and suffering. Flarfies rose, and billowed hundreds of feet in the air, cutting surrounding sky-scrapers in a frame of dull, wicked-looking red. As the morning progressed, hundreds of thousands of men and women employed in the financial district, began disgorging from subway, elevated and surface lines. They tried to force through the fire lin...

Publication Title: Day Book, The
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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