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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

138 MEXICO AND THE MEXICANS. rect these misconceptions, in a measure, and show Mexi can home-life as it really exists. It is now seen that, except among the lower classes, a virtue, intelligence and refinement exists that is actually superior to that of our own country that the Mexican wife is a model wife and a model mother; that at the theatre, the ball, the church, the Mexican young lady does not smoke cigarettes, as she has been painted ; that life with her does not consist of a sad melange of church going and intrigue, as the Foreign Mission Reports indicate, but that she is truly pious, gentle, generous and happy. It is needlessto say that she is attractive. The Mission Reports in variably admit that the Spanish blood Mexican young woman is beautiful. Neither is she ignorant. The peon population, it is true, has, in general attained no higher degree of culture, but the great majority of upper class Mexicans could enlighten not a few of our public school "professors" on many su...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

It , THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 139 and found them crying aloud for admittance. They had been discovered and brought over by polite Mr. Howells and other realistic worthies. Scarcely had we taken these on trust, un til another mighty critic dragged up the Dutch sensitivists from Holland, and paraded them before us. Will anyone ever discover that Mexico has a literature of its own? We cannot tell. Mexico is a Catholic country. It is bitter to say, but ample experience proves that a Protestant critic will not discover a Catholic literator. Spain is now being discov ered, but the writers are not Catholic writers, whatever they may be in religion. Just why we Catholics in "the States" cannot have a Catholic critic who will have sufficient intellect ual courage to discover his own in literature, wherever exist ent', is past comprehension. Thus, whether we ever learn of them or not, it is a singular fact that Mexico has now a litera ture of her own. She has produced several poets and nov elists...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

T 140 MEXICO AND THE MEXICANS. of the South. With the most picturesque and beautiful land scape on the continent, our sister-republic has not been'slow to use her advantage. Besides, she has had the Church to en courage the artist, and the Church has, in all ages and clim ates, been' the Mother of Art and encourager of beauty. In the United States we have no artist who has been thought worthy the title of "the Michael Angelo of America." Across the border they have a "Michael Angelo of Mexico" Fran cesco Tresquerras. Solome Pina has won the highest prize at Rome with one of his paintings. Parra, another Mexican painter is considered one of the great artists of the world. It is strange to be so told, but Mexico has produced nearly fifty painters of international distinction; yet we never hear of her in the world of art. In other respects, she has any number of producers of carved crucifixes, designers in clay and wax, art pottery, embroidery, etc., etc., nearly all of which is the wo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 141 roses and devotion. Bayard Taylor, disposed as he was to misrepresent the religious side of life in Catholic countries, was affected by the devotion apparent in the Mexico of his time. In his "California and Mexico," he describes "a sacred dramatic spectacle a representation sanctioned by the relig ious teachers of the people" which, having then been through Spain, he might truthfully have said was an ancient custom imported from the mother-country, and evolved from the rich genius of Calderon, Lope de Vega, Murrillo and Zurbaran. In Mexico the arrangement, or setting, was necessarily very simple. A rude bower of cane leaves, upon a large platform in the open air, a large tinsel star gleaming far down the plaza, where a multitude stood expectant. Suddenly from the lower end of .the village San Lionel emerged a strange pro cession. First came the three Holy Kings (or wise men) fol lowed by the Blessed Virgin riding upon an ass, an angel by her side. Making th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

i.42 MEXICO AND THE MEXICANS. ter that, Vespers were sung in the church, and dusk came up on the little city of San Lionel. No wonder, nurtured amid such scenes, that the genius of Mexico has produced musicians, painters and poets. Here genius dwells in the midst of beauty, and in constant con templation of the beautiful. Even under the impulse of the recent ''Liberal" Reform Movement, the people of the re public do not appear to have lost any of their love of Catho lic Beauty and Catholic Truth. So restrictive upon the faith of eleven millions of people have some of the "Reform" of the so-called, "Liberalists," become, however, that it is nothing unusual to hear a wish for annexation to the United States expressed, since the latter country does not, certainly, prohibit the education of priests and religion, within her borders, as the present Republic of Mexico is attempting to do, with more or less effect. -John Serena in The Poor Sauls1 Advaeate. & S m Sa w& wj& Carlyl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

H3 8 : THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3 3C Unjust to Catholic Indians, 2 2C m J T is bad enough to be an Indian these days, but to be a Catholic and an Indian is a calamity. At least that is what we are to judge from the way our government treats Catholic Indians. Some time ago the Commissioner of Indian Af fairs made a ruling that Indian children who were in attendance upon- any school other than a Government school are denied ration money. This applied to the whole family, mother and father as well as children, and meant a loss of a great deal of money to the poor Indian families whose child ren attended any but Government schools. It so happens that Catholics are the only religious denomination which main tain Indian schools. Therefore these were the only schools affected by this order. The matter was brought up before the Board of Indian Commissioners, ten in number, two of whom are Catholics, Archbishop Ryan, of Philadelphia, and Mr. Bonaparte, of Baltimore, the other eight being members...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

144 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. lie schools. But there was a man in the United States Sen ate unwilling to grant the unanimous consent necessary to its passage. That was none other than Henry Cabot Lodge, junior Senator from Massachusetts. Senator Lodge made a point of order against the amendment, thereby compelling the President of the Senate to declare it out of order. Why Mr. Lodge should have done this seems a mystery. But one explanation may be that his aim was to prevent justice being done to the Catholic Indians. The Massachusetts Senator has given no good reason for discriminating against the Cath olic Indians. But Senator Vest, of Missouri, in a debate upon the Indian Appropriation bill, furnished many strong argu ments in favor of the amendment that Senator Lodge killed. Senator Vest said: "I shall be obliged to any lawyer or Senator to tell me how the order of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs agrees w.ith the Constitution of the United States, which says there shall be no disc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 145 pense to a Catholic school, to a private school, the children are to be starved. Notwithstanding the treaty provides for furnishing rations to them, the Indian and his wife or squaw are to be starved, in defiance of the Constitution and the treaty, unless his children are sent to a day school." If Senator Lodge were blessed with as large a tolerance as characterizes the Senator from Missouri he would not have blocked the amendment whose purpose was to do justice to Catholic Indians. TJic Catholic News. Fear of Human Opinion. "I would willingly fulfil my religious duties, but 1 am afraid of ridicule.". Then you are afraid to go to heaven, and not afraid to go to' hell? You must have a very singular cour age, and a remarkable determination? Oh, man, feeble and faithless! you are indeed faint-hearted, and should blush for your own weakness and dishonor, for what, I ask, is a greater dishonor than cowardice? Respect for human opinion in matters of religion is th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

146 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. laws of its being when conscious only of the passing moments of its limited .existence. But you yourself are here on earth only that you may hereafter go to heaven; and time for you is nothing but a prelude to eternity. Heaven and eternity! Behold the end and aim of life, the end which should reign supreme above all others, and without which everything is lost. Therefore, by not daring to serve God during your life, you wilfully renounce both heaven and eternity, you sacri fice God, your own salvation, your own soul, and your own happiness, even as you sacrificed your duty and your consci ence to a miserable fear of man, which is a thousand times unworthy of a Christian, and is despicable in a man. "I should be ridiculed." you say! What a grievous af fliction! What effect would it have upon you? You can surely afford to despise what is so utterly beneath your no tice. Suppose men laughed at you because you ate when you were hungry, and drank when you were th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Wise and Otherwise. H7 "Pooh! My papa wears evenin' clothes every time he goes to parties." ' 'That ain't anythin'. Our minister wears his night clothes every time he preaches." XX Slander, that worst of poisons, ever finds An easy entrance to ignoble minds. XX Purcell, the famous punster, being desired, one evening, when in company, to make an extempore pun, asked "on what subject?" "The King;" was the answer. "Oh, sir," said he, "the King is not a subject." M If there is a sin more deeply black than others Distinguished from the list of common crimes And legion in itself, and doubly dear To the dark prince of Kell it is hypocrisy. XX "The trouble with you," the doctor said, after examining the young man, "seems to be that something is the matter with your heart." "With my heart?" "Yes. To give it a name, it is angina pectoris ." "You'll have to guess again, doctor," said the young man. "That isn't her name at all." i-t-He, that the Christian's course hath run,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

148 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Prussia to lend his assistance to America, the King said: "Pray Doctor, what is the object you mean to attain?" "Liberty, sire," replied the philosopher; "liberty! that freedom, which is the birthright of all men." "The King, after a short pause, made this memorable answer: "I was born a Prince, and am become a King, and I will not use the powers I possess, to the ruin of my trade." n Graceful The Stewards kept a cow, much to the envy of the Jones family. One day the cow, having given an unusual amount of milk an extra supply was on hand, which, owing to the warm weather, turned sour. Mrs. Steward, desiring to be neighborly, sent the sour milk to Mrs. Jones' withjthis message: "Dear Mrs. Jones: We had some sour milk on hand, and, as we ain't got no nigs at our house, we thought may be you'uns could use it." i-t- Friendship, in truth, is but a name, Unless to few we stint the flame. The child, who many fathers share, Hath seldom known a father's care, Tis thu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

EDITORIAL. 149 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE 4. . II Published by the Benedictine Fathers of JJ . :: SACKED HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA, ti Monthly Review Under the Protection of Alary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by our Regular Superiors. TI1HMH OK StJUSCIHI'I'IONl Single Copies . . . . 15c. Animal 1 51.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign Si. 25. Kntered as Second-class Matter at Sacred Hca ., Oklahoma. I'KIVILKOBHl i. F.very Subscriber and IScucfai tor will participate in all the merits, prayers and ood works of the Kcliciotts of Sacred Heart Abbey. 2. A solemn High Mass is sunn every First Friday of the mouth in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. .). Kvcry year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Bene factors, one for the Living...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

i5o THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. reign. It is to be hoped that when the good and fair-minded people of that part of aforesaid State again choose a represen tative to Congress, they will select a man and not a bigot. tt "If a civil word of two will make a man happy," said the French King, "he must be wretched, indeed, who will not give them to him." Superiors should endeavor to keep this in view; yea, were all mankind to observe it, how much hap pier the world would be than it is. We say of this disposi tion, "that it is lighting another man's candle by one's own, which loses none of its light by what the other gains." tt Senator Loik;k has the reputation of being a statesman and a man of scholarly attainments, but if there ever was a man upon whom the broadening influences of education had just the opposite effect, that man is the junior Senator from Massachusetts. When it comes to lying in ambush for some measure intended to give a few Catholic Indians their rights, Lodge is the man, for t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 151 Wiltzius Co., of Milwaukee, Wis., gives (1903) 11,289,710 Catholics and so the proportion would be nearly 5 to 1. tt Onck more the-month of May consecrated to our heav enly Queen is at hand. Let us confidently address Mary, our Mother, with St. Bernard: "O Clement, O pious, O sweet Virgin Maryl Clement to the needy; compassionate to those who invoke her; mild to those who love her; indulgent to wards penitents; benign in favor of the just; generous in her bounties; sweet when she gives herself to those who seek her." Happy the country that is consecrated to Mary; happy the city, the hamlet, the lonely wayside shrine where her im age is honred. Happy the Christian family where during this beautiful month her intercession is invoked. Hail, Mother most pure: Hail, Virgin renowned: Hail, Queen of the stars Asa diadem-crowned. Above all the angels In glory untold Standing next to our King In a vesture of gold. O Mother of Mercy! O star of the wave! O hope of the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

' ,1 I y i ! 152 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE tt H 5C The Patronage of Mary. C A :h mT is not to be doubted that in becoming man for the redemption of the world, Christ was free to make choice of a mother; and it was meet that the sublime honor of the Divine maternity should be bestowed upon the highest, holiest, purest and best of women. That favored being was the Blessed Virgin Mary, venerated, in voked and loved by every generation of Christ ians as the Mother of the world's Redeemer. "Be hold from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed." The Gospel relates that the Magi, our forefathers in the faith, were led from the distant East by the light of a miracu lous star, which stood over the midnight cave in Bethlehem of Juda. "And they found the child, with Mary His mother; and falling down they adored Him." Through her their gifts were offered. She was their helper in glorifying God and rendering homage to the infant Messiah. And when His work on earth was accomplished and Christ ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE PATRONAGE OF MARY. 153 first miracle at Cana of Galilee was wrought out of time as He declared, at the petition of Mary, what can she not effect now that His time has come and He reigns in everlasting glory? At the prayer of Moses the waters of the Red Sea were divided that the children of Israel might pass over: the captives of Babylon prayed and escaped death in the fiery furnace: God heard the prayer of Daniel and delivered him from the lion's den. Will not the same God, who for love of us became man and was born of the Virgin Mary will not He hear her prayers? Was she not holier, dearer to Him than Joshua or Moses or Daniel? Every age has invoked the intercession of Mary, and every age has experienced its power. When the infidel hordes of the Ottoman Empire stood before the gates of Vienna, threatening to devastate Europe, the Christian leaders in voked the patronage of her, who is "terrible as an army in battle array," with what confidence and with what results all the worl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

154 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the world." When night approaches, just as the last rays of the set ting sun are gilding the summits of the Alps, the shepherd who inhabits the highest peak takes his horn and cries in a loud voice: "Praised be the Lord. "The neighboring shepherds take up the cry, which rings from peak to peak; while the echo of the rocks repeat the salutation, "Praised be the Lord." When life's exile is ended for us, and, "on the wings of impatience and desire," our soul takes flight into the land of the unknown, may it be ours, through Mary's interession, to ascend even to the mountain of Good, from whose far heights is heard the ceaseless cry of many voices: "Glory to the Lord our God." Ave Maria. wj J5 wy A Beloved Indian Missionary. Rev. Aloys Bosch, S. J., whose death occurred recently at St. Joseph's hospital, Omaha, Neb., was one of the best known and most zealous missionaries among the Indian agen cies of the West. For the past fourteen years he had labored amongjth...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 155 crutches he fell and broke the limb again. This necessitated his removal to St. Joseph's hospital, Omaha, where death followed the requisite operation. The good missionary's re mains were taken back to Holy Rosary Mission, where the requiem Mass was attended by all who had known and loved him. Rev. Joseph Lindebner, S. J., preached a Lakota ser mon to the many Indians present. When the coffin was low ered into the grave the Indians began their mournful cry, and many tears were shed over the grave of the noble and unsel fish worker, whose soul had gone to claim its eternal reward. Catholic Columbian. Benedictine News. D. Hilary Cassal and D. Norbert Hue, two Benedictine Fathers of Sacred Heart, Okla., gave a two weeks' Mission at Abbeville, La. Rt. Rev. Abbot Dom Gasquet, O. S. B., Abbot General of the English Congregation, assisted at the third centenary celebration of the Bodleian Library. He wore the religious garb, the first seen within the walls of Oxfor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

5 BENEDICTINE NEWS. the church of St. Ambrose ( Rome) by his Eminence, Cardi nal Gotti,, Prefect of the Propaganda, assisted by the Abbot Primat and D. M. Serafini, our Abbot General. Present in the sanctuary were his Eminence, Cardinal Yives, his Grace, Most Rev. D. Serafini, O. S. B., Archbishop of Spoleto, It aly, his Grace, Mgr. Murphy, Archbishop of Hobart Town, Australia, the students of St. Anselm's College, representa tives of the Benedictine Order and the Roman Curia. On February 24th, of this year, Buckfast Abbey (Eng land) was the scene of a historic and imposing ceremony, when theRt. Rev. Boniface Natter, of the Ancient Order of St. Bene dict, was blessed Abbot of the Abbey with all the magnificent ritual of the Catholic Church. Says the Western Mercury: "Not for 365 years has the Abbey been- under the rule ot an Abbot. The Bishop of Plymouth, Mgr. Graham, I"). D., of ficiated. The Abbot-elect was supported by D. Romain, O. S. B., Abbot of St. Benedict (Dourgne in France...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 May 1903

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 157 might continue to increase." Among the invited guests we notice the names of Rt. Rev. Thomas Bergh, Abbot of Canterbury and Administrator of Ramsgate (Kent)., Lord Clifford and Rev. Father A. Am andolini, 0. S. B., formerly of Muskogee, I. T. Cardinal Gotti's Letter. Editor Indian Advocatf.: His Eminence Cardinal Gotti, Prefect of the Sacred Con gregation of the Propaganda, has written the following letter to the Central Councils of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith: "Called by His Holiness Pope Leo XIII to direct the Congregation of the Propaganda, I cannot refrain from expressing my deep esteem and most sincere gratitude to all who co-operate in the extension of our holy re ligion and true civilivation. "The position which I hold, daily increases my appreciation of the merits of the Society, for the Propagation of the Faith, an admirable work which is truly of Heaven; it assists Catholic missions in all parts of the earth, giving necessary aid t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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