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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 For the past several years I have seen a cute „ little gentleman playing banjo and dancing up a storm. When I found out he was eighty years old, I was amazed. On a hot summer day I decided to drive up to Carroll County and meet Mr. Calvin Cole and his wife Viola. Winding down a quiet country road, I found Calvin Cole sitting on the porch of his neat mobile home, eating a banana. He invited me into his home and to meet Viola. I spent a very enjoyable afternoon with them talking and looking at pictures and scrapbooks. Calvin Cole related some of his life's story: "My parents were Andy and Lillie Cole. I had two brothers and one sister. My birthplace was in Grayson County [Virginia]. As a child I messed around on the farm. When I was about eight years, I was milking a cow and feeding the horses. There was always work to do, but I always found time to play baseball, ride horses, fish and swim. 1 found a banjo laying around the house and started pick...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

My mother's father was Columbus Penn Vaughn. He was born in Patrick County, Virginia in the year 1845. His father was Wilson Vaughn and his mother was Susannah DeHart. One year after the Civil War he became sixteen years old and joined the Rebel Army. The next three years of his life were spent in connection with the battles fought in the Valley of Virginia until he was captured at Manassas and placed in a prison a Point Lookout, Maryland the last six months of the war. I wish I could remember more of the details of the stories he would tell about the war and the conditions before and after. His father owned slaves. However, Grandpa and his three brothers worked on the farm doing the same work, eating the same food and wearing the same kind of homemade clothes that the slaves did. A black man named Sam was the farm foreman and Grandpa and his brothers would obey Sam the same as they did their father. After the war was over he came home and married Julia Ann Hatcher. They had fifteen...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 The Mail Box Dear Folks, Will you please send us a copy of your 32 page collection of BACKROADS TOURS as described in the ad in the April issue of The Mountain Laurel. We enjoy your paper so very much and always say a prayer of thanks to each writer and contributor (read every word of the ads). This paper is passed on to us each time by a friend who subscribes and goes down your way to play in the Bluegrass Festivals. I'm disabled and "armchair travel" is my No. 1 hobby - especially in the Blue Ridge Area! Many thanks for all, Mrs. B.J. Leslie Deckerville, Michigan Dear Mountain Laurel, My husband received a one years subscription to your great little paper. It is the best birthday gift he has ever gotten. It holds him spell bound until he reads every word, then he allows me to read it. I must say we both have lived a part of almost every story. We know what it means to dig out a living on a hill side farm. I have been collecting Appalachian fol...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

GENEALOGY | GENEALOGY I am interested in finding information on my great grandparents, Ellis May berry and Tabatha Howard Maybery. They had one son, Luther Mayberry. Ellis and Tabatha divorced and she married George Cooper. Luther took the name Cooper and raised eleven children in Eolia, Kentucky. If anyone knows the whereabouts of Ellis and his family, please contact me as we can share information on Luther Mayberry Cooper. Benjamin L. Cooper Rt. 1, Box 160 Hiltons, VA 24258 I would like to correspond with others doing pre-Civil War work on these families: Bandy, Hylton, Hanks, Atkinson in Montgomery and Bedford counties, Virginia; Powers, Woodyard, Nicewonder, MacPherson in Giles County, Virginia. 2605 S. Dundee Tampa, FL 33629 Subscribe Today 4>aurel or * J^aurel Send a Friend a Gift to The Mountain Laurel Monthly Journal of Mountain Life , 1 Year (12 Issues) Only SIO.OO FREE Complimentary Copy to one of your friends. Just list their y Od Onl v 800 name and address bel...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 Jennie was aware of the pendulum swinging to and fro in the old mantle clock downstairs on that particular Wednesday morning, November 5, 1919. She was dressing for a trip to the northeast town of Rocky Mount, Virginia, the nearest city to her mountain home. The house was quiet; Mama and Papa were tending chores somewhere outside. She brushed her long brown hair, then adjusted the wide brim, black felt hat on her head. With a pleased glance in the mirror, she crossed the large loft-bedroom to the stairs. As she descended the stairs, the clock struck nine. "Get the Victrola and come on, Kitty," Jennie called to her sister, "we need to hurry so we won't miss the train. Carrying the heavy Victrola will slow us down." Two mile to Nola, commonly known as Prillman Switch, was a long way to walk even without a heavy load. Pausing on the porch, Jennie looked at the trees in their brilliant hues. Autumn had lasted into early November and was in its final...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

THE GOOD OLE DAYS BY: JOANNE SEAY ®i»88 Unlike most young people now a days, at 25 I appreciate each and every material thing my generation grew up with. Things that were just "there" for us were only in the dreams of the earlier generations. Thanks to some very special old timers, I now realize how fortunate we are, materially. Monroe "Jess" McMillan and his sister Arvala McMillan Strickland are the two wonderful people who have given me insight of the long hard road way of life. He being 93 in January, 1988 and she 95, they have really traveled a long, hard road. Born in the 1890's to Alex and Louisa McMillan in the mountains of Cana, Virginia, the two oldest of twelve children, they were raised in a poor mountain family who had very little. Their father dabbed in a little of everything - farming and justice of the peace being a couple of his jobs - just to make a living for his large family. He was known far and wide for his intelligence, while he had only about four years of edu...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 I was born in Forsyth County in WinstonSalem, North Carolina, May 28, 1916. We moved to Martinsville when I was 9 years old. My Dad ran a grocery store at Ogburn Station, N.C. and Dad rented a farm across from the store. I remember we had cows, chickens, hogs, and horses. If we raised any crops other than Mom's garden, I can not recall. But I do know that my Dad was a trader also. He traded horses and mules. Mom would fall in love with her milk cow, feed it so good, and it would give milk galore. But, if someone saw the cow and wanted to buy it, sell it Dad would. He always made money off of it, or if it was swapping Dad would always get boot. Then poor Mom would start her feeding and kind words on another cow. Once Dad and some more deputies raided a still. They brought the copper still and two five gallon square cans of booze for evidence when the trial came up and put them in the basement One day I heard a gurgling sound. My oldest brother wa...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

The little blond haired boy lived at the foot of the mountains in an old farm house nestled in a hollow. The house was surrounded by the barn, cellar, spring house, hen house and an outside john. In the gently rolling valley beyond grew corn, tobacco and a huge garden. Sonny and his little sister Suzie had both been born in the old house and had spent all their young lives there never knowing that any other way of life existed beyond Shady Valley. Sonny's father was an older man who was bedridden by the time Sonny was nine years old leaving most of the menial labor to him. Sonny didn't mind chopping wood or even cutting the tobacco but Lord how he dreaded weeding that garden! "No son, you put them weeds in this box and throw them over the fence," his mother would instruct. "Aw Mom, can't I just hoe em down?" Sonny would argue. "No siree, now you just do as I say son." "Ain't no use in planting them weed seeds all over again." Every time garden weeding time came around they had the s...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is one of a series of articles written by Grace Cash of Flowery Branch, Georgia. Watch for more of her stories in the future. Nothing ever fascinated the young people at Chestnut Mountain as did "The Charleston", a fast solo dance which I first knew about in 1925. Square dancing in first one house and then another was taken for granted as a part of all the other rural customs. When we lived at Papa's Place, Mama taught us the "buck dance", and she tried us out with a dance none of us mastered: Bend over, head and knees a few feet above the floor, animal-fashion, Turn hands in, then out, the knuckles beating a rhythm with the dancing feet. Nobody tried as hard as I did to learn "The Charleston", which was spreading over the United States like a raging woods fire. I would hold to a post on the front porch at our house on the hill, and force my feet to do the steps. Eventually I could support my feet without the post, b...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

FOOD FROM NATURE'S WILDWOOD BY: DELIA MAYS © 1988 Now that summer has come and the woods and fields are producing an abundance of herbs, leaves, bark and roots that may be eaten, it is time now to get out and avail ones self with a big bait of all the good free fare, just for the picking and will supply a body with fresh vitamins and minerals. Listed below is a description of some of the best. 1. Wild Lettuce - excellent for greens, it grow in rich woods, break off a leaf and a drop of milk will ooze out. Good cooked with other greens. 2. Wild Mustard - Look in old field for these plants with yellow blooms. All wild mustards are good greens to eat. 3. Shepherds Purse - Makes good eating, it is a member of the cress family. 4. Watercress - This is the best greens. May be eaten raw dressed with oil and vinegar, if picked young and tender. Or cooked with mixed greens. It grows along stream beds. 5. Winter Cress - Makes delicious eating. Look for it in cultivated ground, it has yellow b...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 Even the most outspoken critic of Herman Kupps agreed that he was an honest, hardworking man. "Hogman," as he was called because his primary source of income came from raising pigs, paid his bills. No one would contend with that statement. "Hogman's word is gold," his neighbors would swear. Yet, Hogman had an inordinate number of critics around our neck of the woods, especially among the female segment of the population. If Hogman was without a friend among the ladies in our area, he had only himself to blame. For he had a tongue, the vileness of which would blanch the cheeks of a veteran mule skinner. He was irreverent and blasphemous, and men of the cloth shunned him like a yellow fever epidemic. Opinions were about equally divided as to how Hogman would eventually meet his destiny. Some vowed that he was doomed to eternal perdition, while others predicted that something would happen to turn this foul-mouthed sinner to the straight and narrow....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

THE DEVIL & HOGMAN KUPPS (Continued from page 20.) If Hogman had never known terror before, he knew it now. He was like a condemned man standing on the gallows floor. He was ready to bargain anything for his soul. "Please, Mr. Devil," he begged pitifully, "I just sold some hogs, and I got eighteen dollars of the money left. I aimed to use it to buy me some new fence, but I sure will give it to you if you'll just let me go." "You can't buy me off with money. The hour is late but maybe there is still a chance for you. Now you know I like entertainment. If you could please me with a good dance, I might just let you off." Without further ado, Hogman broke into a clumsy, stumbling imitation of a clog. Before he had cut more than a dozen steps, Ike stepped forward with his pitchfork raised menacingly. "Stop!" he ordered. "That's the worst excuse for dancing I've ever seen. Maybe you could try prayer. If you could show me some good sincere praying, I might be inclined to show m...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1988 BACKROADS (Continued from page 24.) 4J£ (0.2) At this point we will turn right on state road 887. Both sides of this road are lined with honeysuckles and the smell is so good. 5.4 (1.1) We are now crossing another small creek. Immediately after passing over the creek, the Blue Ridge Country Club is on our right. 6.9 (1.5) On our right is the Gladesville School. Immediately beyond the school and on your left is an interesting old building that was once probably an old feed mill. There are goats in the yard beside it. 7.1 (0.2) We will turn right on state road 635 7.9 (0.8) On either side of the road here are huge pine trees. It is such a cool place to drive through. Under the pines there are large patches of Mayapples and other wildflowers growing along the road. The countrysides are beautiful through here. There are views of rolling meadows and distant mountain peaks. 9.6 (1.7) The building on our left was the old Mount Vernon school building. O...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

BACKROADS (Continued from page 22.) to get as much of it open to the public as possible, as well as planning facilities and events along the trail which will enhance the visitor's enjoyment The trail parallels Chestnut Creek along this section and if you walk to the right of the parking area, Chestnut Creek flows into the New River in two miles. This two mile hike contains more scenery than you will experience in many much longer hikes. Within this two mile stretch you will see a tunnel hand dug in the 1880's, a railroad tressel, beautiful views of mountains, creeks, wildflowers and the beautiful New River, oldest river on earth. It is a perfect place to take the whole family for an afternoon walk and picnic. Perhaps even a dip in the river, or at least some serious wading. The trail is wide and well cleared. We will now turn around and trace our way back the way we drove in. As you drive along looking at the beautiful scenery, you can't help but think, "This is the real thing. This...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1988

ifte Heart ot the blue Riage JLaurel ' w Win' 1 . 1 ' '• <3^ Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life | OCTOBER 1988 Volume 5 Number 3 $1.25 | FAUE 24 HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. IBACKRO^^^ "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hay rakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have never known polution. There's a part of our heritage on our backroads that no pen o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

Thanksgiving day in my boyhood was a time for the men to hunt and the women folk to visit, gossip and prepare the big meal of the year. My family did all those things by visiting Aunt Alice and Uncle Whit who lived high in the mountains in the heart of rabbit hunting country. It was there, many years ago, that they tended crops, milked cows and raised their children on a diet of hard work, love and wild greens seasoned with fat back. An occasional wild possum added interest to their suppers. A day at their farm was an adventure we looked forward to each Thanksgiving to celebrate the holiday and escape the boredom of our farm chores. Yes, life on a Depression farm was an endless series of days filled with sameness, doing work the same way generations before had done it and for reasons long lost in time. For example, we had to hoe the corn three times a year before "Laying-it-by" whether it needed it or nQt. I've always heard it said that hill people were slow to acquire new ways and ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE,2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, 1988 AUNT ALICE (Continued from page 1.) to death." The things I remember most about those times were the smell of wood smoke from the cabins near Uncle Whit's farm, the aroma of apple pies baking in Aunt Alice's kitchen and the quiet settings of mountain farms nestled in protected hollows to await the whiteness of winter. In my childhood these things were free and I know that the people who survived the hard times of the 1930's were eternal optimists. Back in the thirties a goodly number of folks in my part of Carroll County, Virginia were destitute and receiving some kind of help from the County. We called it "Being on Relief." My father helped hand out the government flour, dried milk, cheese and now and then a few cans of evaporated milk to those who were hungry and in some cases close to starvation. But those strong, proud mountain people always saw hope in hopeless situations and found happiness when sadness ruled the times. Grandma Violet once...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

4 *£*!&. I The Mountain Laurel f ' SPECIAL CHRISTMAS OFFER ! I | I Send a whole year of reading pleasure. ® I J|||L Send 6 Gift Subscriptions 1 * MB&r For $40.00 1 P (A savings of $20.00) '1 f§ With each gift subscription, we will send an original |j S design Christmas Card announcing your gift. If GIFT FROM: N *^ E l | | j| NAME I NAME j| j|' ADDRESS 8 ADDRESS If j| CITY I CITY || jg STATE ZIP | STATE ZIP § If this is a renewal gift, please check < | If this is a renewal gift, please check jg NAME I NAME || % ADDRESS I ADDRESS || j| CITY | CITY 3| i\ STATE ZIP § STATE ZIP 1 i " _| _^e If this is a renewal gift, please check ______ ' If this is a renewal gift, please check <3s^ M NAME I NAME 'fit H ADDRESS . | ADDRESS j| jg CITY _ P. CITY || j| STATE ZIP J STATE ZIP j| Llf this is a renewal gift, please check | If this is a renewal gift, please check

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

PAGE.4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL NOVEMBER, .1988 Lora Ellen Fuller would be described today as a woman ahead of her times. In the mid-1890's it was most unusual for a girl of sixteen years to pack her leather trunks, don her traveling attire, bid her family good-bye, and board the train at a nearby depot with two years of college education as her destination. Lora, her parents, and younger brother, Ernest, lived in a colonial house on a prosperous farm in the little community of Soapstone, Virginia, just a few miles from the village of Axton. Her father was a local merchant engaging several families to tend the rolling fields of his farm at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. It was in these surroundings that Lora developed her values of living, was trained by her mother in the proper behavior of a young lady, and received the educational foundation from the local schools for her college years. As the train chugged into Danville, Virginia, station one can imagine that Lora remained cal...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 November 1988

(Continued from page 4.) as a date) the chaperone sat in earshot of the couple and visits were limited to two hours. As long as Lora lived she enjoyed beautiful clothes and loved to shop, buying her last dress two weeks before her death at age 85. Shopping as a college student had a different twist than it was like during her later years. In contrastto today's student who dashes downtown or to the nearest mall whenever she wishes, Lora and her classmates could only shop on certain days during hours determined by the college officials. The girls going shopping would walk two abreast down the street with the ever-present chaperones watching their every move. Department stores in rural Virginia towns were in their infancy and the best dressed ladies relied on their talents as a dressmaker. Lora recounted one incident of going to her favorite dressmaker's shop one afternoon for several hours of fittings. Her chaperone left her with implicit instructions to stay at the shop until she ret...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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